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Full text of "Annual Report of the Adjutant General, year ending December 31, 1901"

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PUBLIC DOCUMENT . . . . 



. . . . No. 7. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



ADJUTANT . GEN EB AL 



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FOB THE 



Year ending December 31, 1901. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1902. 



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ANNUAL REPORT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Dec. 31, 1901. 

To His Excellency Governor W. Murray Crane. 

Governor :' — I have the honor to most respectfully sub- 
mit the annual report of this department for the year 1901. 

Militia. 

The organization of the militia remains the same as at last 
report, with the exception of the loss of two companies of 
infantry and one division of the Naval Brigade, and the mus- 
ter in of one company of infantry. The duties performed 
during the year have shown an advancement. Reports of 
the Inspector General and his assistants have been forwarded 
to each command, calling attention to defects and suggesting 
the desired improvement. The few weak commands during 
the year did not show much improvement. These com- 
mands should receive the attention of the commanding offi- 
cers of their organizations, and, if improvement is not shown 
in the spring, they should be at once recommended for dis- 
bandment and other companies put in in their places, for 
which there are enough petitions now on file. I refer you 
to the report of the Inspector General for details as to con- 
dition of the force. 

The following companies were found below the proper 
standard of efficiency, and were disbanded on reports of in- 
specting officers and commanding officers : — 

Company F, Second Infantry, disbanded February 9. 

Company D, Ninth Infantry, disbanded May 25. 

Company D, Naval Brigade, disbanded August 10. 

The vacancy in the Second Infantry was filled by the pe- 
tition from city of Pittsfield granted by Your Excellency. 
The company was mustered in June 6, and performed its 
camp duty the same month in a most satisfactory manner. 



4 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 

Vacancies of one company each remain in the Eighth and 
Ninth Infantry, and, while there are several petitions on file 
for new companies, it is not desirable to accept any new 
companies until sufficient time is allowed to select. 

The last disbandment in the Naval Brigade leaves eight 
companies in that command, — the number allowed until 
the Spanish war, when four additional companies were 
added. Under the act creating the four new companies, 
they have been disbanded. No additions can be made to the 
Naval Brigade. 

The Board appointed on militia law submitted a report 
and draft of new law to the Legislature, which was referred 
to the next Legislature. Many recommendations of the 
Board, if adopted, would have been beneficial. 

Chapter 274, Acts of the Legislature, allowed the Legions 
of Spanish War Veterans to parade a color guard of twelve 
men. 

Tours of Duty. 

Troop A, First Battalion Cavalry, performed escort duty 
to Your Excellency on the occasion of the annual visit to 
Harvard College Commencement, on June 26. 

Battery A, Light Artillery, paraded for salute duty on 
Boston Common on September 17, the day of the national 
funeral of the lamented President William McKinley. 

The First Brigade, Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Mathews com- 
manding (except First Regiment Heavy Artillery), per- 
formed its camp duty and annual drill at the State camp 
ground, from June 21 to June 28 inclusive. 

The Second Brigade, Brig. Gen. Jophanus H. Whitney 
commanding (except the Eighth Regiment of Infantry and 
Battery A, Light Artillery), performed its camp duty and 
annual drill at the State camp ground, from July 19 to July 
26 inclusive. 

The First Regiment Heavy Artillery, Col. James A. Frye 
commanding, performed its camp duty and annual drill at 
Fort Rodman, New Bedford, between July 20 and August 12. 

The Eighth Regiment Infantry, Col. William A. Pew, Jr., 
commanding, performed its camp duty and annual drill at 
Boxford, from July 9 to July 16 inclusive. 

Battery A, Light Artillery, Second Brigade, Capt. Samuel 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 5 

D. Parker commanding, performed its camp duty and annual 
drill en route and in camps on Cape Cod, from July 20 to 
July 27 inclusive. 

The Naval Brigade, Capt. George K. H. Buffinton com- 
manding, performed its camp duty and annual drill at Fort 
Rodman, New Bedford, from August 17 to August 24 in- 
clusive. 

The First Corps of Cadets, Lieut. Col. Thomas F. Edmancls 
commanding, performed its camp duty and annual drill at 
Hingham, from July 13 to July 20 inclusive. 

The Second Corps of Cadets, Lieut. Col. Walter F. Peck 
commanding, performed its camp duty and annual drill at 
Boxford, from August 17 to August 24 inclusive. 

The Ambulance Corps served in the camps of the First 
and Second Brigades. The officers and men not on the 
above details performed their annual drill at Lexington -on 
October 10. 

The Signal Corps, Second Brigade, performed its annual 
drill November 16, at stations near Boston. 

Details of firing squads for funerals of officers and men 
have been made during the year. 

Heavy Artillery. 
The First Regiment had a satisfactory camp, with modern 
artillery and projectiles, at Fort Rodman. The appropria- 
tion made two years ago for artillery equipment for this 
regiment had an unexpended balance, Jan. 1, 1901, of 
$2,861. Of this amount, there has been expended $436. 
Bills outstanding will increase the expenditure. By law the 
unexpended balance lapses into the treasury, Jan. 1, 1902. 

Active Militia. 

The force now allowed by law is 473 officers, 6,060 en- 
listed men. 

The present force is about ninety per cent, of the number 
allowed by law. 

Enrolled Militia. 
Returns from cities and towns show the number of en- 
rolled militia to be 468,649, showing an increase of 2,607. 



6 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

Rifle Practice. 

This branch of the service has been carried on by the 
Department of Rifle Practice, and I refer you to the re- 
port of Col. James G. White for the details of the yearly 
work. Annual appropriation, $18,000. Of this, there has 
been expended $17,882.49. 

Armories. 

The armories of the militia remain the same as last year, 
with the exception of changes noted below. Complaints of 
inspecting officers and captains of inadequate quarters have 
been investigated, and where improvements were not made, 
the rent has been reduced. 

Some cities and towns do not give the attention to armo- 
ries which they should. Dampness, occasioned by leaks in 
roofs, injures United States and State property. A few 
armories are not properly heated or lighted. Attention has 
been called to these defects, and in most cases they have 
been remedied. 

The armory at Northampton, which was condemned as 
unsafe two years ago, has been given up, and on Septem- 
ber 1 the company in that city occupied a new armory, built 
for the purpose. 

The city of Medford armory was also condemned. A new 
armory of beautiful design and dimensions is being built in 
that city by Gen. Samuel C. Lawrence, a public-spirited 
citizen, and will probably be occupied early in the coming 
year. 

Company D, of the Ninth Infantry, Charlestown district, 
was disbanded, and the armory given up. 

Company F, of Gardner, was disbanded, and the armory 
given up. A new company was formed at Pittsfield, which 
has been furnished with an armory. 

Four companies of the Naval Brigade were transferred 
early in the year to the East Newton Street armory from 
the U. S. S. ''Minnesota," and the headquarters of the 
Naval Brigade transferred to Fall River and located in the 
armory there. 

The city of New Bedford has taken advantage of the act 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 7 

of 1888, and the armory commission now has charge of 
building the armory in that city. 

The city of Cambridge has taken advantage of the act of 
1888 and will build an armory, and when the above armo- 
ries are completed an appropriation will be required for care 
of same. 

The total amount of appropriation for armory rents was 
$37,500. Of this amount, $35,855.70 has been expended. 

Two armories in Boston and one each in Springfield, 
Worcester, Lynn, Fitchburg, Fall River, Lowell and Law- 
rence, being built under the act of 1888, come under the 
exclusive control of this department. An additional appro- 
priation was asked for, to make repairs required by law, 
as some of these armories have been built several years. 
More repairs were required than estimated, and an increase 
of appropriation will be required for the coming year. 

The total amount appropriated for care, furnishing, heat- 
ing, lighting and repairs for these armories was $25,000. 
Of this amount, there has been expended $24,998.49. 

The U. S. S. " Minnesota" was turned over to the United 
States government in May. The amount appropriated for 
care, furnishing and lighting the ship was $4,000. Of this 
amount, there has been expended $2,252.43. The cost of 
transferring the ship and companies of the Naval Brigade is 
included in expenditures. The accounts with the Navy 
Department relating to the " Minnesota" with the Common- 
wealth have been forwarded to the Department, and found 
correct and allowed. 

The U. S. S. " Inca" is in use by the Naval Brigade, and 
stationed at Fall River. The appropriation for this vessel 
was $800. Of this amount, $794.76 has been expended. 
An increase of appropriation for the " Inca" should be made 
the coming year. 

Adjutant General's Department. 

All money accounts received, excepting those due Jan. 1, 
1902, have been certified to and sent to the Auditor. 

There has been expended for pay and transportation of 
troops, officers' meetings, Adjutant General's salary and 
clerks and direct expenses of the militia, $199,090.45. 



8 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

There remain in several appropriations unexpended balances 
amounting to $13,807.47, which is not available by law to 
make up deficiencies in other appropriations. 

I regret that there is a deficiency, principally in pay of 
troops and care of armories, there being a larger percentage 
of troops doing duty than in 1900 and appropriation for 1901 
was less. The armories required more repairs than was es- 
timated and expenditures exceeded the appropriation. 

The appropriation for janitors' allowance was $7,000. Of 
this amount, $6,311.25 has been expended. 

The appropriation for allowance to repairs for uniforms, 
based on the attendance of enlisted men at tours of ordered 
duty, was $9,000. Of this amount, there has been expended 
$8,740.53. 

The, estimated amount paid out for war record work for 
two clerks, postage and printing, is $3,100. 

The sum of $4,000 was appropriated for instruction in 
riding. Of this amount, $3,020 has been expended, on cer- 
tification by commanding officers. 

There is standing to the credit of this department at the War 
Department, Washington, D. C, the sum of $51,689.80, but 
small amount of supplies having been drawn during the year. 

There is standing to the credit of this department at the 
Navy Department, Washington, D. C, the sum of $17,441.51 
for arming and equipping the Naval Brigade. 

A proposition is now being considered by this department 
to equip the militia with the magazine gun the ordnance 
department, U. S. A., recently decided to issue on requisi- 
tion, to be charged to allotment to States. 

The work of preserving the war records of the rebellion 
has progressed as far as appropriation will permit. The 
amount appropriated for this work was $2,500, which, 
added to balance of $41.50 on hand, made the sum of 
$2,541.50 available. Of this amount, $2,283.75 has been 
expended. This work is most important, the process pre- 
serving records for all time. 

The rewriting of war and naval records constitutes a 
bureau in this department, under supervision of the Adjutant 
General, controlled by a commission who will make full re- 
port on the subject. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 9 

Quartermaster's Department. 

All troops were rationed by the Commissary General, and 
I refer you to his report for details of the same. 

Upon recommendation of a Medical Board, an appropria- 
tion of $2,000 was made by Kesolve 79 of the Legislature. 
Arrangements were made with the South Framingham Water 
Company to connect the camp ground pipes with their sup- 
ply. Additional fire apparatus was supplied, and the work 
was done in season for the annual encampments. Of the 
sum appropriated, there was expended $2,000. The old 
pumping station with its appliances was abandoned and con- 
demned, and the boilers, pumps and tank sold, and the 
money turned in to the treasury. 

By Resolve 83, of the Legislature, $4,000 was appropri- 
ated for repairs and painting the buildings on the camp 
ground. Of this amount, $4,000 was expended. New sills 
were put into stables and other buildings, some of which 
had been in use since 1883. 

The buildings on the camp ground have paid for them- 
selves since 1883, leaving a large balance in favor of the 
Commonwealth, over the old method of building portable 
stables and providing large headquarters with tents and tent 
floors. If the grounds are to be continued for camping pur- 
poses, the buildings built in 1883 will soon have to be 
thoroughly renovated, for which an appropriation may be 
asked. 

The State grounds are in good condition. The amount 
appropriated for their care was $1,000. Of this amount, 
$1,000 has been expended. 

Commanding officers in their reports of tours of duty make 
several recommendations for improvement in certain equip- 
ment and repairs, and the issue of a few additional supplies 
for the cavalry. Their recommendations will receive con- 
sideration the coming year. 

By sales of condemned property, the amount of $1,854.38 
was received and turned over to the State treasury. Of 
this amount, $1,706.50 has been expended. 

The troops of the Commonwealth are now fully equipped, 
with the exception of a full dress uniform. I believe there 



10 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

should be a full dress uniform issued, but not until the pres- 
ent style of uniforms of the United States Army is changed. 
For some four years the War Department has had this 
change under consideration, and any uniform adopted for the 
regular army should be adopted for the militia, and could 
undoubtedly be drawn on the appropriation allotted to 
States. It has been my policy to allow the appropriation to 
accumulate, and, if arms are provided by act of Congress, 
the available money could probably be used for uniforms ; 
if not, an appropriation should be made by the Legislature 
for the purpose. 

At the time of the introduction of water from Leonard's 
Pond, by acts of the Legislature, it was necessary to pur- 
chase a small plot of land on which to locate the pumping 
station. As this system has been given up, I would recom- 
mend the sale of the land by those having the authority to 
do so. 

I desire to express my thanks to Your Excellency and 
staff for many courtesies and promptness in performance of 
duty, and to the attaches of my office, my acknowledgment 
of appreciation of their services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SAMUEL D ALTON, 

Adjutant General, 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 11 



EEPOET OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 



Inspector General's Department, 
Boston, Dec. 12, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Samuel Dalton, Adjutant General. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the annual report of this 
department for the year 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Jas. L. Carter was placed on the retired list at his 
own request, May 17, 1901. The present head of the department 
was appointed by Special Orders, dated May 24, 1901. 

In obedience to General Orders, No. 2, current series, the 
armory inspections were conducted between February 1 and 
May 1. Reports of the several officers have been duly rendered. 

The following assignments of inspecting officers were made by 
General Carter: Inspector General, to the Sixth Regiment In- 
fantry; Lieut. Col. Jas. T. Soutter, A. I. G., to the First Regi- 
ment Heavy Artillery, First Battalion Light Artillery, Light 
Battery A and Ambulance Corps ; Lieut. Col. Edw. J. Gihon, 
A. I. G., to the Ninth Regiment Infantry and First Corps Cadets ; 
Lieut. Col. Henry L. Williams, A. I. G., to the Second Regiment 
Infantry and Second Corps Cadets ; Lieut. Col. Jas. G. White, 
A. I. G., to the Eighth Regiment Infantry, First Battalion Cavalry, 
Troop F and Signal Corps ; Lieut. Col. Arthur B. Denny, A. I. G., 
to the Fifth Regiment Infantry and Naval Brigade. 

The changes in the personnel of this department have been as 
follows : Brig. Gen. Jas. L. Carter, Inspector General, retired 
May 17, 1901 ; Lieut. Col. Jas. G. White, A. I. G., appointed 
Inspector General of Rifle Practice June 7, 1901 ; Brig. Gen. 
Wm. H. Brigham, Inspector General, appointed May 24, 1901 ; 
Lieut. Col. George H. Benyon, A. I. G., appointed June 7, 1901. 

Owing to the changes in this department and the conflicting 
dates of some of the encampments, it was found impossible to 
assign to the several organizations the same inspecting officers 
that made their armory inspection. The following assignments 
were made : Inspector General, to brigade headquarters, Signal 
Corps, Ambulance Corps and Second Corps Cadets ; Col. Jas. G. 
White, I. G. R. P., acting A. I. G., to the Sixth and Eighth 



12 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

Regiments of Infantry and Troop F ; Lieut. Col. Jas. T. Soutter, 
A. I. G., to the First Regiment Heavy Artillery and First Battalion 
Light Artillery; Lieut. Col. E. J. Gihon, A. I. G., to the Second 
and Ninth Regiments Infantry and First Corps Cadets ; Lieut. 
Col. Arthur B. Denny, A. I. G., to the First Battalion Cavalry 
and Light Battery A. The reports of these inspectors showed 
careful and conscientious work, and I recommend careful con- 
sideration of their criticisms and recommendations. 

Great progress has been made in the militia in the past year in 
general knowledge of camp duty; and hard, practical work is 
surely taking the place of some of the spectacular exhibitions of 
former years. 

The desirability of regimental and battalion camps is becoming 
more evident each year. The very successful tours of duty per- 
formed by the Eighth Regiment at Boxford and Light Battery A 
at Sandwich are conclusive evidence of the advantages to be gained 
by these camps. I am of the opinion that a change, wherein the 
brigade camps shall be held but once in three years, or even every 
other year, the off years being given up to regimental and bat- 
talion camps, situated on the coast or in the several counties, will 
prove beneficial to the militia. 

Some of the needed reforms and desired improvements, suggested 
by the former head of the department, are still waiting to be 
carried out. 

The official visits and armory inspections carried on by the field 
officers do not yield the results they should in many instances. 
These officers should promptly report to their colonels all unsatis- 
factory conditions found, and prompt measures should be taken to 
correct same before the State inspection. Weak companies should 
be carefully looked after, their officers encouraged and advised, 
and if any are found incompetent, means should be taken to re- 
place them. Poor, weak companies under inefficient officers are a 
menace to the militia ; they have no excuse to exist, and should 
not be tolerated. With thirty applications on file, there is plenty 
of available material to keep the force up to the highest standard 
of efficiency. 

The brigade camps were held at Framingham as follows : 
First Brigade, from June 21 to 28 ; Second Brigade, July 20 to 27, 
inclusive. 

Castrametation, excellent. The brigade commanders with their 
staff worked hard and conscientiously to make the camps a success. 
Their example was not followed as faithfully as it should have 
been in some of the organizations of the brigades. 

The weather conditions, especially during the Second Brigade 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 13 

camp, were not of the best, it being necessary to suspend some of 
the drills and ceremonies, owing to the intense heat. 

The field manoeuvres performed by the First Brigade were quite 
extensive, and some knowledge was gained in making and break- 
ing camp, advance and rear guard and fire discipline. 

It was the opinion of the officers of this department present that 
satisfactory results can be obtained in these field operations without 
compelling the men, most of them fresh from civil life, to take 
chances of injuring their health by sleeping on the damp ground 
and enduring hardships not required by necessity. 

The sanitary arrangements at both camps were excellent. Guard 
duty was unsatisfactory at both camps. Many sentinels were 
found who could not repeat their general orders, and in one instance 
a sentinel informed the inspector that he had never heard of gen- 
eral orders, although he had been a member of the militia for 
several months. Recruits should be instructed in guard duty in 
the armory, rather than on post at State headquarters. Officers 
should never put their men on guard for punishment, but, instead, 
should try to impress upon them that to serve as a well-informed 
sentinel is an honor to be sought. 

Many officers and men were noticed uncovering while passing 
under the post flag. This custom is not in accordance with regu- 
lations, and publicity should be given to the fact to prevent its 
recurrence. 

Attention is again called to paragraph 384 of regulations, 
which reads as follows : " Officers and soldiers in camp or on other 
duty shall not be permitted to louuge out of tents or quarters bare- 
headed or in shirt sleeves." The violation of this regulation at 
both brigade camps this year has been so noticeable that all of the 
inspectors have reported it, and, if possible, it was worse than last 
year, when General Carter condemned it so severely. Over twenty 
enlisted men were counted among the spectators at evening parade 
on Thursday at First Brigade camp, clad only in under-shirts and 
trousers. Some had on shirts with sleeves, others without, some 
with striped jerseys and all kinds of suspenders. Many had their 
caps on the backs of their heads, giving them a tough and slouchy 
appearance. It is an easy matter for a man to keep neat and 
soldierly looking. It would certainly improve his self-respect, as 
well as the appearance of the command to which he is attached, 
and he should be taught, and compelled, if necessary, to be care- 
ful of his personal appearance. In certain commands there was 
too much ambition to play the part of the " rough old soldier." 
Carelessness and slackness were the results. 

Among the officers a lack of uniformity in dress and equipment 



14 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

was noticeable. Not enough attention to the little details of dress 
was given. Many were seen wearing dress scabbards and gold 
sword knots with fatigue and khaki uniforms, officers in the same 
command wearing boots, putties or leggings, also a great variety 
of collar devices. 

I agree with the recommendations of my predecessor as to the 
advisability of issuing a dress uniform to the troops, and hope to 
see the suggestion carried out in the near future, believing it will 
in a great measure counteract the tendency toward indifference 
and carelessness above noted. 

The commissary department, under the efficient administration 
of Brigadier General Wellington, is in a very satisfactory condi- 
tion. With experience, a most satisfactory system of feeding the 
troops has been established, and they have been supplied with 
plenty of good, nourishing food at a minimum cost, and at the 
same time a number of bright young officers are being educated in 
the duties of commissaries, which must result in material benefit 
to the militia and to the Commonwealth. 

I question the advisability of issuing passes to the general pub- 
lic on Sunday, especially at brigade camps. It was estimated that 
10,000 people were in the Second Brigade camp on Sunday, July 
21. The quarters of both officers and men were overrun with vis- 
itors, taxing the time and resources of the troops and disarranging 
the plans of the commissary officers. It must also be annoying to 
the inhabitants of the surrounding towns, and especially those of 
South Framingham, to have such a horde of people turning the Sab- 
bath into a holiday, with all its attendant noise and excitement. 

I present herewith a brief summary of the condition of the 
several organizations of the militia, as shown by the inspections by 
this department : — 

First Heavy Artillery. 

This regiment is in excellent condition, excepting batteries E 
and H, where the armory inspection developed the need of extra 
work to bring these two batteries up to the standard of the others. 

The attendance at armory inspection, while not up to that of 
camp and annual drill, was very good. The attendance of en- 
listed men at this tour of duty was as follows : Company A, 54 ; 
Company B, 52 ; Company C, 52 ; Company D, 57 ; Company E, 
54; Company F, 59; Company G, 55; Company H, 57; Com- 
pany I, 58 ; Company K, 54 ; Company L, 54 ; Company M, 60 ; 
average, 55J, out of a possible 60. 

Too much missing and broken property was reported by inspect- 
ing officers. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 15 

Camp and annual drill were performed by batteries at Fort 
Rodman, New Bedford harbor, First Battalion, July 20 to 27; 
Second Battalion, July 27 to August 3 ; Third Battalion, August 
3 to 10 ; the field and staff performing their eight days tour of duty 
by detachments or details. 

The excellent attendance was as follows : Company A, 55 ; Com- 
pany B, 57 ; Company C, 57 ; Company D, 58 ; Company E, 60 ; 
Company F, 60 ; Company G, 54 ; Company H, 60 ; Company I, 

60 ; Company K, 59 ; Company L, 56 ; Company M, 59 ; average, 
K711 

The artillery work was well performed, and much practical 
knowledge was gained in the use and care of the eight inch B.L. 
rifles. More instruction in signal details is needed, and preference 
given to artillery rather than infantry drill. According to the in- 
spectors' reports, infantry drill and ceremonies were good ; the 
battalions ranking third, first and second, respectively. Military 
courtesy very good ; guard duty fair only, owing in part to the 
number of recruits present. 

This regiment has great possibilities in its special branch of the 
service. How far these will be realized depends to a large extent 
upon the amount of assistance that will be given by the United 
States government. More text books and instruments are needed, 
and the detailing of a regular officer, as instructor, would be of 
inestimable value. 

Second Infantry. 

While the condition of this regiment is not all that can be de- 
sired, yet the inspection reports show a slight improvement over 
last year. Indifference and carelessness were noted, especially 
at camp. The personnel of both officers and men is excellent, 
and, with a little more life, enthusiasm and discipline infused into 
this command, its standing the coming year will be improved. 

The attendance of enlisted men at armory inspection was as fol- 
lows : Company A, 57 ; Company B, 49 ; Company C, 57 ; Com- 
pany D,- 55 ; Company E, 46 ; Company F, disbanded ; Company 
G, 55 ; Company H, 50 ; Company I, 45 ; Company K, 48 ; Com- 
pany L, 42 ; Company M, 56 ; average, 50iJ, out of 60, companies 
B, E, I, K and L falling below 50, thereby bringing down the 
average of the regiment. 

Company F of Gardner, having fallen below the standard of 
efficiency, was disbanded by General Orders, No. 3, Feb. 9, 1901, 
and a new Company F was organized at Pittsfield, under General 
Orders, No. 11, May 29, 1901. 

The inspection showed a vast difference in the condition of the 



16 ADJUTANT GEISTEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

several companies. Among the best were companies A, C and M, 
and among the poorest companies B, I and K. 

Property was in good condition, excepting mess kits. 

The attendance of enlisted men at camp and annual drill was as 
follows : Company A, 60 ; Company B, 56 ; Company C, 58 ; Com- 
pany D, 58 ; Company E, 51 ; Company F, 60 ; Company G, 60 ; 
Company H, 57 ; Company I, 55 ; Company K, 54; Company L, 
52 ; Company M, 57 ; average, 56-J. 

At Sunday morning inspection the rifles were found to be in a 
poor condition, being dirty and rusty, those of Company M alone 
being satisfactory; the same is true of their brasses. 

During the field manoeuvres the regiment gave a good account 
of itself, and much practical instruction was given in advance and 
rear guard work, scouting, marching over uneven country and fire 
discipline. Guard duty was well performed during the week. 
Policing of camp and quarters, unsatisfactory. A decided lack of 
uniformity in dress was noticeable, especially in companies E and 
L. 

The discipline, excepting at drill and mess, was very unsatis- 
factory during the week, singing and shouting after " taps " and 
discharging of rifles and crackers continued each night, despite 
any efforts the regimental or company commanders may have made 
to prevent it. 

Fifth Infantry. 

This regiment, having many new officers and recruits, did not 
appear to advantage at armory inspection. Enrollment was low 
and attendance poor. 

State property was in a fair condition, but many of the smaller 
articles of equipment were missing. A marked improvement was 
made before camp, and a much better condition in this command 
may be expected the coming year. 

Enlisted men present at armory inspection : Company A, 54 ; 
Company B, 45 ; Company C, 40 ; Company D, 33 ; Company E, 
42 ; Company F, 46 ; Company G, 39 ; Company H, 45 ; Company 
I, 47 ; Company K, 45 ; Company L, 50 ; Company M, 42 ; average, 
44. It can be readily seen that companies D, E, G and M lowered 
the altogether small regimental average ; 42 men in the regiment 
were absent with leave, and 69 without. Companies A, B and L 
were found to be in good condition ; F, C, H and K fair only ; D, 
E, I, G and M were in poor condition, especially D and E. More 
study and instruction are needed. 

The regiment gained rapidly in enrollment before camp, and the 
attendance was excellent : Company A, 60 ; Company B, 60 ; Com- 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 17 

pany C, 56 ; Company D, 55 ; Company E, 51 ; Company F, 50 ; 
Company G, 52 ; Company H, 55 ; Company I, 57 ; Company K, 
59 ; Company L, 60 ; Company M, 59 ; average, 56^-. 

A very satisfactory tour of duty was performed, lack of instruc- 
tion in guard duty being the most noticeable fault. Camp well 
policed. Discipline good except in one or two instances. While 
weak companies showed steady improvement over the armory in- 
spection, much remains to be done in companies D, E and M. 

Sixth Infantry. 

This regiment has done a good year's work, and were it not for 
one or two weak companies, would have a very high standing. 
Discipline was above the average. A little more snap and energy 
among the line officers will improve the command. 

Present at armory inspection : Company A, 59 ; Company B, 56 ; 
Company C, 60 ; Company D, 51 ; Company E, 46 ; Company F, 
50 ; Company C, 58 ; Company H, 41 ; Company I, 45 ; Company 
K, 32 ; Company L, 53 ; Company M, 51 ; average, 50 T 2 ^, com- 
panies E, H, I and K being much below the average. 

State property as a whole was in good condition, and the several 
companies, with the exception of Company K, passed a good in- 
spection. This company needs attention to bring it up where it 
belongs. It has an excellent armory and is in a large and flourish- 
ing town, and there is no excuse why it should not be up among 
the leaders. 

Attendance at camp and annual drill showed an improvement : 
Company A, 59; Company B, 60; Company C, 60; Company D, 
56 ; Company E, 60 ; Company F, 51 ; Company G, 59 ; Company 
H, 56 ; Company I, 59 ; Company K, 47 ; Company L, 60 ; Com- 
pany M, 53 ; average, 56 T 8 ¥ , Company K being the only company 
to fall below 50. 

Guard duty was fair only. Policing of camp not up to the re- 
quirements. Drills and ceremonies very satisfactory. Much at- 
tention was given to rifle practice during the year, which resulted 
in the regiment winning the tri-color and qualifying over 97 per 
cent, of its men, one of its companies, Company A, making the 
record score in regimental competition for the year. 

Eighth Infantry. 

This regiment shows a decided improvement over last year, and 
has performed very satisfactory tours of duty. The inspecting 
officer reports some defects in administration, and weak com- 



18 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

panies ; but a steady gain is noticeable, and the benefit of at least 
an occasional regimental camp was fully demonstrated. Despite 
inclement weather conditions, the regiment performed a very suc- 
cessful tour of duty. 

Enlisted men present at armory inspection : Company A, 45 ; 
Company B, 59 ; Company C, 56 ; Company D, 44; Company E, 
28 ; Company F, 44 ; Company G, 53 ; Company H, 51 ; Company 
I, 56 ; Company K, disbanded ; Company L, 47 ; Company M, 46 ; 
average, 49, companies A, D, E, F, L and M falling below 50. 

State property as a whole was in good condition. In drill and 
knowledge of duties the companies ranked as follows : excellent, 
companies B, C and H ; good, companies D, F, I and M ; fair, 
companies A and G- ; poor, companies E and L ; Company E es- 
pecially being in an unsatisfactory condition. This company 
showed a marked improvement in enrollment at camp, and it is 
hoped that its commander will succeed in putting it on a proper 
basis. 

Attendance of enlisted men at camp and annual drill : Company 
A, 43 ; Company B, 59 ; Company C, 57 ; Company D, 54 ; Com- 
pany E, 44 ; Company F, 48 ; Company G, 60 ; Company H, 58 ; 
Company I, 60 ; Company K, disbanded ; Company L, 53 ; Com- 
pany M, 51 ; average, 53 T 4 T . 

Camp sanitation was given particular attention, and many good 
ideas were demonstrated. The camp was completely ditched, 
petroleum used to disinfect the sinks, and a crematory constructed. 
Owing to the weather, the dispensing with tent floors and the care- 
lessness of some of the officers in looking after their comfort, the 
men were subjected to some hardships. 

Guard duty and ceremonies were performed in a satisfactory 
manner, with the exception of a few errors reported by the inspect- 
ing officer. Discipline good. 

Ninth Regiment. 

This regiment has made great improvement since last year, and 
its officers and men are to be commended for their efforts. There is 
much to be desired, however, to bring the regiment up to its proper 
place. It has capable and energetic officers, especially the field 
and staff, and I look for a steady increase in efficiency. 

Attendance of enlisted men at armory inspection : Company A, 
48 ; Company B, 50 ; Company C, 42 ; Company D, 41 ; Company 
E, 44 ; Company F, 53 ; Company G, 56 ; Company H, 54 ; Com- 
pany I, 53 ; Company K, 46 ; Company L, 58 ; Company M, 38 ; 
average, 48 T 7 ^ ; companies C, D, K, E and M being very unsatis- 
factory. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 19 

State property was not in good condition. Guard duty poorly 
performed. Non-commissioned officers need instruction, and fre- 
quent meetings should be held for this purpose. Discipline very 
good. Drills and ceremonies need to be improved. 

Company D, being below the standard of efficiency, was dis- 
banded by General Orders, No. 10, May 25, 1901, and the vacancy 
thus created remains unfilled. 

Attendance of enlisted men at camp and annual drill was very 
good : Company A, 53 ; Company B, 57 ; Company C, 56 ; Com- 
pany D, disbanded ; Company E, 54 ; Company F, 60 ; Company 
G, 52 ; Company H, 54 ; Company I, 55 ; Company K, 52 ; Com- 
pany L, 56 ; Company M, 58 ; average, 55 T 2 T . 

While there were some things to condemn, there was much to 
praise, owing to the earnestness with which both officers and men 
endeavored to do their duty. 

Roll calls were not well attended, and lack of promptness was 
noticeable. Policing of camp and care of quarters fair. Drills 
were of high order. Discipline could be improved. There was 
too much familiarity observed among officers and men. Guard 
duty was poor, not as good even as at armory inspection. More 
study and instruction should be given in this important duty. 

Naval Brigade. 
The report of the inspecting officer shows a very satisfactory 
gain in the condition of this command. Under its new commander 
a steady increase in efficiency is noted. 

Attendance at armory inspection : Company A, 45 ; Company 
B, 49 ; Company C, 41 ; Company D, 43 ; Company E, 43 ; Com- 
pany F, 54 ; Company G, 50 ; Company H, 54 ; Company I, 55 ; 
average of nine companies, 48f ; engineer division, 15 ; Signal 
Corps, 7 ; torpedo division, 3 ; companies A, B, C, D and E falling 
below 50. 

More attention should be given to State property, especially 
arms. Drills as a whole were well performed. Guard duty fair. 
Companies ranked as follows : excellent, companies F and I ; good, 
companies A, B, E, G and H ; poor, companies C and D. 

Company D, having fallen below the standard of efficiency, was 
disbanded Aug. 9, 1901. 

Camp and annual drill were held at Fort Rodman, New Bedford 
harbor, August 17 to 24 inclusive. Attendance was as follows: 
Company A, 54 ; Company B, 51 ; Company C, 49 ; Company D, 
disbanded; Company E, 53; Company F, 54; Company G, 55; 
Company H, 55 ; Company I, 56 ; average of eight companies, 53| ; 
engineer division, 13 ; Signal Corps, 11 ; torpedo division, 7. 



20 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 

More uniform instruction in guard duty is desirable. The camp 
was orderly. Discipline excellent. Policing very good. Military 
courtesy could be improved. Ceremonies were performed satis- 
factorily. The drills were very comprehensive, including infantry 
and artillery, boats under sail and under oars, and seamanship on 
theU.S.S. "Inca." 

Sub-calibre practice with the one pounder R. F. guns and prac- 
tice with service charges at about 1,900 yards range were held, 
with profit to the command. The work performed by the engineer 
and signal divisions was very satisfactory. 

First Corps Cadets. 

The First Corps maintains the high standing that has always 
characterized it. At armory inspection a slight decrease in en- 
rollment and attendance was noted. Inspecting officer reports an 
improvement in knowledge of guard duty and general instruction. 
Personnel of the command is of a high character. 

Attendance at armory inspection was as follows : Company A, 
45 ; Company B, 33 ; Company C, 49 ; Company D, 45 ; average, 
43. 

What little State property is in their possession is in excellent 
condition. 

Too many men were absent from Company C at this ordered 
tour of duty. The corps performed its tour of camp duty and 
annual drill at Hingham, July 12 to 20 inclusive. 

Particular attention was given to the building of a pontoon 
bridge over the creek in the rear of the camp. This work was 
successfully done, and with credit to the corps. More attention 
to military engineering would be of great advantage to the State. 
Guard duty, drills and ceremonies were performed in a satisfactory 
manner. Discipline and military courtesy were of the best. The 
systematic method adopted by the various departments in carry- 
ing on the work of the corps is specially commended. 

Attendance at camp and annual drill : Company A, 50 ; Com- 
pany B, 33 ; Company C, 62 ; Company D, 45 ; average, 47J. 

Second Corps Cadets. 

This corps is in a fair condition. It is suffering from small en- 
rollment, local conditions in Salem being partly to blame. A more 
thorough and systematic course of study in guard work and gen- 
eral duties will increase the efficiency of this command. 

Attendance at armory inspection was as follows : Company A, 
35 ; Company B, 37 ; Company C, 34 ; Company D, 30. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 21 

Books and papers were found in excellent condition. State 
property well cared for. The only criticism made by the inspect- 
ing officer was the condition and location of the overcoats. There 
were too many absentees from these inspections. 

The tour of camp duty and annual drill were performed at Box- 
ford, August 17 to 24 inclusive. Guard duty well performed. A 
lack of uniformity in care of quarters was noticeable early in the 
week. Drills and ceremonies well done, with little to criticize. 
The camp was noisy after "taps," and more rigid discipline is 
needed. The tour of duty performed by the band of this corps 
was unsatisfactory, they apparently having no conception of what 
was required of them except to furnish good music. Policing of 
camp excellent. Attention to details poor. Administration of 
the several staff departments excellent. What is needed is more 
discipline and attention to military details, and less to the social 
side of camp life. 

Attendance at camp was as follows : Company A, 37 ; Com- 
pany B, 37 ; Company C, 34 ; Company D, 40 ; average, 37. 

First Battalion Light Artillery. 

Both batteries are in fair condition. State property needs more 
attention. Some of it showed lack of care, and quite a lot of it 
is missing. Personnel good. Administration fair. Most of the 
books and papers at headquarters were inaccessible to the inspect- 
ing officer ; what were seen were incompletely kept. 

Attendance : Battery B, 62 ; Battery C, 67 ; average, 64J. 

The drills at camp were very good, and improved during the 
week. Discipline fair. Personal appearance of the men not satis- 
factory. They were allowed to be careless in their dress, and were 
slow in responding to calls. Military courtesy poor. Policing of 
quarters and stables good. These batteries should stand higher 
than they do, and more work can be reasonably expected of its 
officers. I would recommend that these batteries be given the 
same opportunity for target practice and road marches that has 
been given Light Battery A. 

Attendance at camp and annual drill : Battery B, 72 ; Battery C, 
78 ; average, 75. 

Battery A. 

This battery is in excellent condition. Equipment good, except 
canteens and haversacks. The fatigue caps were also unsatisfac- 
tory. Drills were very good. Instruction excellent. Adminis- 
tration very satisfactory. 

Attendance at armory inspection, 72 ; at camp and annual 
drill, 75. 



22 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

The battery performed its camp duty and annual drill at Sand- 
wich, July 13 to 20, inclusive, and a very successful and profit- 
able week was spent. Instructive drills were had during the week 
over rough country, without accident of any kind. Target practice 
with service charges gave good results. A bridge was constructed 
over a creek, which was an excellent piece of work. Attendance 
fair only. The personnel of this battery is of high order, and is 
under efficient and energetic officers. 

First Battalion Cavalry. 

This battalion is in good condition. Its equipment is not up to 
date, that of Troop A not being presented for inspection in the 
best possible condition. Carbines and sabres were clean. The 
sabres need repairing, or a new issue made. Books and papers 
well kept. Administration very good. Condition of armory ex- 
cellent. Drill good. 

Attendance at armory inspection : Troop A, 57; Troop D, 64 ; 
average, 60J. Attendance at camp and annual drill : Troop A, 
67 ; Troop D, 68 ; average, 67J. 

Inspection of quarters was not satisfactory early in the week. 
Drills and ceremonies well performed. Scabbards showed lack of 
attention. 

The troop marched to and from camp via Dedham and Wellesley 
Hills. Inspecting officer being unable to accompany them, no de- 
tails are at hand. The road map prepared by Corp. H. K. Bar- 
rows, Troop A, and the out-post map prepared by the adjutant, 
were accurate and instructive. Guard duty was well performed. 
Discipline and military courtesy excellent. The non-commissioned 
officers were somewhat slow in performing their duties. 

Troop F, Cavalry. 

This troop is in a fair condition. At armory inspection State 
property was found well cared for. The sabres, however, need 
repairing, or a new issue made. Books and papers were found in 
good form and well kept. 

According to the inspecting officer, the troop needs more instruc- 
tion in the finer details of military work. The men were not well 
posted in guard duty, insignia of rank and military courtesy, and 
need much instruction in these subjects. Knowledge of distances, 
intervals, guard mounting and squadron drill appears to be limited, 
and more attention to these matters should be given by both officers 
and non-commissioned officers. 

Attendance at armory inspection, 60 ; camp and annual drill, 79. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 23 

The troop marched to camp over the road, and arrived in good 
condition. Inspecting officer criticised the discipline maintained 
at camp. Lack of uniformity in dress was noticeable. The troop 
did excellent work during the field manoeuvres, and the men 
performed their duty in a businesslike manner. Roll call fair. 
Policing of camp and quarters excellent. Guard duty showed 
improvement over the armory inspection. These men can be de- 
pended upon to do good, hard work, and, with more discipline and 
attention to details, they will attain a high standing. 

Signal Corps. 

While the attendance at the ordered tours of duty was satisfac- 
tory, yet, owing to lack of equipment, the corps is not in a satis- 
factory condition. What equipments they have are well cared 
for. The personnel is not up to the standard expected. Books 
and papers neat and well kept. Lack of instruction in the smaller 
details of military work was very apparent, for which the officers 
should be held responsible. 

Attendance at armory inspection : First Corps, 24 ; Second 
Corps, 25 ; average, 24J. 

At the camp of the First Brigade the corps performed its duties 
as well as could be expected. The men constructed a telephone 
system, connecting headquarters with the several organizations. 
Men were prompt at roll calls, but should give more attention 
to personal appearance. Policing of camp and care of quarters 
excellent. 

The tour of duty performed by the detachment of the Second 
Brigade was not as satisfactory as that of the First. It took them 
much longer to construct the telephone system, men were slow in 
responding to roll calls, and military courtesy was unsatisfactory. 
Policing of camp and care of quarters excellent. Personnel could 
be improved. 

If the Signal Corps is to be retained as a part of the Massachu- 
setts militia, it is absolutely necessary that it be provided with a 
better equipment. They need torches, field glasses, heliographs, 
nippers, pole climbers and wire, also a new set of flags. I would 
also recommend that sabres be issued to both detachments. I 
trust that this matter will be given consideration at an early date, 
as at the present time the State is not getting value received. 

The detachment of the Second Brigade did not hold its annual 
drill at camp, but performed the same at Wakefield, on Satur- 
day, November 16. The day's work was entirely unsatisfactory. 
Lack of preparation, together with unfavorable weather condi- 



24 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

tions, made the day's work a distinct failure, insufficient time in 
preparing for the day's tour of duty being given. The stations 
selected were not suitable, which, with lack of equipment, gave 
very disappointing results. I would suggest that a copy of the 
topographical map of the State be furnished both detachments. 

Ambulance Corps. 

At armory inspection State property was found in good condi- 
tion, excepting the belts and pouches, which were old and worn 
out, and should be condemned. The belt plates, and other metal 
parts of the equipment showed lack of care. Drills were not satis- 
factory, although that is of minor importance, compared with their 
other duties. Administration good. Discipline not quite up to 
standard. 

Attendance at armory inspection, 44 ; camp and annual drill, 59. 

Members of the corps performed their duties in a satisfactory 
manner. More promptness in attending roll calls is desirable, 
and attention should be given to the set-up and personal appear- 
ance of the men. 

I regret to note the retirement of Capt. Myles Standish, the effi- 
cient commander of the corps. 

As prescribed by paragraph 566 of the regulations, the follow- 
ing suggestions for the improvement of the militia are respectfully 
submitted : — 

I. That regimental and battalion camps be held throughout the 
militia the coming year. 

II. The issue of a dress uniform to all troops. 

III. The careful inspection of all brigade and regimental head- 
quarters, giving particular attention to books and papers, to 
secure more uniformity in keeping same, thereby bringing the 
system as near that of the regular service as possible. 

IV. That field officers exercise more careful supervision over 
companies in the armory, reporting promptly to their superior offi- 
cers everything requiring correction. 

V. That regimental commanders scrutinize monthly drill re- 
ports carefully. 

VI. More attention to instruction in guard duty in the armory. 

VII. Greater attention to military courtesy and knowledge, 
and, as a help to bring about the desired result, that there shall be 
issued to every non-commissioned officer in the M. V. M. a copy 
of the U. S. Drill Regulations, and Guard Manual to every enlisted 
man liable to such duty. That the Adjutant General's report be 
furnished to all headquarters and companies ; at present they are 
furnished officers only. Also, that all headquarters and com- 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 25 

panies be furnished with books of instruction, such as U. S. Drill 
Regulations, Wagner's Security and Information, Army Officer's 
Examiner, Customs of the Service, Manual of Military Field Engi- 
neering, Manual of Court Martial, Quartermaster's, Paymaster's 
and Subsistence Manual, and such others as may be deemed ad- 
visable. 

VIII. That one or more meetings of all officers in the M. V. M. 
be held in Boston each year for instruction, and that regular army 
officers be invited to give talks on important military subjects. 

In conclusion, I wish to express to you my appreciation of the 
assistance and advice you have extended to me, and my gratitude 
for the loyal support given me by the officers of this department, 
who, by their earnest, painstaking service and soldierly bearing, 
have made all duty a pleasure. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM H. BBIGHAM, 

Inspector General. 



26 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



EEPOET OF THE SUEGEON GENEEAL. 



Surgeon General's Office, Boston, Dec. 31, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Samuel Dalton, Adjutant General of Massachusetts, 

Sir : — I have the honor herewith to present my report for the 
current year. 

The work of this office has increased to a considerable extent 
during the past year, owing to the transfer to my department of 
moneys to defray the expense of surgeons for examination of re- 
cruits. This caused the opening of a new set of books and the 
disbursement of some $2,100. 

The refitting of medical chests for the use of the troops while in 
camp was attended to the first of the year, everything being put in 
readiness for service, and issued to the various regiments and bat- 
talions at the proper time. The care of all property belonging to 
this department, and the issue of the same to the surgeons while 
in camp, was also attended to. You very kindly constructed a 
storehouse for the use of the medical department, where medical 
property, such as tents, tent furniture and the like, when not in 
use, is stored. This, I feel sure, will prove to be beneficial, as the 
Surgeon General will now be able to more readily trace property 
that has been lost. The forwarding of medical supplies, tents, 
etc., to troops at New Bedford and also the Second Corps of 
Cadets and Eighth Regiment at Boxford necessitated labor here- 
tofore unnecessary. This work was done cheerfully, and I believe 
it to be an improvement upon the old method of disbursement of 
medical supplies by the armorer at Framingham. 

The examination of soldiers and sailors of the wars of 1861 and 
1898 has been attended to, eighty-five having come up for exami- 
nation. This was ten less than in 1900. The men who come here 
are growing old and are less able than, formerly to work, and there- 
fore more needj^. This work gives me as much pleasure as any 
connected with the duties of the office. 

In the early spring the water supply at Framingham was inspected 
by a medical board appointed by the Adjutant General, consisting 
of the Surgeon General, Lieutenant Colonel Marion and Lieutenant 
Colonel Devine. The report of the board, as submitted to the 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 27 

Adjutant General, was that the use of the water from Leonard's 
Pond be discontinued, and that a supply of water be procured from 
the pond supplying South Framingham and controlled by the South 
Framingham Water Company. This water is filtered after the 
manner recommended by the Surgeon General in his report last 
year, the filter being situated near shore of pond. I heard no 
complaints of this water during the encampments last summer. 

In the last days of May and the first of June, by the order of 
His Excellency Governor Crane, I attended the annual meeting of 
the Association of Military Surgeons of the Army and Navy at 
St. Paul, Minn. This was one of the most successful meetings of 
the, association where I have had the honor to be present. The 
papers read before the meeting treated of military surgery and 
medicine. All of the papers were of interest to military men, and 
the subjects were well presented and received with favor. The 
people of St. Paul showed the members of the association much 
attention, and altogether it was a very instructive and enjoyable 
occasion. The association is in a very prosperous condition. The 
society meets next June in Washington, D. C. I would recom- 
mend that the mileage be furnished to all of our surgeons who may 
be desirous of attending this meeting. It would be money well 
expended. Gur volunteer surgeons would be greatly benefited, 
coming in contact, as they would, with surgeons of the regular 
army and navy and national guards, who have had experience in 
the war of the rebellion, Philippines, in Cuba and on the sea during 
the Spanish-American war. I trust this recommendation will be 
favorably received and acted upon. 

The duty of inspecting all the camps, with the exception of two 
battalions of the First Regiment, was attended to. I have noth- 
ing but praise to offer in regard to these inspections. The sinks 
at the camp ground at Framingham are old (they were built in 
1884) and not in good condition, these buildings having become 
saturated by their long use ; and it requires a great deal of atten- 
tion to keep them in proper shape. This can be done with a suffi- 
cient supply of lime and earth, but it is expensive. To my mind, 
the plan pursued by the Eighth Regiment in the care of their camp 
refuse and sinks was near perfection. The water filter of this 
command was more elaborate than was necessary, but it answered 
the purpose. The cremating plant was an entire success. Alto- 
gether, this was one of the best camps that I have seen. It, in 
fact, was a duplicate, with some improvements, of the Eighth Regi- 
ment camp at Lexington in 1898. 

The sanitary condition of the First Brigade camp was good. 
The Second Brigade camp was fine. The neat appearance of the 



28 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

medical officers and their prompt attendance on inspection were 
very noticeable. These were altogether model camps. In the 
First Regiment camp in the battalion I had the honor to inspect I 
found everything in excellent order and the sanitary conditions 
good . 

The food which was issued to the troops in the field tbis year 
was, as last year, of excellent quality, and, as far as my observation 
goes, well cooked. The method of supplying rations to our militia 
at the present time is about the best that could possibly be had. 
General Wellington deserves much credit for the jnanner in which 
he has carried out the idea of furnishing our soldiers while in camp 
very nearty as they would be furnished if in the field. This is as 
it should be. I believe, as this is simply a school for the soldier, 
everything pertaining to the instruction of troops, their clothing, 
food, shelter, the sanitary conditions, should all be carried on as 
nearly like the actual thing in the field as possible ; and the nearer 
we come to this in this school, the better will the men be fitted to 
do the duty of the soldier when called into active service. Men 
should be taught to cook their own rations, to put up their own 
tents, to take care of their clothing and equipments, — in fact, learn 
to care for themselves in the best possible manner ; they should 
be lectured on hygiene by the surgeons, and taught the duties of 
a soldier as far as health goes. To be a good soldier a man must 
be strong and well. It is very essential that a man should learn 
to shoot, but it is equally as essential that a man should learn to 
care for his health while campaigning. I believe this subject of 
the training of our Massachusetts militia in hygiene and care of 
the health of men the most important thing after marksmanship 
coming before our officers, one and all. The nearer we train our 
soldiers as they would be trained in the field, the more efficient 
body of men we will have to fight our battles when the country 
calls. 

It is a very easy matter to keep a camp like Framingham in a 
thoroughly sanitary condition. If the sinks are old, it only requires 
more work and more lime and earth to put them in good sanitary 
condition. We should build sinks of suitable size of brick, laid in 
cement, and cover these sinks with cheap wooden houses made of 
planed boards, with good floors and properly constructed seats, 
we would then have about the best thing for such a camp as 
we have at Framingham. The houses should be made cheaply, 
so that they might be removed every two or three years and new 
ones built. The principal trouble with the present structures is 
that the buildings have become saturated with urine and are no 
longer fit for use. The temporary buildings which I have proposed 
could be replaced when necessary at small expense. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 29 

The school for medical officers, held in the South Armory, 
March 28, was fully attended, and the papers read were of more 
than ordinary interest. I believe these schools to be instructive to 
all of our officers, and I propose to continue them, having one or 
more the coming year. The attendance of the officers on these 
schools was very creditable. 

Three medical officers, Lieutenant Colonel Marion, Lieutenant 
Colonel Devine and Major Foster, were appointed as a board to 
meet and decide what changes, if any, should be made in our 
medical papers. They performed their duty faithfully, and re- 
ported that we should follow the regular army by having our papers 
conform to papers of that army as far as possible. This recom- 
mendation was approved, and it will be carried out to the letter. 

The duties of the veterinary surgeons, as usual, were performed 
in a very satisfactory manner. The resignation of Dr. Peters 
is a loss to the service and to the State. He was a man of long 
experience, and had no doubt saved the State many dollars in the 
care and inspection of the horses before and while in camp. Per- 
sonally I regret his retirement very much. We cannot afford to 
lose the services of such men. I have before recommended that 
the two officers now veterinary surgeons be promoted to the rank 
of captain ; and I again recommend that the present veterinary 
surgeon, Dr. Osgood, and Dr. May, after five years of service, be 
made captains and transferred to the brigade staff, and that two 
additional veterinary surgeons be appointed, with the rank of first 
lieutenant, to take their places. 

We have gotten on with very little unnecessary loss of medical 
property during the year, and I am pleased to say that the medical 
officers have taken pains to prevent the loss of property which was 
entrusted to their care. 

The examination of recruits by our surgeons is progressing very 
satisfactorily. I think that the physical condition of the Massa- 
chusetts militia was never better than at the present time. The 
officers examined by the Medical Board, by my own personal 
knowledge, receive a thorough physical examination. They re- 
ceive not only a physical examination, but a very thorough 
examination as to their qualifications in medicine, surgery and 
hygiene. This examination is no sinecure. It is a thorough, 
practical examination, which tests fully the qualifications of the man 
examined. The Medical Board, as now constituted, Lieutenant 
Colonel Marion, Lieutenant Colonel Devine and Major Dearing, 
are very thorough in their work, and I desire to express my 
thanks to them for the manner in which they have performed their 
duties. 

By orders I have attended His Excellency Governor Crane or 



30 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

Lieutenant Governor Rates some twenty times on various functions. 
This has been a pleasure, and of much benefit to me. 

A complete report of the examination of recruits by our surgeons, 
the number examined and the cost of examination, is submitted, 
and will be found appended to this report. 

In paragraph XVI., General Orders, No. 6, series of 1899, 
surgeons were required to make examination of recruits twice each 
month in the regiment to which they belonged. Believing, after 
trial, that this was unnecessary, it was recommended to the 
Adjutant General that the order be changed to make it read once 
each month instead of twice each month. In General Orders, 
No. 9, paragraph X., the change was made. This order was not 
fully understood, and an additional circular was sent out to each 
surgeon, explaining that the meaning of this order was that each 
company of each regiment and each battalion, or, in other words, 
every company in the Massachusetts militia, should have the 
privilege of a physical examination by a surgeon take place in 
that company once each month. It was advised in this circular 
that where one or more companies of a regiment or battalion meet 
in the same armory, that the physical examination of recruits 
should take place in all of those companies on the same night of 
each month. This would save expense. I trust the surgeons will 
follow out these instructions to the letter. 

The Ambulance Corps still continues to keep up its record of 
efficiency. The resignation of Capt. Myles Standish from the 
Massachusetts militia and from the command of this corps made a 
vacancy which was very hard to fill. Lieutenant Bell was recom- 
mended by Captain Standish for the position, and he was immedi- 
ately promoted to the rank of captain and assigned to the command 
of the Ambulance Corps. As he is an old and tried officer, I feel 
that he will do his duty as commander, as he has done in a subordi- 
nate position. I regretted very much that Captain Standish felt 
obliged to ask for a retirement. His name and the name of his 
corps had become known all over the country and in Europe. 
It is one of the most efficient corps to be found, and I think it is 
not inferior to the best medical corps, outside of the regular army, 
and, as far as my experience goes, the equal of any corps in that 
army. I trust that we shall be able to keep up the efficiency of 
this corps to the high standard to which it has heretofore attained. 
I desire to tender to Captain Standish my sincere thanks for the 
efficient manner in which he has always done his duty, and I would 
say that I believe no more honest, straight-forward, high-toned, 
well-equipped gentleman is to be found in any volunteer service. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 31 

Very cordial relations continue to exist between this department 
and the medical department of the regular army. Surgeon General 
Sternberg and his assistants have been very kind to us, and we 
fully appreciate the honor. 

December 15 I was detailed, as medical officer, to attend the 
Lieutenant Governor and party on a visit and unveiling of the 
monument at Andersonville, Georgia. The party started from 
the South Station Monday at nine o'clock, and arrived home on 
Sunday morning at about ten o'clock. This, with the exception 
of an accident which happened to our train, it being run into by a 
freight train some miles below Salisbury, N. C, was an enjoyable 
trip. Our route was by the way of Asheville, Chattanooga, Atlanta 
and Macon, Ga. We visited the battle-fields of Chickamauga, 
Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain, spending a good part of the 
day at Chattanooga and vicinity. The members of the party enjoyed 
good health on this trip, and they had very little use for the exten- 
sive supply of medicines and surgical instruments which I procured 
and took on the trip. Heretofore I had always used, when attend- 
ing the Governor on journeys, a small trunk which I found in the 
office fitted up for this work, but which was rather primitive. I 
procured, some little time before this last trip, a leather bag for 
instruments and medicines, also had a small wooden trunk made 
to carry bandages, operating case of instruments and splints and 
all such paraphernalia, the whole making a pretty serviceable kit 
to take on tours of this kind. I found it very convenient, and I 
trust useful to the members of the party. 

Great improvement was noted in some of the regiments in the 
manner in which the surgeons and assistant surgeons and hospital 
stewards presented themselves before the inspecting officer on his 
annual inspection. Every medical officer appeared in his proper 
dress, which is full uniform and side arms, to receive the inspector. 
This was very gratifying to me, as I had seldom seen it before in 
our militia. I trust that in our next annual encampments there 
will be no reason for the slightest criticism of medical officers. I 
feel that I can say that there has been a steady improvement from 
year to year in our medical corps. 

Recommendations . 

Sleeping quarters should be supplied for the cooks and helpers 
about the kitchens, in tents or otherwise. No men should be 
allowed to sleep in the mess houses. This must be prevented. 

The hospital should be moved up the camp, farther away from 
the camp of the Ambulance Corps. 



32 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 

I would increase the bathing facilities of the camp at Framing- 
ham. 

Prompt report should be made to the Surgeon General of all 
accidents to men or horses while in camp or on the march. This 
is of great importance. 

I am strongly in favor of learning to use crude petroleum oil in 
sinks and about camps, not only as a disinfectant, but as a sure 
death to flies. I was told by the chief surgeon of Chickamauga 
camp that the use of crude petroleum settled the fly question at 
once ; they had no more trouble with that pest. If that is the case, 
we should be thoroughly instructed in the safe use of this com- 
modity, and, where desirable, make use of it. In ordinary camps, 
where flies are not troublesome, I believe that a sufficient quantity 
of earth is the best thing that can be used in sinks, and, in fact, 
all that is necessary. It is much cheaper than lime or any other 
substance, and entirely satisfactory, as far as my knowledge goes. 

In closing, I desire to express my thanks to His Excellency Gov. 
William Murray Crane for his kindness to me personally, and for 
his interest in the medical department. 

. I also desire to again acknowledge my obligations to General 
Dalton for his willing help to me in all cases where I needed 
assistance. He has always been most kind. 

Colonel Capelle has again and again given his valuable advice 
to us, when we called upon him to do so. I again desire to thank 
him. 

To the medical officers of my department I here desire to thank 
them one and all for their attention and ready obedience to instruc- 
tions and suggestions from me, and also the gentlemanly manner 
in which they have always performed the duties devolving upon 
them. 

To Mr. S. S. Bradford I am under obligation for the efficient 
manner in which he has done his work in the office and at camps, 
where he has had charge of disbursements of medical supplies of all 
kinds. 

EOBERT ALLEN BLOOD, 

Surgeon General, Massachusetts. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 33 



Personnel. 

Promoted, — rank of lieutenant commander and surgeon, lieutenant 
(J. G.) and assistant surgeon : — 

Harry M. Cutts, Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 

S. Virgil Merritt, Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 
Promoted, — rank of captain, first lieutenant and assistant surgeon : — 

Herman W. Gross, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 
Commissioned, — rank of major and surgeon : — 

Charles W. Galloupe, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 
Commissioned, — rank of captain and assistant surgeon : — 

Francis Magurn, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 
Commissioned, — rank of first lieutenant and assistant surgeon : — 

David Cheever, First Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 

Benj. F. Sturgis, Jr., Second Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 

Henry L. Bearing, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

Joseph S. Hart, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

J. White Cummin, Battery A, Light Artillery, M. V. M. 
Commissioned, — rank of lieutenant (J. G.) and assistant surgeon : — 

Dennis F. Sughrue, Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 

Orland R. Blair, Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 
Commissioned, — rank of first lieutenant and veterinary surgeon : — 

Arthur W. May, First Battalion Cavalry, M. V. M. 
Resigned, — lieutenant commander and surgeon : — 

Gardner W. Allen, Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 

Harry M. Cutts, Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 
Resigned, — captain and assistant surgeon : — 

Henry D. Chadwick, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

Walter K. Jewett, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 
Resigned, — first lieutenant and assistant surgeon : — 

George C. Littlefield, Second Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 

Daniel F. Jones, First Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 

Hugh Cabot, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 
Retired, — rank of lieutenant colonel : — 

Maj. Charles C. Foster, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 
Retired, — rank of captain : — 

Capt. Myles Standish, Ambulance Corps, M. V. M. 

First Lieut. Austin Peters (veterinary) , First Battalion Cavalry, 
M. V. M. 



34 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

Number examined for State aid in this office during the year 1901, 85 
Physical examination of recruits : — 

Number examined by surgeons and assistant surgeons during 

the year 1901, 2,285 

Amount paid for physical examinations, . . $2,166 30 
Average cost per recruit, 94— f- 

Board of medical examiners : — 

Lieut. Col. Otis H. Marion, president. 
Lieut. Col. William H. Devine. 
Maj. Howard S. Dearing, recorder. 

Number of meetings during the year 1901, 28 

Number of examinations by this Board (medical officers), . . 14 
Number of examinations by this Board (other officers) , . . . 138 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 35 



EEPOETS OF MEDICAL OFFICEES. 



Headquarters Fibst Brigade, M. V. M., 
Boston, Mass., Aug. 1, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. R. A. Blood, Surgeon General, M. V. M. 

Sir : — I have the honor to make a report on the tour of duty of 
the First Brigade, M. V. M., which took place at the State camp 
grounds, South Framingham, from June 21 to 28 inclusive. 

On arriving in camp, a careful inspection was made of camp 
grounds, buildings, cook houses, water supply and sinks ; also a 
written report was required of senior surgeons of commands, on 
condition of the same as they found them, so that if any defect 
was found or anything needed it might be corrected or supplied at 
once. They reported : " Everything in excellent condition except 
the sinks, which were same as last year." Special note was made 
of water supply, it being clearer, with greater force and giving 
better satisfaction, than former water supply. 

I found everything in a fairly good condition from a sanitary 
point of view. Some of the buildings are much in need of repair, 
although a fresh coat of paint made them look very well. Brigade 
headquarters are in a fair condition ; brigade hospital fair. Mess 
halls are in good condition, and serve their purpose well. Cook 
houses are in good condition, with the exception of serving boards, 
many of which are in poor condition, with wide cracks and rough 
surfaces made so by being constantly cut on ; the cracks and rough 
surfaces are filled with particles of food, which is liable to decompo- 
sition. 

The storehouses seem to be all right, but the condition about 
them, especially in the rear on the first day of camp, was bad ; 
mattresses, straw, boards, bottles and all sorts of rubbish were 
scattered on the ground, thrown out probably by companies getting 
out their property. 

The sinks are in the same poor condition that they have been for 
the past several years ; the vaults are cracked and falling to pieces ; 
in their present condition it is impossible to keep them in proper 
sanitary form. 



36 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S KEPORT. [Jan. 

The water which is used by the town of Framingham was intro- 
duced on the State camp grounds in June, 1901, and the pipes 
flushed for a week previous to the encampment of the First Bri- 
gade ; this cleared the pipes in a measure from rust, which gave 
clear water with sufficient force for all purposes, and the opinion 
along the line was that it was a great improvement over the other 
system, which had been outgrown by time and the demands of 
sanitary science. 

The weather for the most part during the week was pleasant, 
but extremely hot, the thermometer registering above 90° for 
several days. There were heavy showers with thunder and light- 
ning Saturday morning and evening, June 22. The hot wave com- 
menced Tuesday, June 25, and lasted during the remainder of the 
encampment, with extremely high temperature at times. Owing 
to the extreme heat, drills and ceremonies were abandoned during 
the week. Wind mostly from south-west. 

The brigade performed the part of its work designated the 
"march out" with a soldierly instinct; the officers and men 
evinced ability to grasp the situation, to care for themselves under 
varied conditions, and to accept the lot of a soldier in the field. 

The advance guard, under command of Troop F, left camp Mon- 
day morning, June 24, at 8 o'clock, followed a little later by 
Colonel Clark's command ; they proceeded by easy stages to 
" Pegan Hill," where they bivouacked for the night, acting as the 
defence. The main body, under command of General Mathews, 
left camp about an hour later, and proceeded to "Indian Head 
Farm," where it camped for the night. This was an ideal spot, on 
the western slope of a large pasturage land, with plenty of good 
spring water for the men, a brook for the horses, and near by 
flowed the Charles, in which the men could bathe. Monday night 
there was a slight shower, but no ill effect was experienced. The 
baggage train was kept in close proximity to the column, so that 
the men were served promptly and abundantly with rations. 

Tuesday morning camp was broken about 8 o'clock, and the 
march taken up for Pegan Hill. I remained behind with a medi- 
cal officer from each organization and a detail from the pioneer 
corps to look after the policing, and see that sinks and kitchen 
pits were filled and left in proper condition. 

The sham battle took place during the forenoon, and ended about 
11 o'clock in victory for the attacking party. The heat was quite 
intense, and as a result three cases of prostration were reported 
and cared for by the Ambulance Corps, who erected a temporary 
shelter for them ; the men recovered quickly, and in a short time 
were able to join their commands. The march home was tedious, 
the weather being extremely hot and the humidity great. Several 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



37 



men were allowed to take cars at Natick for Framingham, on 
account of sore feet, due to bad-fitting shoes and marching in the 
hot sand. 

Frequent halts were made. At Natick, when the entire column 
was shaded by the massive elms along the highway, a halt of half 
an hour was made ; at 3 o'clock the column moved, and reached 
camp about 4.30 p.m., somewhat fatigued, but exemplifying the 
fact that Massachusetts troops of to-day are better able to take up 
the hardships of campaign than ever before. 

There were no accidents or sickness during the two days' march, 
and only a few fell out on account of exhaustion or sore feet. 
Three men were sent back to Framingham in the ambulance from 
Indian Head Farm, more as a precaution rather than extreme 
necessity. 

There were fewer excuses from duty on account of sickness or 
indisposition during the encampment than ever during my service 
of eighteen years as a medical officer. There were no cases of 
sunstroke, and only a few cases of heat prostration, which fully 
recovered in a short time. This, I think, may be accounted for 
by the better physical condition of the men, the manner of ration- 
ing them and the care they take of themselves during camp. 

Excused for sickness during the week : — 



In Troop F, . 

In Light Battery, . 

In Sixth Regiment, 



84 



In Second Regiment, 
In Ambulance Corps, 
In Signal Corps, . 



31 
1 

1 



Three accidents occurred during the encampment, which were 
reported at once to your office, none of which were serious. 

The present system of rationing the troops is well-nigh perfection, 
and reflects great credit on the Commissary General, Gen. F. W. 
Wellington. The food was excellent, well chosen in variety, 
abundant in quantity and very well cooked. Cook houses were 
orderly and clean, consequently the food was appetizing. An 
inspection of the food, before and after cooking, was made every 
day by the medical corps, and they report that everything was in 
excellent condition. 

The bathing facilities should be enlarged and improved ; they 
are inadequate and poorly planned. 

The brown tents were a great comfort to the men, the bright 
glare of the sun was excluded, and the men could lie in them with 
comfort to their eyes. 

The various organizations carefully policed their quarters and 
that part of the camp grounds in front and rear of same. The 
entire grounds were excellently policed and clean at all times, 
owing to the vigilance of the regimental and battalion surgeons. 



38 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

Under the present conditions, the sinks required a vast amount of 
care ; with such materials as were at hand, and with almost con- 
stant attention, they were kept in fairly good order ; I believe it 
is impossible to keep the present sinks in excellent condition. 
With the appointment of a sanitary sergeant from each company, 
as suggested in a paper which I read before a military body last 
year, the whole matter of camp sanitation and the finding out of 
certain diseases and peculiarities of the men would be much easier, 
and the commanding officers as well as the surgeons would derive 
great benefit from the knowledge obtained from the sanitary 
sergeant. 

A half-hour talk was given to the men of each organization on 
" first aid to the injured," by the surgeons and assistant surgeons, 
during the encampment. Much interest and enthusiasm were 
manifested, with a desire for more instruction on the same subject. 

I would suggest that the money required to make needed repairs 
be put into new buildings, constructed on modern military and 
sanitary plans. 

Mess halls should not be used for barracks for cooks and ser- 
vants, and storage places for mattresses. There should be con- 
structed a building for servants' quarters, the lower part of the 
building to be used as mess hall, the upper part for sleeping apart- 
ments. 

Serving boards in the cook houses should be of plank, eighteen 
inches wide, of one piece, so fitted that they could be taken out 
each clay, scrubbed and dried in the sun ; after each encampment 
they should be planed off, as recommended last year. 

The present sinks should be abolished. They are in bad condi- 
tion ; the vaults are cracked and tumbling down ; the ground 
around them is getting saturated with excreta. The sink at bri- 
gade hospital used by the Ambulance Corps should be abolished 
at once. The Ambulance and Signal Corps should use the same 
sink, as recommended last year. The rail system for sitting on, 
as at present constructed, is bad. Hundreds of men sit on the 
same rail year after year, without its being scrubbed or cleaned. 
For each sink there should be two or more rails, if rails are to be 
used ; or two or more planks with holes in them, if planks are to 
be used, for the men to sit on. After one rail or plank has been 
used for a day, it should be taken out, scrubbed with germicides, 
and left in the sun and air for twenty-four hours ; a clean one 
should be put in place every day. There are several good sanitary 
systems for sinks, one of which should be adopted, unless there 
can be a sewer system put into the camp grounds, which to my 
mind would be the safest and cheapest in the end. It is the 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 39 

unanimous opinion of the surgeons of this brigade that something 
should at once be done to improve the conditions of the sinks. 

No person at any time should be allowed to throw rubbish from 
the storehouses onto the ground. It should be taken by the detail 
getting out company property to a place designated as rubbish 
heap, and burned at once. Old mattresses and rubbish of every 
kind were scattered about in rear of storehouses, by whom I know 
not ; it was a source of great annoyance and considerable trouble 
to get it disposed of, all of which should have been attended to by 
the persons responsible for the same, without the interference of 
the medical department. 

The guard house should be whitewashed inside every year ; the 
cells should be scrubbed with some disinfectant ; the shed in the 
rear should be whitewashed inside ; all sinks should be whitewashed 
inside every year. 

The street and the dusty ground adjacent to it in rear of cook 
houses should be carefully sprinkled several times a day, as a pro- 
tection not only to the street but to the men and the food. It is a 
well-established fact that dust laden with germs is a great menace 
to health. 

There should be a crematory at the rear of each organization, 
where all rubbish, including offal from the kitchens, should be 
burned three times a day. 

The State should purchase a wagon for use of medical depart- 
ment ; it is needed for distributing medical supplies. It could be 
used for transportation of hospital supplies as needed, and in case 
of need used as an extra ambulance. I would suggest that a 
regular army ambulance be secured ; it would answer for every 
purpose desired ; then, in case of both brigades being ordered out, 
each brigade would have an ambulance. 

A visit to the camp of First Regiment Heavy Artillery, at Fort 
Rodman, Aug. 9, 1901, was made. On inspection, the sanitary 
conditions were found to be in very good shape ; sinks and kitchens 
well located. The hospital and business tent were well located and 
in excellent condition. Kitchens and mess tents were clean and 
orderly. 

In closing my report, I wish to say that I am greatly indebted 
to the surgeons of the brigade for their untiring efforts to do their 
duty and do it well, and for them I have only the highest praise. 
To you, sir, I wish to extend my thanks for the prompt and gener- 
ous manner in which all my demands upon your time and office 
have been complied with. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Otis H. Marion, 
Lieutenant Colonel and Medical Director. 



40 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



Headquarters Second Brigade, M. V. M., 
Boston, Aug. 14, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Robert A. Blood, Surgeon General, Massachusetts. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of medi- 
cal department, Second Brigade, M. V. M., for the tour of duty 
performed at South Framingham, July 20-26 inclusive. The 
weather was favorable for military duty. The highest temperature 
noted was July 22, when the thermometer reached 93° in middle of 
the afternoon. A slight rain fell the same day, but not enough to 
interfere with drills. Wednesday, July 24, although temperature 
not excessive, the weather was so uncomfortable that it was con- 
sidered advisable to shorten infantrv drill one-half hour, otherwise 
the duties were carried out according to regular routine. 

Everything relating to sanitation approached perfection, and 
this was due in large measure to the fact that soldiers detailed for 
the purpose assisted in care of sinks, policing and other duties, to 
improve camp hygiene. This sanitary detail consisted of one 
corporal and four privates from each battalion, and was provided 
for by Special Orders, No. 9, dated July 20, 1901, issued from 
brigade headquarters : "A daily detail, consisting of one corporal 
and four privates, will be made from each battalion ; these men 
will report to surgeon of their respective organizations at such hour 
as the commanding officer may direct, for instruction in elementary 
camp hygiene. This detail will aid in everything pertaining to 
sanitation, and will be excused from all other duties." The detail 
was formed on the same lines as that of the Eighth Infantry at its 
last annual tour of duty, but with this difference, that our details 
were made up from new men each day, in order that a large num- 
ber of soldiers might be instructed in cause and prevention of 
contagious disease and camp hygiene. With five men from each 
battalion, fifteen from a regiment, assigned each day, and instructed 
in sanitary matters, you have, at the end of a seven-day tour, one 
hundred and fifteen soldiers from each organization educated and 
capable to co-operate with medical officers to promote health of 
command. Good results are sought for not only by teaching the 
officers and enlisted men what they must do in order to preserve 
health in actual service, but also to really prevent contagious dis- 
ease in militia camps. It is hard to make some militia men realize, 
or induce them to take serious views of, the importance of preven- 
tive measures at a summer encampment of a few days, and this 
can only be done by instructing officers and enlisted men on the 
subject. Carelessness in sanitary measures may be productive of 
disease, which does not appear in the short time while militia 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 41 

organization is in camp, but nevertheless might appear in members 
of the brigade days or weeks after their return to civil life. In 
campaigning, the results are evident while on the field, and conse- 
quently it is easier in active service than in militia camps to im- 
press on soldiers the importance of sanitation. I am informed by 
medical officers that men assigned for sanitary work at this camp 
took hold in earnest, and were willing to do what might be consid- 
ered menial work, when they realized the importance of it ; and 
that many of them looked upon the work in the light of an honorary 
detail. 

The sinks were kept in as fine condition as possible, considering 
that the buildings and vaults are old and thoroughly saturated with 
urine and fseces. Fresh earth and lime were used to cover stools, 
and the individual method of covering stools was carried out to a 
great extent. A sign on each sink requested each person using 
sink to cover stool with earth. A box of earth and small shovel 
in each sink made this requirement easy. I believe fresh earth is 
all that is required to cover sinks ; but with old vaults, and wood- 
work polluted by long use, the free use of antiseptics is not only 
required but absolutely necessary. Captain Landy, superintendent 
of State arsenal, co-operated with us, and his men covered sinks 
with earth several times a day, and in the intervals the care was 
intrusted to sanitary detail. A great point in the care of such 
privies as we have at Framingham is to see that the stools are 
covered before they can cause odor, and before flies have an oppor- 
tunity to carry disease from excreta to food. This method of 
requiring soldiers to aid in care of sinks is far more satisfactory 
than the old method of leaving the sanitary work entirely to civil- 
ian employees at arsenal. It is much more efficient service, and 
calls soldiers' attention to the importance of sanitary matters. 
The old sinks have outlived their usefulness, and new ones should 
be constructed before another year. Men detailed for sanitary 
work also performed nurse duty in regimental hospitals, and thus 
supplied a long-felt want. The instruction given to sanitary detail 
will be supplemented in the fall by course on " first aid." I be- 
lieve that crude petroleum is an excellent preparation for sinks. 
The agent has been adopted in the United States army for the 
destruction of mosquitoes and their larvse. I obtained satisfactory 
results from its use at headquarters sink, but think that perhaps 
its use may be unsuitable for camp at Framingham, on account of 
the inflammable nature of petroleum, and the number of frame 
dwellings in close proximity to place where it might be used. 
Some petroleum was used on swamps back of camp, with the idea 
of destroying mosquitoes and their larva?, but I am unable to state 



42 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

whether productive of any results. One barrel of petroleum was 
destroyed by fire, which was apparently of incendiary origin. 

Bath houses still remain in bad condition, and I recommend that 
they be repaired, and improved facilities furnished. Leonard's 
Pond is no longer used as a source of drinking water for troops, 
and I would suggest the desirability of considering the use of the 
pond for bathing purposes. A bath house could be placed on the 
beach which is now used by bathers, and with proper precautions 
the danger of drowning accidents could be eliminated. The princi- 
pal objection to bath house at this pond is that it is rather remote 
from camp, but its natural advantage would more than offset this 
disadvantage. 

The medical officers aided me, and I can say that every one did 
his duty in an earnest manner. Lieut. Austin Peters, veterinary 
surgeon, had a case of suspected glanders in a horse, and took 
every care to prevent its spread. 

I turned over to Captain Standish of Ambulance Corps a com- 
plete outfit, including hospital tent, bedding and everything re- 
quired for accommodation of one patient. The idea of this plan 
was to have an isolation tent which could be promptly pitched and 
equipped for any contagious case. If occasion required, I would 
designate its position on the field, and a man from the Ambulance 
Corps would be detailed to care for the patient until disposed of. 
I think an outfit like this fulfills indications on field for care of con- 
tagious cases. Fortunately, we did not need this tent. The health 
of section where brigade encamped has been first class, only one 
case of typhoid being reported in town of Framingham for present 
year. As near as I could judge, the water supplied by the town 
was excellent. The conditions of quarters in rear of Ambulance 
and Signal Corps require attention. A cesspool would catch over- 
flow from pumps, and prevent unsightly appearance caused by pools 
near the fence. 

Enclosed you will find meteorological chart from observations 
of Signal Corps. Have not heard from medical officers, but will 
forward their reports as soon as received. Requisitions for medi- 
cal supplies were promptly furnished from your office. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

William H. Devine, 

Lieutenant Colonel and Medical Director, 

Second Brigade, M. V. M. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 7. 43 



Headquarters First Corps of Cadets, M. V. M., 
Boston, July 22, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Robert A. Blood, Surgeon General of Massachusetts. 

General : — I have the honor to submit the report of the medi- 
cal department of the First Corps of Cadets, M. V. M., for the 
tour of duty in camp at Hingham, ending Saturday, July 20, 1901. 
The command reached Hingham in the late afternoon of July 
12, and immediately took up the camp routine prescribed in the 
standing orders of the commanding officer. In the night of July 
11 to 12 there had been a heavy rainfall in Hingham, and the 
camp ground was in excellent condition. Except on Saturday, 
July 13, and on Friday, July 19, the weather was very hot, the 
temperature reaching 92° F. in the shade on July 16. The com- 
manding officer thought it prudent to omit battalion drills on the 
da}^s of extreme heat. With this exception, the regular routine of 
duty, including the building of a pontoon bridge and outpost duty, 
was performed by the men in comfort, owing to the fact that this 
command has a rough-service uniform, consisting of blue flannel 
shirt and canvas trousers, with leggings and campaign hat, as well 
as the khaki uniform adopted prior to the camp of 1900. To the 
use of these uniforms is largely to be attributed the fact that the 
men were able to do a large amount of work without being over- 
come by the heat. In the afternoon of July 1 7 there was a thun- 
der shower of two hours' duration, with a precipitation of .7 of an 
inch. There was also a light shower in the early morning of July 
18, and a wind squall, followed by a succession of brief showers, 
in the late afternoon. 

The health of the command was excellent throughout the camp. 
There was the usual number of cases of constipation and other 
minor ailments ; but the excuses from duty were fewer than in any 
camp I have ever attended. There were only two cases in hospital : 
one private was in bed for twenty-four hours with gastritis and 
debility from the heat ; and a sergeant sustained a sprained ankle 
at battalion drill on July 18. This latter case received appropri- 
ate treatment until the morning of July 19, when it seemed best to 
send the man home to complete his convalescence. 

In company with the officer of the day and the quartermaster, a 
thorough sanitary inspection of the camp was made by me every 
morning. Particular attention was paid to the kitchen, servants' 
quarters, bath houses and sinks ; the latter were disinfected several 
times a day with earth, sulphate of iron and crude carbolic acid. 

As in the last two camps, this command subsisted on the garri- 



44 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 

son ration of the army. The food was of excellent quality, was 
well cooked and gave entire satisfaction. 

I enclose a copy of the meteorological observations, which were 
taken by Lieut. David Cheever, assistant surgeon. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant* 

Charles M. Green, 

Major and Surgeon. 



Headquarters Second Corps Cadets, M. V. M., 
Salem, Mass., Sept. 1, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Robert A. Blood, Surgeon General. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
tour of duty performed by the Second Corps Cadets, August 17 to 
August 24 inclusive. 

The command left Salem promptly at 8.30 per special train, and 
arrived at the camp grounds in Boxford on schedule time. The 
work of pitching camp was immediately commenced, and this was 
done in short order, due to the systematic manner in which it was 
performed. The weather during this tour of duty was all that 
could be desired, and, aside from a few complaints and minor 
injuries, the health of the command was excellent. The sanitary 
condition of the camp was excellent. A daily inspection was 
made by the medical officers, and their recommendations were 
promptly acted upon. The usual precautions were taken to deodo- 
rize the sinks. The food was simple, wholesome and well cooked, 
and satisfactory to everybody. 

During the tour two companies went out at intervals over night 
and did outpost duty. Among other things, shelter tents were 
pitched, supper and breakfast were cooked, sinks were dug, and 
the men in general were taught how to take care of themselves in 
the enemy's country. 

This tour of duty, on the whole, having for its primary object 
military instruction, was satisfactory, and the zeal and earnestness 
with which the men enter upon and perform this duty is creditable 
to them. 

I am, very respectfully, 

J. William Voss, 
Major and Surgeon, Second Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 45 



Headquarters First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., 
Boston, Aug. 27, 1901. 

Lieut. Col. Otis H. Marion, Medical Director, First Brigade, M. V. M. 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit herewith the report of the 
medical department of the First Regiment of Heavy Artillery for 
the tour of duty performed at Fort Rodman, New Bedford, Mass., 
from July 20 to Aug. 10, 1901. 

The regiment went into camp by battalions, each in turn serving 
a week. My detail was with the first ; Capt. W. A. Rolfe, first 
assistant surgeon, with the second ; and Lieut. Jos. Stedman, 
assistant surgeon, with the third. The reports of Captain Rolfe 
and Lieutenant Stedman of their respective tours of duty are in- 
cluded with this, with copies of the morning sick report. 

The First Battalion, under command of Major Dyar, entrained 
at the South Union Station, and journeyed by special service, steam 
and electric, to the camp, without accident. 

The camp site was in excellent condition. In pitching the tents 
much more room was allowed than in previous years because of the 
less number of men ; and a less number of men were assigned to 
a tent than formerly, all of which, from a sanitary point of view, 
was a marked improvement. 

• The weather was excellent during the entire week. At that time 
the whole country was experiencing a season of unusually hot 
weather, but with the south-west winds from off the bay we had a 
delightfully cool atmosphere, which was gratefully appreciated. 
There was practically no sickness, barring a few cases of sunburn 
and diarrhoea. Lieutenant Mudge of Battery G came to camp a 
sick man, having suffered from diabetes for about two years. At 
first he seemed to be better, but by the fifth day he developed 
obstinate constipation and nausea and other severe toxic symptoms, 
so that it was thought advisable to remove him to St. Lukes 
Hospital in the city of New Bedford. The police ambulance was 
kindly placed at our service, and he was carefully moved to the 
hospital. I am told he rapidly developed diabetic coma, and died 
on the 29th of July. 

Daily inspections of the camp were made, with special regard to 
the policing, the condition of the sinks, the cook houses and the 
food. The general policing was excellent. The sinks were well 
located and well looked after. They consisted of trenches, dug 
four feet deep, and fresh earth was thrown on the deposits each 
day ; unslaked lime was also used every day. 

The food served to the men was in most instances prepared by 
the battery cook, and was fresh and wholesome, and very satis- 



46 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

factory. As much cannot be said of the water supply, except that 
there was plenty of it. But as it came to the men it was full of 
sediment, and had a disagreeable taste, so that it did not seem 
suitable for drinking purposes. The pipes were said to be account- 
able for this condition rather than the source o£*the supply. How- 
ever that may be, it should be looked after, and, if possible, 
remedied before another encampment. The soldiers complain, with 
reason, that they cannot drink it ; and it seems plausible that the 
water supply ought to be as good as that supplied to New Bedford, 
which is apparently all right. All the drinking water for head- 
quarters was imported. 

The adoption of the khaki uniform for the entire regiment it is 
believed would be a step in the right direction, from a sanitary as 
well as an economic point of view. 

There was very little intoxication, no case coming directly under 
the care of the medical department. 

The physical examination of recruits has been carried out care- 
fully and faithfully, and i3 believed to be prolific of much good to 
the regiment in more than one way. A single instance will aptly 
illustrate. About six weeks before camp a man presented him- 
self for examination who was found to be suffering from the initial 
lesion of syphilis. He would have come to camp in good time to 
infect others of his battery who were obliged to mess with him. 

If the present plan of encampment, viz., by battalions, is to be 
followed in the future, it is recommended that there be three 
hospital stewards appointed, one for each battalion, instead of one 
for the entire regiment. The present hospital steward, in addition 
to his regular duty, volunteered and served at his own expense an 
extra week of duty, and should receive due credit therefor. Ser- 
geant Keene of Battery A, a fourth-year medical student at Har- 
vard, rendered faithful and very acceptable service as acting 
hospital steward. 

The hospital tents and medical supplies were ample. The tents, 
particularly, were much appreciated by several patients who were 
under treatment there. 

This department is also pleased to testify to the value of the 
new dark brown tents which the State issued to the troops for the 
first time this season. 

Very respectfully yours, 

Howard S. Dearing, 

Major and Surgeon, 

First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 47 



Boston, Sept. 4, 1901. 
Maj. Howard S. Dearing, 

Surgeon, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
tour of duty of the Second Battalion of the First Regiment Heavy 
Artillery, at Fort Rodman, Mass., from July 27 to August 3 inclu- 
sive. 

The camp grounds, sinks, mess and cook houses, which were 
vacated by the First Battalion, were found in excellent condition, 
and the weather conditions for the entire tour were perfect. 

For the first two days of the tour there was hardly any sickness 
among the troops, then diarrhoea commenced to develop quite 
rapidly. In my opinion, this was due in part to the change of diet 
and water, and also to the usual indiscretions in eating and drink- 
ing. The water supplied to the camp was, in appearance at least, 
poor. It had a distinctly yellow color, and the taste was tarry, 
evidently due to the fact that the conducting pipes had been but 
recently laid. 

Great trouble was experienced in keeping the sinks in good, 
clean condition. On my arrival I found seats built over the 
trenches, but evidently the men would not use them in the usual 
manner, but would stand on them, with the consequence that before 
long they presented a filthy appearance. Careful policing did not 
seem to remedy the trouble, so it was decided to do away with the 
seats, leaving nothing but a rail to sit on, and in that way a better 
appearance was possible. On the whole, the condition of the sinks 
was poor for the whole tour. Chloride of lime and fresh earth 
were used in the trenches. 

The cook and mess houses were kept in a clean condition, and 
the food was wholesome and good. No accidents of any kind 
occurred. Upon the completion of the tour, the keys to medi- 
cal chests, books, etc., were turned over to the medical officer of 
the Third Battalion. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

William A. Rolfe, 
Captain and Assistant Surgeon, 
First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M. 



48 ADJUTANT GEKEKAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



Boston, Sept. 1, 1901. 
Maj. Howard S. Dearing, 

Surgeon, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, Boston, Mass. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following medical report 
of the Third Battalion, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, during 
their tour of duty from August 3 to 10 inclusive. I found the 
camp in excellent condition as regards sinks, kitchens and grounds, 
vacated by the Second Battalion. The weather during the week 
was on the whole fine. There were one or two afternoons when 
we had more or less rain with heavy winds, but the tent flues re- 
mained dry, and the men were not inconvenienced thereby. 

The health of the command was on the whole good. There were 
a number of cases of vomiting and diarrhoea, caused probably by 
change of food and manner of living, and possibly the frequent 
habit of the men going in swimming immediately after a meal, 
which it is practically impossible to prevent their doing. Would 
it be practicable to issue an order suggesting to the men the inadvis- 
ability of going into the salt water for at least two or three hours 
after a meal, and giving the physiological reasons for the same ? 
This possibly would appeal to a large number, and would prevent 
many cases of intestinal disturbances. There were no accidents 
of a surgical nature during the week. 

The camp was well policed by Sergeant Potter and an efficient 
squad. The sinks were covered with earth and lime three times a 
day, an hour or two after eating, as most of the men used the 
sinks immediately after eating. Thus they were kept clean and 
comparatively free from odor. The kitchens were kept in good 
condition and the food as far as possible protected from flies and 
sun. 

There are a few suggestions I would like to offer that are 
prompted by my observations of the camp during the week : — 

First, in regard to the sinks. It seems to me that the simple 
rail with protecting boards in front is all that is necessary, and 
they can be kept much cleaner. Then, if a small place is reserved 
at one end for a urinal, and marked as such, it would prevent the 
frequent careless wetting of the rail the men have to sit on. 

Second, in regard to the place where the men have to wash their 
faces and hands. At present there are several faucets placed for 
their use, and the constant flow of water and dripping have made 
a perfect quagmire, thus discouraging the men from using them, 
as it is impossible to reach the faucets without walking through 
mud and water. I would suggest a trough dug, running the whole 
length, a foot or two wide, under the spouts, and six or nine inches 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 49 

deep, filled with loose stones, and a platform of three or more 
boards half an inch apart, built four or six inches above it. This 
would always be in good condition, and much appreciated by the 
men. 

Third, in regard to the water spouts at the rear of the kitchens. 
As it is at present they drip on the ground, making it muddy and 
slimy ; and, although the cooks have dug shallow trenches, trying 
to carry it off into the field, yet they are entirely inadequate for 
the purpose. Also, the dirty water and slops are thrown haphazard 
over the field in the rear of the kitchens, causing at times more or 
less odor. Would it not be practicable to have two or more cess- 
pools dug, fifty or more feet, at rear of the kitchens, and have a 
drain from the kitchen spouts to them, either a trench sufficiently 
deep to carry the water, or, better still, a small drain pipe laid 
from them to the cesspools, then all refuse water and slops carried 
to the cesspools, and possibly gradually filled in? This would 
prevent the whole area behind the kitchens being made a general 
dumping ground. I would suggest buckets, also, being kept under 
the faucets, to take the overflow and drip of water, on a small plat- 
form over the drain. 

I noticed, in one or two kitchens, oil cloth on the serving board, 
which seems to me an excellent idea, as it can be easily cleaned, 
and the food and bread kept better ; as the rough boards absorb 
much, and it is almost impossible to keep them looking clean after 
a while. Also, some form of covering, as, for instance, netting, 
to keep over the food and bread to preserve them from the flies. 
The food furnished to the men was good and wholesome, and they 
were well satisfied with it. 

On breaking camp, the sinks were well filled in and the grounds 
thoroughly policed. 

Respectfully, 

Joseph C. Stedman, 
Assistant Surgeon, First Regiment Heavy Artillery. 



Boston, Aug. 7, 1901. 
Lieut. Col. Wm. H. Devine, Medical Director, Second Brigade, M. V. M. 

Sir : — I have the honor to present the following report of the 
tour of duty of the Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M.,«at South 
Framingham, July 20 to 27, 1901. 

The regiment, with the exception of four companies, embarked 
at the South Station, Boston, at 8.45 a.m., Saturday, July 20, 
companies F and C boarding the train at Newton, and companies 
I and M joining the command at South Framingham. Lieut. EL 



50 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

S. Dearing, second assistant surgeon, and myself accompanied 
the regiment, and Captain Magurn, first assistant surgeon, arrived 
at camp at 11 o'clock p.m. The weather was comfortable, and the 
journey pleasant and uneventful. On the march to the camp 
ground route step was adopted the greater part of the way, to 
avoid fatiguing the men, who were in heavy marching order, with 
overcoats rolled in collar. 

The tents were not pitched in advance, with the exception of the 
hospital, which was in readiness with its equipment on our arrival. 
Fifteen minutes after the regiment came on the field the medical 
stores were unpacked, the red cross flag flying, and the hospital 
was prepared for any surgical or medical demands. During the 
day there were a dozen or more calls for minor ailments, chiefly 
headache and nausea. At about 6 o'clock Private H. Mellette of 
Company F dislocated his left shoulder, while wrestling. He 
stated that the same accident had occurred four times previously, 
and requested that ether be given. As he was in a highly excit- 
able state, I thought best to administer it, when the dislocation 
was easily reduced, and a Velpeau bandage applied. Three days 
later, however, all apparatus was removed by him without my 
knowledge and contrary to my advice, and he voluntarily returned 
to duty. No other surgical cases of importance occurred until 
July 24, when Private R. F. Piper of Company F, while playing 
base ball, received a compound dislocation of the last phalanx of 
the right thumb. The wound was made aseptic, the dislocation 
reduced and splint applied. Healing by first intention followed, 
and the thumb was in excellent condition when he left camp, with 
orders to report to Surgeon Magurn in Charlestown in a few days. 
Five cases of slight sprains of the wrist, elbow and ankle occurred, 
and three cases of wounds and abrasions of the hands. Three men 
had old wounds of the hands that required dressing, and three 
cases of blistered feet were treated. Two men who had previously 
suffered from rheumatism in the ankles claimed that they were 
disabled by an increase of pain and stiffness. On July 20, Private 
O. G-. Moyse of Company F was brought to the hospital suffering 
from chill and great prostration ; and on July 23 Private Fred New- 
comb of Company C, in a state of collapse, with abdominal pain 
and feeble, irregular pulse. The ambulance was called into requi- 
sition later to transport these men to the railroad station, and also, 
on the evening of July 25, to carry to the brigade hospital a pri- 
vate of Company E who was very noisy and violent from alcoholism, 
and could not be controlled in his tent. Only two such cases 
occurred during the entire tour of duty. On July 23 Private C. P. 
Hoffman of Company A reported to me with a history of acute 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 51 

inguinal hernia an hour previous, caused by violent exercise. This 
he had reduced himself, and at the time of my examination there 
was no sign of rupture. He was relieved from duty for two days, 
with orders to report at once if any signs of a return appeared, 
which, however, did not occur. The medical cases consisted almost 
wholly of headache, vomiting, diarrhoea and constipation, — aver- 
aging fifteen or twenty a day during the first three days, and fewer 
afterwards. There was no case of typical heat prostration, and 
the headache and digestive disturbances seemed to me to be due to 
fatigue from lack of sleep, unaccustomed hard work and mental 
excitement, and not to indiscretion in eating and drinking. Such 
cases were almost wholly absent during the last few days of camp, 
after the men had become acclimated. On July 24 I had the unu- 
sual opportunity of stating in the morning sick report " every man 
on duty," out of a command of 768 men. The remarkable free- 
dom from sickness during the week I attribute, first, to the intelli- 
gence and good intentions of officers and men; second, to the 
excellent quality of food provided ; and third, to the absence of 
strong liquors and unlimited iced u soft drinks" in the tents. 

At the request of Lieutenant Colonel Devine, a class in camp 
sanitation was organized, as follows : At 10 o'clock each morning 
a detail of one corporal and four men from each battalion reported 
to me at the hospital. These fifteen men were given a half-hour's 
practical talk on camp sanitation and the prevention of disease. 
This body of men was known as " the sanitary detail," and their 
duties were to act as inspectors of the sanitary condition of the 
cook houses and sinks, and as hospital attendants. The lecture 
aimed to impress upon the men four important points in camp 
hygiene. First, the sterilization of drinking water, to prevent 
typhoid and other diseases. Second, the removal of all decompos- 
ing animal and vegetable matter, to prevent the development of 
the bacteria of disease. Third, the construction and care of sinks, 
with the theory of wet and dry disinfectants. Fourth, the dangers 
of stagnant water, and the use of petroleum to prevent the propa- 
gation of malaria by mosquitoes. It was my intention to add each 
day to this lecture special instruction on any emergencies that 
might arise from excessive heat or other cause, using the hospital 
cases as a clinic, but there was no occasion to do so. The "sani- 
tary detail " was divided as follows : One corporal and four men 
were on duty at a time, serving four hours on and eight hours off. 
Two men remained at the hospital as medical assistants, one was 
on duty at the sinks, and one on the line of cook houses, while the 
corporal had general supervision. While on duty they wore bras- 
sards which served to indicate their authority to the cooks and 



52 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

workmen. As the detail was changed each day, by the eDd of the 
tour of duty ninety men had received the instruction and had 
attended to the practical duties described. It gives me great 
pleasure to report that the men universally enjoyed this duty, and 
showed great interest in the matter of practical sanitation, using 
intelligently the copperas, lime and dry earth as disinfectants. As 
a matter of administrative detail, I soon found that it was unneces- 
sary to have men on duty at the sinks and cook houses after 10 
o'clock p.m., and this patrol was omitted until 6 o'clock a.m. The 
detail going off duty at 10 o'clock p.m., as. a last duty threw into 
the sinks an abundance of lime and earth, rendering them odor- 
less through the night. The petroleum provided at the opening 
of camp was removed the second day, on account of its inflamma- 
bility and consequent danger to stables and storehouses, and also 
because, under the conditions existing on the muster field, it did 
not seem to be a necessary disinfectant, and could be omitted with- 
out detriment. 

The hospital equipment and medical supplies were most satis- 
factory, only two or three articles requiring replenishment. Special 
requisition was made for tincture of iodine and a two-inch spool of 
adhesive plaster, which were useful in several cases of intercostal 
and lumbar pain. 

The sanitation of the camp was almost perfect. I wish to testify 
to the hearty co-operation of the cooks in keeping the kitchens 
clean, in removing refuse and garbage, and in covering food from 
flies and insects. The use of the Framingham water, of known 
purity, rendered the boiling of drinking water unnecessary. The 
sinks were well cared for, dry earth and lime being thrown in 
twice a day by workmen, while a notice suggesting the immediate 
covering of stools with dry earth was very generally complied with. 
While the work was thoroughly done and with gratifying results, 
I should recommend the destruction of the present sinks before 
another encampment, as, during the many years they have been in 
use, the brick vaults have been encrusted with material, the earth 
beneath and around saturated with liquids, and the woodwork 
permeated with moisture and odors that cannot be corrected by a 
coat of paint. Freshly dug sinks, with new structures of cheap 
material that could be destroyed after each camp, would be more 
easily kept in order, and more in accordance with modern ideas of 
sanitation. 

In addition to the lectures to the sanitary details, at the request 
of Colonel Oakes I gave a practical talk to the officers in the 
marquee at 11 o'clock a.m., July 24, on the same subject. On the 
following day Surgeon Magurn addressed them on the subject of 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — ISTo. 7. 53 

heat stroke, syncope and hemorrhage ; and on the day after that, 
Surgeon Dearing spoke to them on personal hygiene, bathing and 
diet. These talks were well attended, and the officers expressed 
themselves as interested and instructed by the information given, 
which was in each case of a purely practical nature, and based upon 
the personal experiences of the surgeons. 

With a view to more thorough and practical instruction of the 
entire command, I should favor another year a separate regimental 
camp, located in new country, where the men could personally 
attend to the drainage of the ground, to the sterilization of drink- 
ing water, to the construction and management of sinks, to the 
removal and destruction of garbage, to the use of petroleum and 
other disinfectants of special use, to the use of field cooking appar- 
atus, and many other details of camp sanitation. Locating such a 
camp on the seashore or on a pond or river would render daily 
bathing of the entire command convenient and attractive to the 
men, thereby impressing upon them a very important matter of 
personal hygiene, which they could continue in civil life, and act 
as missionaries of the doctrine of cleanliness to the entire com- 
munity. The daily bath is particularly desirable in the case of 
men who practically wear the same clothing day and night for 
eight days ; and the bath houses on the muster field are patronized 
but little, as they are not conveniently situated and not attractive. 
If the nature of the ground allowed it, a valuable medical experi- 
ence could be obtained by locating one battalion in the woods, one 
in an open field and one on the seashore, at slight distances apart. 
A comparison of the hygiene of such camps with reference to 
drainage, protection against insects, exposure to heat and cold, 
construction of sinks and other local conditions would furnish 
information that would be useful in the location and management 
of future camps in peace or in war. 

In this connection I should hope that a recommendation of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Devine, in his report for 1900, calling attention 
to the importance of having at hand at least one medical officer 
who should be an experienced operating surgeon, would be made 
imperative. In regimental camps, especially when located away 
from large cities which could supply hospital facilities in case of 
necessity, there should 'be an operating surgeon, and if the com- 
mand as organized did not contain such an officer, one who is capa- 
ble should be detailed, to assume charge of important surgical 
cases. The Commonwealth would be many times reimbursed for 
the additional expense, if one such injured person should present 
later a claim for damages, and the State could offer expert testi- 
mony of proper treatment at the start. 



54 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my great obligation to Colonel 
Oakes for his cheerful support of the medical department in all its 
requests, and my indebtedness to surgeons Magurn and Dealing 
for their uniform co-operation, as well as for the high degree of 
medical skill exercised by them. I think all the men who consulted 
the surgeons realized that a kindly mode of treatment is not incon- 
sistent with the dignity and respect due their superior officers ; and 
the absence of all friction between the medical officers and com- 
pany commanders is evidence of reasonable and gentlemanly con- 
duct on both sides. I wish also to compliment Sergeant Plummer r 
hospital steward, for his constant attention to duty and his skill in 
assisting and dispensing. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles W. Galloupe, 
Major and Surgeon, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 



Headquarters Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. r 

Salem, Aug. 7, 1901. 

Gen. Robert Allen Blood, Surgeon General, M. V. M. 

General : — I have the honor to submit the following report of 
the medical department of the Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., 
covering the operation of the department during the annual tour of 
duty in July, 1901. 

Early in this year permission was sought for this regiment to 
hold an independent regimental camp. Orders finally were issued 
from the Adjutant General's office, ordering this regiment to camp 
in Boxford. The tour of duty extended from July 6 to July 13, 
the regiment electing to hold the annual drill and camp together. 
The site chosen in Boxford was the site used by troops in the civil 
war, and is in a pasture adjacent to the camp ground now used by 
the Second Corps of Cadets. 

The troops arrived early in the morning of July 6, the larger 
number coming on special train. Two companies, Company A 
coming on the regular train and arriving early, and Company F 
coming from Haverhill to Georgetown in electric cars and march- 
ing from Georgetown to Boxford, arrived in camp during a severe 
shower, and were soaked with rain ; no sickness, however, resulted 
from this. The remaining nine companies arrived soon after 9 on 
special train from Salem ; no sickness was reported, and no acci- 
dents. The men pitched their own tents, and immediately began 
making camp. 

Company I of Lynn marched over the road from Lynn, about 
twenty miles. In consequence of this long march, a number of the 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 55 

men suffered from sore feet, and one case of exhaustion was noted 
in this company, the individual, however, recovering in a few 
hours. 

The camp was spread out over a very large area, greatly in con- 
trast to the small area occupied by one regiment at South Framing- 
ham. All the work of making camp, policing and care of sinks 
was done by the men, necessitating a good deal of hard work to 
be performed by each individual during every day of camp. In 
spite of this unusually hard work there was practically no sickness 
during the camp : one man in the hospital five days, sick with tonsi- 
litis ; two men suffering with sore feet, confined to quarters ; and 
one man with badly sunburned arms, in quarters, — these five cases 
comprise the sick report for the week. 

The food for this camp, issued by the regimental commissary, 
was of excellent character, liberal in amount, and well cooked by 
the company cooks. 

The water was drawn from artesian wells on the site of the Sec- 
ond Corps Cadets camp ground, and hauled in barrels, in wagons, 
to the company streets, cook houses and headquarters. This water 
was excellent, and, in consequence of its good quality, almost no 
cases of diarrhoea were noted, — this being in strong contrast to 
the condition always observed at Framingham. A boiled-water 
plant, such as was used in this regiment in the service, and in 
which enough water was boiled to supply one company, was in 
operation during all of camp. This boiled-water plant was used 
to exemplify an easy and complete method for boiling, filtering and 
cooling water, and could easily have been amplified to such an 
extent as to supply the whole regiment with boiled water. 

Sinks were built by the regiment, consisting of trenches twenty 
feet long, four feet deep and two feet wide, surmounted by build- 
ings, in which were seats for the men, and urinals. Seats and 
urinals were covered with board covers, so arranged as to remain 
closed when not in use. Disinfectants — lime and crude petroleum 
— were used in each sink three times a day. The use of these 
disinfectants was absolutely effectual in keeping down all odor in 
and about the sinks. In the course of many inspections, I did not 
at any time detect the slightest odor of faeces or urine. The sinks 
were dug only four feet deep, believing that in this very porous and 
sandy soil a greater depth would not be necessary. It was found 
that all fluid did immediately soak away into the ground in this 
way ; but four feet was hardly depth enough for an eight days' 
camp, and I should recommend at least six feet, even in porous 
soil. 

All the garbage, wet and dry, was burned in a garbage crematory, 



56 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 

and was absolutely disposed of in this way ; no refuse, no odor and 
no collections of flies. 

A regimental canteen was established, in which was sold the 
best quality of beer to enlisted men only. The men, knowing that 
there was to be a canteen, brought with them almost no hard 
liquor. It is a notable fact that during this camp I saw only two 
intoxicated men. Heretofore, in the militia camps which I have 
attended, I have seen on the first two days of camp all the way 
from six to sixty men very much the worse for liquor, and I have 
no doubt liquor of an extremely bad character. The men, know- 
ing that beer was to be obtained in camp, brought, as I say, no 
liquor apparently, and, being perfectly free to go to the canteen 
whenever they desired, did not desire to go very often. I fully 
believe in, and endorse, the canteen idea as carried out in this 
camp. 

This camp was the healthiest camp I have ever seen. I attrib- 
ute this fact to a number of causes : first, physical examination of 
recruits, by which weak men are excluded from membership in the 
regiment; second, the high quality and simplicity of food and 
the excellent cooking ; third, abundance of pure water ; fourth, 
the spreading out of the camp over a large area; fifth, the absence 
of hard liquor in camp, due to the influence of the knowledge of a 
legitimate supply of beer. 

In this camp were used, for the first time in my experience, the 
brown, tropical tents. These I believe to be a very great improve- 
ment over the ordinary white canvas tents, being in the time of 
bright sunlight and heat an efficient protection from the sun's rays, 
and, through the process to which the canvas is subjected, water 
tight. 

The weather during this camp was in the main fair and warm, 
there being three days during the camp when occasional showers 
and one storm made drills impossible. In spite of the fact that no 
tent floors were used, trenching about the tents was found to fur- 
nish ample protection from a heavy fall of rain, tent bottoms being 
dry at all times. While this might not work in some soils as well 
as in Boxford, it was found here to answer every requirement. 

Camp was broken Saturday, July 13, all men able to do duty 
and marching out of camp to embark on train at 2 p.m. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Thomas L. Jenkins, 
Surgeon, Eighth Infantry, M. V. M. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 57 



Headquarters Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., 
Boston, Aug. 1, 1901. 

Lieut. Col. Wm. H. Devine, Medical Director, Second Brigade, M. V. M. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit my report for the annual tour 
of duty and fall drill of the Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., 
at South Framingham, from July 20 to 27 inclusive. 

First four days in camp were very warm. After four hours of 
steady rain on the morning of the fifth day, the remainder of the 
week was pleasant and cool. What little sickness there was, were 
a few minor ailments, such as acute indigestion, headache and con- 
stipation, due to change of diet and surroundings. 

There were several accidents. The first of importance was Pri- 
vate Joseph A. Sullivan of Company M of Lowell. While running 
a race with a comrade, he ruptured the attachment of the lliacus 
muscle from the inner border of the crest of the ilium, resulting in 
his inability to flex the thigh upon the pelvis or to bring the leg 
forward when standing. He was placed in regimental hospital, 
ice bag placed on seat of injury and rest in bed. Previous to regi- 
ment leaving camp, July 27, he was transferred in ambulance from 
camp to Framingham, via train to his home in Lowell. The follow- 
ing day Lieutenant Gillow, Company M, learned that he was not 
having the proper care, and he was sent to the Carney Hospital, 
where he is at present. July 24 Private Alfred Hill, Company F, 
while playing ball, received a sub-glenoid dislocation of left shoulder, 
which was easily reduced. July 27, while striking camp, Corporal 
Smart of Company B, was struck in abdomen by corner of tent 
floor, rendering him unconscious. After gaining consciousness, he 
was carried in ambulance to train, and accompanied his company 
to the Union Station, Boston, from which he was transferred in a 
carriage to his home in South Boston. 

In regard to drinking water, a contract was made to supply each 
company with Pequot Spring water, which proved very satisfactory. 
A large barrel was placed in a tent in each company street, two at 
headquarters and one at the hospital. They were kept filled with 
water cooled by ice to a very agreeable temperature. Much credit 
is due the Pequot Spring Company for the very careful and hygienic 
manner of handling the water. Food was of good quality, and 
better cooked than at last encampment. Sanitary detail rendered 
valuable service in everything pertaining to the cleanliness of the 
camp. Was unable to complete course of instruction in first aid 
work, but will do so at an early date. 

The sinks are in a deplorable condition, and it is almost impossi- 
ble to keep them in a sanitary state. The vaults are crumbling 



58 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

and unsightly. They should be repaired, or, better still, built Dew. 
In the rear of mess houses there are five faucets to fourteen cook 
houses. Would suggest that five pieces of rubber hose, twenty- 
five feet long, with nozzles, be supplied, in order that all the space 
between and cook houses can be properly flushed out with plenty 
of water. 

Would also suggest, in addition, that regimental hospital be sup- 
plied with fly. Men while waiting at sick call or other times for 
treatment often have to stand in the broiling sun or in the rain with- 
out any protection. I believe men should be protected from such 
unnecessary exposure, which can be so easily remedied. 
Very respectfully, 

John P. Lombard, 
Major and Surgeon, Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M> 



Headquarters Massachusetts Natal Brigade, M. V. M. r 
Fall River, Mass , Sept. 23, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Robert A. Blood, Surgeon General, M. V. M. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
medical department of the Naval Brigade, M. V. M., for the tour 
of duty at Fort Rodman, Aug. 17 to 24 inclusive, 1901. 

The weather conditions, with the exception of one day of heavy 
rain, were all that could be desired. The temperature at no time 
was excessive. 

The water supply (from New Bedford city water) was good after 
the first day. A week had intervened between the last battalion 
of the First Regiment Heavy Artillery and our camp, and the water 
had consequently been left standing in the pipes and had become a 
trifle rusty. This was allowed to run away, and afterwards no 
trouble was noticed from this source. 

The three assistant surgeons were detailed as follows : one to 
accompany the U. S. S. " Inca," which took one company each day 
to sea ; one had charge of the hospital and dispensary tents ; and 
the third was detailed to personally oversee the disinfecting of the 
sinks, to accompany the detail for target practice, and also to be 
present at the swimming contests which took place at 11 o'clock 
daily. 

The food supply was excellent and of sufficient quantity, and 
reflects great credit on General Wellington's system of supply. 

Some difficulty was experienced the first two days by the collec- 
tion of surface water about the water faucets and in rear of the 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 59 

cook houses. This was overcome by the digging of blind drains 
and the erection of a platform near the water faucets, and the dig- 
ging of small trenches in the rear of the cook houses. The sinks 
so far as possible were disinfected by the individual method of 
lime and dry earth ; in addition, they were thoroughly covered 
under the supervision of a surgeon two or three times daily. A 
general inspection of the sinks and cook houses was made daily by 
the captain and myself. 

There were a number of cases of cramps, accompanied with 
diarrhoea, but none which did not yield to treatment rapidly. 
These cases were attributed by the men to the water, but after 
careful inquiry I am led to believe that the true cause was in the 
changed conditions of living, clothing, practically out-door life, 
sudden cooling after free perspiration, etc. ; since a number of the 
men used the water freely and were in no wise affected, while 
others who depended on bottled spring water were ill. 

I should recommend that another year we be supplied with two 
hospital tents. I was obliged to ask our equipment officer to erect 
a tent with floor for use as hospital, which was promptly done. 

The assistant surgeons, Drs. Eldridge, Sughrue and Blair, were 
enthusiastic and very efficient, and to them I am indebted for 
their hearty co-operation. I take this opportunity to thank the 
officers of the various companies for their support. For your 
courtesy and promptness, sir, in honoring requisitions, I wish to 
extend my thanks. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

S. Virgil Merritt, 
Lieutenant Commander and Surgeon, Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 



Battery A, Light Artillery, Second Brigade, M. V. M., 
Boston, Aug. 5, 1901. 

To the Surgeon General of Massachusetts. 

Sir : — I have the honor to make the following medical report of 
the tour of duty recently performed by Battery A, Light Artillery, 
M. V. M. 

On July 13 the command disembarked from the railroad at 
Sandwich, Mass., and went into camp at Sagamore beach, four 
miles distant, remaining there the entire week, and returning to 
Boston by rail on July 20. 

The weather was excellent, as is shown in the following table : — 



60 



ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 




The health of the command was perfect, no one being excused 
from duty at any time for illness, and both men and horses were 
returned to Boston in improved physical condition. 

The food was simple, but abundant and of the best quality, and 
the cooking excellent at all times. 

All the drinking water was taken from boiling springs, one- 
fourth mile distant from camp and one-eighth mile from any habi- 
tation. These springs were inspected daily, and the water was 
tested on July 15, and found to contain the smallest possible traces 
of organic matters and nitrous acid. Water for washing purposes 
and for watering horses was obtained from a well on the beach 
near the camp. A stagnant pool of water behind the camp was 
flooded with petroleum, as a precaution against mosquitoes, which, 
however, were at no time troublesome. 

The policing of the camp was careful and thorough, and the 
sanitary arrangements wholly satisfactory. A trench with two 
set poles was used as a sink, and especial attention was paid to 
a thorough covering of the dejecta with lime and fresh dirt three 
times daily. The arrangement of the camp was such as to give 
ample air space between the tents, and on July 17 all tents were 
struck and repitched on fresh ground. 

The working hours of the camp were so arranged as to give the 
men eight hours rest at night and an hour in the morning for a bath 
in the ocean between reveille (5 a.m.) and breakfast call. The 
drills occupied two hours of each morning and afternoon, and, 
while most practical and hard, were so varied as to be at no time 
exhausting to men or horses. 

The clothing of the men was the same as on the tour of duty in 
1900; viz., underclothes, khaki suit and leggins, blue shirt, over- 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 61 

coat, blanket, rubber blanket, laced boots, extra shirts and boots ; 
no beds or sleeping bags. 

The medical force consisted of one officer and one acting hospital 
steward. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

John W. Cummin, 
First Lieutenant and Assistant Surgeon. 



Jamaica Plain, Aug. 5, 1901. 
Brig. Gen. R. A. Blood, Surgeon General, M. V. M. 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit the following report of my 
annual tour of duty with the Second Brigade, M. V. M. 

Although the veterinarian of the battalion of cavalry, yet the 
duties devolving upon me are practically those of a brigade officer, 
as I not only have to examine and look after the horses of the 
command with which I am directly connected, but all the horses in 
other commands for which the State makes an allowance. On 
account of this, my duties covered a longer period of time than 
usual, as on July 111 visited the camp of the Eighth Regiment at 
Boxford, and inspected the horses there ; and on July 12 and 13 1 
examined the horses which Light Battery A took on its annual tour 
of duty. July 19 the First Battalion of Cavalry started for Fram- 
ingham, camping for the night at Needham, and continuing the 
march to Framingham July 20, arriving there about noon. The 
horses were inspected by seeing how the command was mounted 
as it rode along ; two men were ordered to drop out and secure 
better horses, as the animals they rode were lame, and one man 
was sent back for another horse, because the animal he rode was a 
kicker, and a source of danger to other horses and men. July 21 
the horses ridden by the brigade staff, the infantry regiments and 
the Ambulance and Signal Corps were inspected. 

A number of horses in the cavalry battalion were coughing, due 
to the prevailing epizootic. The temperatures of several were 
taken, and found to be normal, and the animals showed no loss of 
appetite, therefore they were kept at work, with no bad results so 
far as I know. This form of influenza seemed to be very mild, 
and very few of the horses had any symptoms except a peculiar 
dry, spasmodic cough.. A few ran at the nose a little. There was 
one horse which ran a good deal from the nose, ridden by a man 
in Troop A, and, as he came from a stable where there is a history 
of glanders, I kept the horse isolated in the hospital stable during 



62 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEFOKT. [Jan. 

the week. Since he was sent home I have. had the inspector of 
animals for the city of Everett examine the horse, and he says that 
all symptoms of glanders have disappeared. I therefore am of the 
opinion that this animal was suffering from a more severe form of 
the prevailing influenza than the others. 

There were a number of casualties this year ; it seems to me that 
there were more than usual, and some of them quite severe. July 

19 a mare ridden by Lieutenant Coburn of Troop D backed against 
an iron post of the Boston Elevated Railroad, in Roxbury, bruis- 
ing the rump so that a fluctuating swelling developed, which I had 
to open July 22, allowing a quantity of serum and a blood clot to 
escape. This mare had to be led home. On the morning of July 

20 a small brown mare, ridden by Corporal Akins of Troop D, was 
severely kicked at the picket line ; one kick on the outside of the 
off forearm required two stitches ; she was ridden from Needham 
to Framingham, but was not used during the week, and was led 
home. Both these horses were owned by Trooper R. J. Ferris of 
Troop D. July 20 a mare ridden by Quartermaster Sergeant Cald- 
well of Troop A was ridden in advance of the battalion to Framing- 
ham, and upon arriving there was found to be overcome with heat 
and exhaustion. She was put in the hospital for a couple of days, 
but before I saw her was given some sweet spirits of nitre which 
was not diluted with water ; the result was that her mouth was so 
blistered that she could hardly eat or drink for a week, and her 
owner left her to be turned out at pasture in Wellesley on the way 
home. July 23 a horse ridden by Captain Perrins of Troop D was 
reported as having a sore back from the saddle ; he was not ridden 
again, and was led home July 26. July 24 a black gelding ridden 
by Quartermaster Sergeant Harrison of the First Battalion of 
Cavalry staff, while out practising picket duty in the evening, 
endeavored to jump a picket fence, and, as it was rather an un- 
gainly animal, succeeded in becoming impaled on a picket, from 
which it received a bad punctured wound in the axillary region ; 
the picket penetrated the pectoral muscles, struck the sternum and 
glanced upward along the ribs on the left side of the chest. This 
horse was left with Dr. W. P. Mayo, at the South Framingham 
Veterinary Hospital. Dr. Mayo reports to me that the horse is 
doing nicely, and will be fit to return home in two or three days 
from date. July 25 a horse ridden by Trooper Bickford of Troop 
A was severely kicked on the inside of the off forearm, making a 
cut that bled very profusely, and necessitating taking two stitches 
in the wound. This horse is owned by the Draper & Hall Com- 
pany of Boston, and, as it had a number of horses to send home 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Eo. 7. 63 

on the cars July 27, it let Trooper Bickford have another horse to 
ride, and sent the injured horse home by train. Thursday, July 
25, Trooper Sawin of Troop A was given permission to ride the 
horse suspected of having glanders, as it was improving, and evi- 
dently only had influenza, in order to have it fit to ride home 
Friday ; but in some way it was lamed, so that it had to be led 
home. 

Aside from the casualties mentioned, the horses returned home 
in excellent condition. The tour of duty was easier than last year, 
and no cantle rolls were carried, the baggage all going in wagons, 
consequently there were no serious sore backs, in comparison with 
some years. The horses were also as a whole a rather superior lot 
of animals. Another reason for fewer sore backs, I think, is also 
due to the benefit the men have received from the instructions in 
riding they have received ; they sat the horses better, and there 
was less of the lolling back in the saddles that was formerly to be 
observed when the men became a little tired. The horses were sat 
in a way which brought an even bearing of the side bars of the 
saddle on the horses' backs throughout their entire length ; there 
were, therefore, very few instances where undue weight was brought 
to bear at any one point, and consequently very little trouble from 
galls. 

Connecting the water pipes on the camp ground with the water 
mains of the town of Framingham has resulted in a great improve- 
ment in the quality of the water, both for the use of horses and 
men. The horses seem to like the present supply much better 
than the swamp water furnished in preceding years. 

The condition of the stables has been criticised somewhat this 
year ; they appear to be healthy and very free from odor, but 
they have been in use for a number of years, and the surface of 
the ground is becoming very uneven from constant scraping, and 
also presents a very dirty appearance from the urine and excrement 
it has absorbed. It has been suggested that the aisles between the 
rows of stalls should be covered with a concrete or cement floor, 
and fresh gravel put in the stalls. As the stables are used so little, 
only two weeks in the year, I am not certain that the expense of 
cement floors is a necessity ; but I would suggest that the earth in 
the stalls and aisles be removed for a depth of six or eight inches, 
and that it be replaced with fresh, clean, screened gravel. The 
material in the stables ought to be almost worth taking away on 
account of its manurial value, as it must be quite rich in the ele- 
ments of fertility. The artillery stable on the left of the line ought 
to be raised and filled in, possibly both stables for artillery horses, 



64 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

but especially the left, as it is at preseDt in such a hollow that the 
water runs into it and stands on the floor when there is a severe 
shower. 

Owing to the number of casualties as a result of kicks this year, 
it has been suggested that in the future it shall be mentioned in the 
battalion orders for camp that men shall as far as practicable hire 
geldings, as most of the animals that kick are mares during the 
period of oestrus. While the injuries this year from kicks were 
confined chiefly to horses, yet there have been cases where men 
have been severely injured in this way ; and a kicking horse is no 
less a source of danger to riders than to other horses. There is no 
doubt that geldings are less liable to kick than mares, especially 
among a lot of horses that are not used to being ridden in company, 
and that their use as far as possible would in the majority of 
mounts be much safer. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Austin Peters, 
First Lieutenant and Veterinary Surgeon, 
First Battalion Cavalry, M. V. M. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



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1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 69 



I I I I I I ! I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



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70 



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1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



71 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7, 



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78 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



EEPOET OF THE COMMISSARY GENERAL. 



Commissary General's Office, 

Worcester, Mass., Dec. 10, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Samuel Dalton, Adjutant General, Stale House, Boston, 

Mass. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
operations of the subsistence department of the Massachusetts 
Volunteer Militia for the current year. 

Pursuant to General Orders, No. 8, articles XIII-XVIII, current 
series, commissary supplies were purchased, at the time stated in 
said orders, and this department was ready to ration the companies 
of the several commands comprising the militia of the Common- 
wealth. Early in the year a new form of ration return, based upon 
the experience of 1900, was formulated. The adoption of these 
returns made the work of the regimental commissary officers very 
much easier. 

I was present during the tour of duty of the following : — 

First Brigade, M. V. M., at South Framingham, June 21 to 28 
inclusive. 

Second Brigade, M. V. M., at South Framingham, July 20 to 
26 inclusive. 

Second and Third Battalions, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, 
at Fort Rodman, New Bedford, July 27 to August 10 inclusive. 

Naval Brigade, at Fort Rodman, New Bedford, August 17 to 
24 inclusive. 

The following commands performed their annual tour of duty as 
below : — 

Eighth Regiment Infantry, at Boxford, July 6 to 13 inclusive. 

First Corps Cadets, at Hingham, July 13 to 20 inclusive. 

Second Corps Cadets, at Boxford, August 17 to 24 inclusive. 

Light Battery A, Second Brigade, at Cape Cod, by route marches 
and camps, July 13 to 20 inclusive. 

The commanding officers of the last-named four organizations 
purchased, by authority from this department, all supplies for 
their respective commands, the rations being issued by their com- 
missary officers, and all bills for same paid by the Commissary 
General, in accordance with General Orders, No. 8, current series. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



79 



Prior to the opening of the camp a daily "mess bill" for the 
tour of duty was prepared by this department and adopted by each 
command, thus greatly facilitating the distribution of supplies. 
With few innovations, the system inaugurated last year, 1900, 
was followed. The following table of the cost per daily ration to 
the different organizations shows that the present method of issuing 
supplies means a great saving to every command, as the former 
custom of supplying food by caterers for each company cost from 
$1.25 to $1.75 per man per day. 

Cents. 

36 



First Brigade, .... 

Second Brigade, 

First Regiment Heavy Artillery, 

Naval Brigade, 

Eighth Regiment Tnfantry, 

First Corps Cadets, . 

Second Corps Cadets, 

Battery A, Second Brigade, 



38 
42 
34 
47 
40 
46 
60 



I am indebted to Capt. Wilder Holmes, quartermaster First 
Regiment Heavy Artillery, and Capt. W. S. Emory, quartermaster 
First Brigade staff, for valuable services rendered in camp of the 
First and Second Brigades respectively. These two officers were 
on duty under special detail by the Adjutant General. I wish also 
to mention the valuable services rendered by Lieut. Thomas S. 
Prouty, acting commissary of Naval Brigade. His experience of 
last year, together with his zeal and general knowledge, made it 
possible for me to close all the financial accounts of the Naval 
Battalion on the night preceding the close of its tour of duty. 

I take pleasure in acknowledging with thanks the many acts of 
courtesy, as well as the hearty co-operation, of brigade, regimental 
and separate battalion commanders during the year. 

I am indebted to the Adjutant General for his prompt action in 
making every detail asked for, and for other valuable assistance. 

I have the honor to be, General, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 



FEED. W. WELLINGTON, 

Brigadier General, Commissary General, M. V. M. 



80 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



EEPOET OF THE JUDGE ADVOCATE GENEBAL. 



Judge Advocate General's Office, 
Boston, Dec. 14, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Samuel D alt on, Adjutant General, Boston. 

Sir : — I have the honor to make my report for the current year. 

Of the regimental courts held during the year, the proceedings 
in twenty-one cases, against twenty-three defendants, were referred 
to me for review, and my reports in writing in these several cases 
have been made. No general court-martial was held during the 
year. I have given my opinions in writing upon the several mat- 
ters pertaining to the government of the militia that have been 
referred to me for advice. 

During the session of the General Court, while the committee 
on military affairs had under consideration the bill concerning the 
militia, that was reported by the board on revision of the militia 
laws, I examined the bill with care, at the request of the com- 
mittee on military affairs, and made several suggestions and rec- 
ommendations in the matter. One of these recommendations I 
deem of paramount importance, and it seems to me to be proper 
that I repeat this recommendation in this report, as hereunder. 

However appropriate to the conditions existing when the Con- 
stitution was adopted may have been the provisions of article 10 
of section 1 of chapter 2 of the Constitution, requiring that most 
of the officers of the line, from brigadier general to subaltern, 
should be elected by their respective inferiors, I believe it to be 
quite generally the opinion of the members of the militia of to-day, 
as well as of others who have given the subject serious considera- 
tion, that the organic law should be in such shape as to place it 
within the power of the Legislature to prescribe other methods of 
election or appointment ; and perhaps it would not be an over- 
statement to say that it is the prevailing opinion, among those who 
have given much thought to the subject, that the present system 
of election of officers should be changed as soon as possible. 
There can be no question that, from a purely military stand-point, 
the present elective system is most unmilitary, and subversive of 
proper discipline. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 81 

In order to lay the foundation for a thorough and proper revision 
of the militia laws, so as to bring them into conformity with present 
conditions, I recommend that an article of amendment to the Con- 
stitution be submitted to the Legislature, and by the Legislature 
in due time to the people, in terms substantially as follows, to 
wit : — 

Officers of the militia may be appointed or elected in such manner as 
the legislature may from time to time prescribe, any provisions of article 
ten of section one of chapter two of the constitution to the contrary not- 
withstanding. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HENRY S. DEWEY, 

Brigadier General and Judge Advocate General. 



82 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF MILITARY EXAMINERS. 



Office of the Examining Board for 

Officers of the Volunteer Militia, 

Boston, Jan. 1, 1902. 

Brig. Gen. Samuel Dalton, Adjutant General. 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit, in behalf of the Examining 
Board, the following report : — 

During the year 1901 the Board held 34 meetings and examined 
133 officers, passed 128 as competent, rejected 5 as incompetent. 

Of the officers examined, .039 per cent, failed to pass, while 
during the years 1899-1900 12.095 per cent, failed. 

All the necessary records and papers have been completed for 
the year. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. A. BANCROFT, 

Major General, President 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 83 



EEPOET OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OE EIFLE 

PRACTICE. 



Office of the Inspector General of Rifle Practice, 
State House, Boston, Dec. 31, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Samuel Dalton, Adjutant General. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the report of this department 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1901. 

Col. William H. Brigham was promoted Inspector General, and 
the present chief of the department of rifle practice was appointed, 
under General Orders, No. 12, June 8. 

Orders and Circulars. 

The following orders and circulars relating to the department 
have been issued from the office of the Adjutant General during 
the year : — 

General Orders, No. 5, March 9, publishing rules and regulations 
for the government of rifle, carbine and revolver practice and 
competitions. 

Circular, May 1, publishing target assignments at Walnut Hill 
range. 

General Orders, No. 12, June 8, publishing the appointment of 
Col. James G. White, Inspector General of Rifle Practice. 

General Orders, No. 18, September 7, publishing special duty 
details and final regulations for State general rifle and carbine 
competitions. 

General Orders, No. 20, October 9, extending the shooting season 
to November 16. 

General Orders, No. 24, December 31, publishing results of 
State general regimental and corps competitions, and the award of 
prizes. 

Efficiency. 

A very satisfactory result has been attained this year. As com- 
pared with 1900, the number of efficients shows a gain of 9.11 per 
cent., — a gain of 19.77 per cent, over 1899, and only 2.27 per 
cent, less than the highest efficiency ever recorded. 

The following table is a summary of the year's work : — 



84 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

Original qualifications, 2,865 

Requalifications, 1,727 

Efficients not requalifying, 413 

Total, 5,005 

Marksmen of record in service Nov. 16, 1901, . . . 5,005 

Unqualified men in service Nov. 16, 1901, . . . 518 



Aggregate strength subject to range work, . . 5,523 

Of the 518 unqualified men : — 

The Second Brigade returns, 311 

The First Brigade returns, 123 

The Fifth Regiment Infantry is responsible for 125 of the 311 
unqualified men of the Second Brigade. 

Company F of the Second Regiment Infantry has the largest 
number unqualified ("34) , but it is fair to state that this company 
was only organized last May. 

Company D of the Fifth Regiment Infantry stands second on the 
list, with 29 unqualified. 

Companies K of the Fifth and L of the Eighth Regiments 
Infantry have each a. record of 23; and, although Troop D won 
the trophy in the cavalry competition, it returns 20 non-marksmen. 

Honorable Mention. 

The following companies, having the maximum legal enrolment, 
have qualified every officer and man : — 

First Regiment Heavy Artillery : Battery H, Chelsea, Capt. W. 
L. Pratt; Battery M, Fall River, Capt. David Fuller. Second 
Regiment Infantry : Company C, Worcester, Capt. P. L. Rider ; 
Company G, Springfield, Capt. Wm. C. Hayes. Fifth Regiment 
Infantry : Company F, Waltham, Capt. C. E. Hamilton. Sixth 
Regiment Infantry : Company B, Fitchburg, Capt. J. C. Smith ; 
Company E, South Framingham, Capt. H. W. Damon. Eighth 
Regiment Infantry : Company B, Everett, Capt. E. L. Sweetser ; 
Company C, North Cambridge, Capt. C. H. Cutler ; Company I, 
Lynn, Capt. P. F. Packard. 

The following companies, having less than the maximum legal 
enrolment, have qualified every officer and man : — 

First Regiment Heavy Artillery : Battery B, Cambridge, 58 men, 
Capt. W. E. Lombard; Battery E, New Bedford, 62 men, Capt. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



85 



J. L.'Gibbs; Battery G, Boston, 61 men, Capt. A. B. Chick. 
Second Regiment Infantry: Company H, Worcester, 61 men, 
Capt. H. C. Young. Sixth Regiment Infantry : Company A, 
Wakefield, 62 men, Capt. F. E. Gray ; Company D, Fitchburg, 
60 men, Capt. A, J. Whelan ; Company F, Marlborough, 57 men, 
Capt. F. E. Cutter. 

Thirty-two companies report every officer and man a qualified 
marksman. 

Qualification Requirements. 

The scores prescribed for requalification were the same as in 
1900 ; but it was required that requalification should mean requali- 
fying in " the highest class previously attained." 

Figure of Merit. 
Points for each qualification have been allowed on the same 
basis as last year, viz. : — 

5 points for each sharpshooter. 
4 points for each first-class marksman. 
3 points for each second-class marksman. 
2 points for each third-class marksman. 

And one point has been allowed for two scores fired without quali- 
fication or requalification. The rule requiring that requalification 
should mean requalifying in the highest class previously attained 
seems to have worked very satisfactorily, as will be seen by the 
following table : — 





Efficiency 

Percentage, 

1900. 


Efficiency 

Percentage, 

1901. 


Increase. 


First Regiment, . . 


53.85 


60.80 


6.95 


Second Regiment, .... 


55.25 


61.08 


5.83 


Fifth Regiment, 


40.63 


48.93 


8.30 


Sixth Regiment, 


54.85 


62.31 


7.46 


Eighth Regiment, .... 


34.46 


48.51 


14.05 


Ninth Regiment, .... 


44.74 


47.21 


2.47 


First Corps Cadets, .... 


69.37 


72.89 


3.52 


Second Corps Cadets, .... 


47.72 


48.85 


1.13 


Naval Brigade, 


39.63 


57.37 


17.74 


Troop A, 


50.00 


52.43 


2.43 


Troop D, ...... 


36.67 


36.33 


*.34 


Troop F, 


48.10 


52.59 


4.49 



* Decrease. 



86 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

It will be noted that every organization, with the exception of 
Troop D, Cavalry, shows an increased percentage over 1900 : — 

4 organizations made 60 per cent. 

3 organizations over 50 per cent. 

4 organizations over 40 per cent. 

The possible points of all these organizations, including general 
and headquarters staffs, were 27,615. The actual points made 
were 15,215, — an average of 55.09 per cent., — an increase over 
1900 of 7.95 per cent. 

Money and Money Allowances. 
The former allowance of $1.50 for each qualification or requali- 
fication recorded was abandoned this year, and a new scale of com- 
pensation was adopted, calling for : — 

$2.50 for each sharpshooter qualification or requalification. 
2.00 for each first-class qualification or requalification. 
1.50 for each second-class qualification or requalification. 
1.00 for each third-class qualification or requalification. 

One dollar was also allowed for each first-class and 50 cents for 
each second-class revolver qualification or requalification. No 
allowance was made for requalification in a lower class than the 
marksman had previously attained. 

A money allowance was made for headquarters qualification, the 
same as for companies ; but no allowance was made for ammuni- 
tion, as heretofore. There has been some criticism in regard to 
this arrangement for money allowance ; but each organization has 
earned more money than formerly, and the inducement to requalify 
in a higher class in order to secure the larger allowance has ap- 
parently stimulated effort, and has resulted in a much larger list 
of requalifications than before. In former years many of the 
higher-class marksmen, who did not care to give the time, or had 
no ambition to repeat their record of former years, went to the 
range possibly once or twice during the season, and, having shot a 
second-class score, considered their duty to the State had been 
performed by earning $1.50 for their companies. The result has 
been that many very good shots have grown rather indifferent, and 
have not tried to increase the shooting value of their companies. 

Money allowances have been made as follows : — 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



87 



First Heavy Artillery, 

SecoDd Infantry, 

Fifth Infantry, 

Sixth Infantry, 

Eighth Infantry, 

Ninth Infantry, 

Naval Brigade, 

First Corps Cadets, 

Second Corps Cadets, 

First Battalion Cavalry, 

Troop F, Cavalry, . 

First Brigade headquarters, 

Second Brigade headquarters, 

Battery A, First Battalion Light Artillery, 

Battery B, First Battalion Light Artillery, 

Money allowances made in 1900 : — 



First Heavy Artillery, 
Second Infantry, 
Fifth Infantry, . 
.Sixth Infantry, 
Eighth Infantry, 
Ninth Infantry, 
Naval Brigade, 
First Corps Cadets, 
Second Corps Cadets, 
First Battalion Cavalry, 
Troop F, Cavalry, . 



11,174 50 

1,118 00 

890 00 

1,179 00 

782 00 

819 50 

723 50 

396 50 

215 50 

183 50 

106 50 

12 50 

17 00 

16 50 

16 50 



$931 50 
951 00 
660 00 
903 00 
555 00 
795 00 
502 50 
333 00 
210 00 
154 50 
94 50 



r ,651 00 



6,090 00 



Increase in 1901, 



. $1,561 00 



Emergency Ammunition. 

It has been recommended by my predecessors that " 1,000 
rounds of service ball cartridges be issued to the commanding 
officer of each company, foot battery, division and troop, to be 
held in readiness for possible emergency (under seal) until the 
close of the year, and then replaced by a like issue of fresh am- 
munition, the original issue thereupon becoming available for 
target practice." I heartily concur with the above recommenda- 
tion. 

The State General Competitions. 

The State general rifle competition was held at Walnut Hill, 
Woburn, on Thursday, September 26, and the carbine competition 
at the same place, on Thursday, October 3. This is the first time 



88 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 

the rifle and carbine competitions have been held on separate days, 
the result being an absence of crowding and plenty of time for 
completing scores. The cavalry shot at 500 yards for the first 
time in a State competition, and results indicate that they will have 
to give much more attention to long-range shooting. 

The weather conditions were excellent on both days. 

There were 128 more points made by the foot troops than last 
year, and 240 more points than were made in 1899. It is of 
course impossible to compare the scores made by the cavalry with 
those of previous years, on account of shooting under the new 
conditions (200 and 500 yards). The following officers detailed 
at the rifle competition are entitled to special mention : Lieut. Col. 
Walter C. Hagar, A.A.G., First Brigade, statistical officer^ 
Lieut. Col. Elmore E. Locke, A.A.Gr., Second Brigade ; Lieut. Col. 
Otis H. Marion, medical director, First Brigade ; Maj. Herbert A. 
Clark, A.I.G.R.P., Second Brigade ; Maj. Charles D. Wainwright, 
A.I.G.R.P., First Brigade; Capt. Wm. B. Emery, First Brigade 
staff; Capt. Hugh Bancroft, Second Brigade staff; Lieut. John 
W. Hall, paymaster, First Battalion Cavalry; Lieut. Henry W. 
Sprague, signal officer, Second Brigade. 

The Sixth Regiment Infantry won the tri-color, with a score of 
1,268 out of a possible 1,500 points, at 200 and 500 yards. The 
team of the First Regiment Heavy Artillery was second, with a 
score of 1,263 points. 

In the cavalry competition the guidon trophy was won by Troop 
D of Boston, with a score of 742 out of a possible 1,000 points, at 
200 and 500 yards. Troop A was second, with a score of 685 
points. Much praise is due Troop D for its surprisingly good 
work at the 500 yard distance, as the team shot with two substitutes 
who had not practised with them, the two regular members being 
absent on account of illness. 

Special mention is made of the efficient services of the following 
officers detailed for this competition : Maj. Geo. W. Mills, surgeon, 
First Battalion Cavalry; Lieut. John M. Portal, I.R.P., First 
Regiment Heavy Artillery; Lieut. Joseph S. Hart, I.R.P., Sixth 
Regiment Infantry ; Lieut. Wm. A. Hayes, 2d, I.R.P., First Corps 
Cadets ; Lieut. Henry B. Clapp, paymaster, First Battalion Light 
Artillery. 

It will be noted in the tables appended to this report that the 
First Regiment of Heavy Artillery, the Second, Fifth and Sixth 
Regiments of Infantry, the Naval Brigade and the First Corps 
Cadets made over 80 per cent, of the possible score at the two 
ranges. 



1902.]- PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 89* 



Corps Competitions. 

The annual regimental and corps competitions of company teams 
were held as follows : First Regiment Heavy Artillery, at Walnut 
Hill, October 22 ; Second Regiment Infantry, at Holyoke, October 
17; Fifth Regiment Infantry, at Lexington, October 10; Sixth 
Regiment Infantry, at Lexington, October 14; Eighth Regiment 
Infantry, at Indian Hill range, Lynn, October 24 ; Ninth Regiment 
Infantry, at Walnut Hill, November 1 ; First Corps Cadets, at 
Lexington, October 19 ; Second Corps Cadets, at Marblehead, 
September 20 ; Naval Brigade, at Walnut Hill, October 29. 

For the first time company teams consisted of 15 men firing 15 
shots each, as against 10 men firing 10 shots each in previous 
years. It is very clear that the efficiency of a company is better 
demonstrated by the larger team of 15 men. As to whether 10 
shots or 15 shots should be the proper number, opinions differ 
somewhat, and I quote extracts from the reports of various officers, 
as follows : — 

From report of inspector of rifle practice, First Regiment Heavy 
Artillery : " An increase of 60 men in the firing details and 1,500 
rounds in the aggregate of shots fired reduced the regimental 
standing but 3.6 per cent, from the former highest record. The 
first. 10 shots fired by the 10 ranking competitors on each battery 
team aggregated 4,405 points, or 73.4 per cent., a substantial gain 
in marksmanship over former years. The previous highest per- 
centage was 71 per cent." 

Extract from report of inspector of rifle practice, Second Regi- 
ment Infantry : " Although the average scores per man were less 
than last year, when we take into consideration the fact that the 
number of men shooting was increased one-third and the number 
of shots fired was one-third more than last year, making the test 
more severe, I consider the results quite satisfactory. I am sure 
the value of competition under this year's arrangement is much 
greater than under the arrangements of former years." The shoot- 
ing conditions under which this match was shot were unfavorable, 
light and wind extremely variable. 

Extracts from report of inspector of rifle practice, Fifth Regi- 
ment Infantry : " It would appear, on the whole, that a great deal 
of improvement was shown on each successive string of 5 shots. 
. . . The strong shooting companies remained fairly constant 
throughout, while the weak teams profited most by the extra string. 
It shows conclusively that the first 5 shots is almost uniformly the 
weakest string, with a much less difference between the second and 



90 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

third strings. From the foregoing, I am inclined to the belief that 
the increase has been a detriment to none, and an assistance to 
many of the teams." 

Extracts from report of ordnance officer, Naval Brigade : " Five 
out of the eight companies increased their average in marksman- 
ship, and the brigade showed a decided gain in marksmanship over 
last year. For a test of company merit, 15 men are of more value 
than 10. . . . With proper range for practice of the Boston com- 
panies, the test of 15-men teams is of greatest merit. ... I pre- 
fer a competition for 15 men, 10 shots each." 

Col. Wm. A. Pew, Jr., Eighth Regiment Infantry, says : " . . . 
I fail to see any advantage in each man being required to fire 15 
shots, unless a test of endurance is desired. A team of 15 men 
firing 15 rounds and one sighting shot, requires, and is allowed, 
just four hours of actual firing time ; and this seems to me need- 
lessly tedious to those waiting, and fatiguing to the shooter under 
our present facilities. On the other hand, I favor the larger team, 
as it more truly brings out the strength, or rather the weakness, of 
the company." 

Col. Charles K. Darling, Sixth Regiment Infantry, says : u . . . 
I am inclined to the opinion that the 15-man team is representative 
of each company better than is the 10-man team ; and ... I 
should say 15 men firing only 10 shots. I fail to see wherein the 
time and cost of the additional 5 shots pay for the small gain de- 
rived." 

Extract from report of inspector of rifle practice, First Corps 
Cadets: " . . . If . . . it is considered wise to have the company 
teams hereafter consist of 15 men, as much can be learned of the 
shooting ability of the teams from 10-shot scores as from 15-shot 
scores. Such inspection of the scores of our own teams and of 
such other teams as I have been able to make would not lead me 
to suppose that with good shots, such as a team should be com- 
posed of, there is any general rule that the last 5 shots of a string 
of 15 are any better or worse than the first 5 or second 5." 

In view of these different reports, the following table of con- 
solidated results is interesting, as showing that invariably the last 
group of 5 shots is better than the first, and in only two cases is it 
less than the second group : — 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



91 





Total 
Score. 


One-third 

of Total 

Score. 


First 
5 Shots. 


Second 
5 Shots. 


Third 
5 Shots. 


First Regiment, . 
Second Regiment, 
Fifth Regiment, . 
Sixth Regiment, . 
Eighth Regiment, 
Ninth Regiment, . 
First Corps Cadets, 
Second Corps Cadets, 
Naval Brigade, 




9,103 
9,887 
8,441 
9,573 
7,607 
6,075 
3,310 
3,001 
5,823 


3,0344 

3,295-| 

2,813-f 

3,191 

2,535-f 

2,025 

1,103-| 

1,000-$ 

1,941 


2,899 

3,194 
2,692 
3,107 
2,490 
1,950 
1,059 
976 
1,858 


3,077 
3,332 
2,867 
3,217 
2,521 
2,094 
1,116 
988 
1,986 


3,127 
3,361 
2,882 
3,249 
2,596 
2,031 
1,135 
1,037 
1,979 


Totals, . 


• 


62,820 


20,940 


20,225 


21,198 


21,397 



Interstate Competition. 

No appropriation has been made for sending a representative 
team to Sea Girt, N. J., as recommended by my predecessors, 
Colonel Frye and Colonel Brigham ; no money could be spared 
from that appropriated to this department ; therefore, this State 
was not represented in the interstate competitions, held August 30 
to September 7, inclusive, although rifle teams from the First 
Corps Cadets, Battery B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, and a 
revolver team from Light Battery A were given permission to go 
to Sea Girt, at their own expense, to compete for prizes offered. 
The chief of this department was also on the range, September 4 
and 5, for the purpose of learning the methods of conducting these 
matches, and forming an opinion, from actual observation, as to 
whether the probable benefit to the Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia to be derived from these competitions would justify the 
necessary expense of sending a team of expert marksmen to repre- 
sent the State. The conclusions arrived at are these : — 

1 . I agree with my predecessors in this office that an increased 
interest in shooting would undoubtedly be stimulated by the neces- 
sary training and selection of a team. 

2. That, judging by the scores made by the teams from the dif- 
ferent sections (New York, New Jersey, Maine, Maryland, Ohio, 
Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia), I am 
satisfied that Massachusetts would give a good account of herself. 

3. That, unless the State will furnish the team with modern, 
high-power rifles, it will be impossible to compete successfully with 
teams equipped with them. 

4. That any team selected to represent the Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Militia must be under strict military discipline. 

5. That an appropriation of not less than $2,000 must be made 
for the expense of such an undertaking. 



92 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



Decorations and Trophies. 

The usual military engravings with inscription plates have been 
issued to the winning teams in the corps competitions, also medals 
and cups to individual prize winners. 

The new badges issued for the first time in 1900 seemed to find 
favor. Over 7,200 decorations of all kinds were issued this year. 

Acting under General Orders, No. 24, paragraph IV, current 
series, the " Tri-Color " and the " Guidon Trophy " will be turned 
over by the officers now holding them to the commanders of the 
Sixth Regiment Infantry and Troop D, First Battalion Cavalry r 
respectively. 

Range Facilities. 

Several new ranges have been constructed during the year. 
Lawrence, which for some years has neglected to take any action 
toward fitting up the ground leased by that city, has now a very 
excellent range nearly completed. Taunton, Chelmsford, Med- 
ford and Gloucester have also constructed new ranges. The city 
of Boston has recently appropriated $25,000 for the purchase of 
suitable ground for a rifle range. A site has been selected, located 
partly in the town of Wilmington and partly in the city of Woburn. 
It is hoped that this range will be completed before May 1, 1902. 

The Walnut Hill range was closed to military shooting from 
September 24 to October 21, at the request of the board of alder- 
men of the city of Woburn, on account of complaints which had 
come from citizens of Woburn, who asserted that stray bullets had 
crossed their property. The officers of the Massachusetts Rifle 
Association having caused certain safeguards to be erected on the 
range, satisfactory to a committee of the Woburn board of alder- 
men, the range was reopened to military shooting from October 21 - r 
but it seems probable that the time is not far distant when military 
shooting, especially with high-power rifles, will be prohibited on 
that range. The mayor of Boston, having been apprised of the 
situation, immediately recommended to the board of aldermen that 
an appropriation should be made for the purpose of buying land 
suitable for a range for the militia, stationed within the city limits. 
This appropriation was passed by both branches of the city gov- 
ernment, and was signed by the mayor. 

The range owned by the city of Lowell, in the town of Dracut, 
was closed July 6, 1901. Mr. Herman G. Guenther of Dracut, 
while driving toward Lowell on a road some distance from the 
range, was struck by a bullet said to have been fired from the 
range. The injury resulted fatally. The city of Lowell has since 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 93 

made certain changes and additions to the range, designed to 
prevent such accidents from being attributable to any negligence 
on the part of the city. 

Owing to the loss of range facilities to so large a proportion of 
the shooting force (over one-third), it seemed wise to extend the 
season for qualification from October 31 (the date named in Gen- 
eral Orders, No. 5) to November 16. 

Revolver Practice. 

A great improvement is shown in revolver practice this year. 
Out of 402 officers and men armed with the service revolver, 328 
have qualified, — 73 more than in 1900. This is certainly en- 
couraging ; but, taking into consideration the fact that for the first 
time both money and points were allowed for revolver qualifica- 
tions, it would seem that every officer should have made an effort 
to add to the efficiency of his company. In this connection it may 
be well to state that 57 officers (nearly 12 per cent, of the entire 
number) failed to visit the ranges at all during the season, — at 
least, there is no record to the contrary. 

Appropriations . 
By the exercise of strict economy, this department has barely 
been able to keep within the appropriation of $18,000 allowed. 
This sum would be sufficient were it not for the fact that the 
amount for pay and transportation at regimental and corps com- 
petitions has been charged against the appropriation for rifle 
practice. If this custom is to continue, the sum of $20,000 will be 
required for the work of this department for the year 1902. 

Recommendations . 

1. That land be acquired by the Commonwealth, having area 
enough for extreme range and skirmish firing, and suitable for an 
encampment of the entire Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

2. That regimental inspectors of rifle practice be given the rank 
of captain. 

3. That more attention be given to teaching recruits the princi- 
ples of sighting. In this way much time can be saved and waste 
of ammunition be prevented. 

4. That the sum of $2,000 be appropriated, to cover the expense 
of the organization, training, pay and transportation of a team of 
expert marksmen who shall participate in the interstate competi- 
tions at Sea Girt, N. J., in 1902. 

5. That not exceeding 75 high-power rifles, with a sufficient 



94 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 

quantity of ammunition, be furnished this department for experi- 
mental use and the practice of a State team ; the selection of these 
rifles to be in the discretion of this department. 

6. That a case of new carbines be allowed to each troop of 
cavalry, for qualification and team shooting only. 

7. That the appropriation for the use of this department for 1902 
be $20,000. 

8. I concur in the recommendation of my immediate predecessor, 
that the Inspector General of Rifle Practice be given authority to 
attend, with pay and transportation, regimental competitions, and 
visit companies at their home stations at his discretion. 

The radical changes from the former qualification requirements 
and money allowances and in the number of men and shots in reg- 
imental and corps competitions were inaugurated by my immediate 
predecessor. It seemed best not to alter his plans, but to await a 
trial of them, with a view to determining the advantage or disad- 
vantage of the system. It gives me pleasure to record that the 
results of the work as carried out on these lines have been very 
gratifying. 

The appendix to this report contains the records and statistics 
of the work of the department for the year. 

The painstaking and efficient work of Sergt. George R. Russell, 
N.C.S., First Regiment Heavy Artillery, in making up the rec- 
ords and statistics of the year, deserves especial mention. He is 
to be highly commended. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAS. G. WHITE, 

Colonel and Inspector General of Rifle Practice. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



95 



KECORD OP MARKSMEN, M. V. M., 1901. 



CLASSIFICATIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS. 

Distinguished Marksman Class (D. M.). 

Distinguished marksmen are sharpshooters of record (1) who have been 
authorized to represent the State in rifle competitions, or (2) who 
may be mentioned in orders as the " first fifteen " of foot troops or 
the "first two" of mounted troops in a State general competition, 
or (3) who have won an individual trophy in a State match. 
Sharpshooters Class (S.S.). Marksmen who have made the following scores : — 
2 scores of 22 out of a possible 25, at 200 yards. 
2 " of 23 " " 25, at 500 " 

2 " of 21 " " 25, at 600 " 

First Class Marksman Class (1st Class). Marksmen who have made the fol- 
lowing scores : — 

2 scores of 21 out of a possible 25, at 200 yards. 
2 " of 21 " " 25, at 500 " 

Second Class Marksman Class (2d Class). Marksmen who have made the fol- 
lowing scores : — 

2 scores of 18 out of a possible 25, at 200 yards. 
Third Class Marksman Class (3d Class). Marksmen who have made the fol- 
lowing scores : — 

2 scores of 15 out of a possible 25, at 200 yards. 
Efficients failing to requalify in the class to which they belong are given credit for 
scores actually made. 

Names appearing without records of range work are those of efficients who failed 
to shoot for record during the target season of 1901. 

COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF AND STAFF. 



Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Lieut. Colonel, . 
Colonel, 

Brig. General, . 
Lieut. Colonel, . 
Major, 

Lieut. Colonel, . 
Major, 

Lieut. Colonel, . 
Brig. General, . 
<< << 

Major, 

Brig General, . 

Lieut. Colonel, . 
<< <( 

Major, 


Gihon, Edward J., . 
White, James G., 
Blood, Robert A, . 
Benyon, George H., 
Colt, James D., 
Denny, Arthur B., . 
Lancaster, James E., 
Williams, Henry L., 
Brigham, William H., 
Dewey, Henry S., . 
Hawkins, Paul R., . 
Wellington, Fred. W., . 
Soutter, James T., . 
Peabody, J. C. R., . 
Proctor, Charles S., . 


6th Mass., 

2d Mass , 
2d Mass., 
8th Mass., 


D. M., 

S. S., 
2d Class, 
D.M., 
S. S., 

s. s., 

o. o«, 

s. s., 

1st Class, 
1st do. 
1st do. 
1st do. 
2d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 


50, 49, 48 

44, 46, 42 

19, 20 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 2 

Sharpshooters, .... 5 

First class marksmen, . . 4 

Second class marksmen, . . 2 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



— 19 



ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 



FIRST BRIGADE, FIELD AND STAFF. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Kegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Captain, 


Emery, William B., 




2d Class, | 


18,21 


(i 


Hall, Bordman, 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 


Sergeant, . 


Sanborn, Walter L., 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 


Major, 


Spring, Arthur L., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Captain, 


Webber, W. 0., 


~ 


2d do. 


20, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Green, H. H., . 


- ' 


3d do. 


15,20 


K 


Murchie, Guy, . 


- 


3d do. 


20,17 


Major, 


Wainwright, C. D., . 


- 


3d do. 


18, 16 


Sergeant, . 


Varney, Edward F., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


Lieut. Colonel, . 


Hagar, Walter C, . 


- 


S. S., 


- 


«< << 


Marion, Otis H., 


Staff,6thMass., 


S. S., 


- 


Brig. General, . 


Mathews, Thomas R., 


- 


1st Class, 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Burroughs, George, . 


- 


2d do. 


- 


Captain, 


Kenny, Charles, 


- 


2d do. 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Lawrence, Richard, . 


- 


2d do. 


- 


<< 


Woods, Walter H., . 


— 


1st do. 


■■ 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen, 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



18 



SECOND BRIGADE, FIELD AND STAFF. 



Hosp. Steward, . 
Major, 

Q. M. Sergeant, . 
Prov. Sergeant, . 
Color Bearer, 
Sergeant, . 
Captain, 



Brig. General, 
Lieut. Colonel, 

Captain, 
Sergeant Major, 
Sergeant, . 



Wyman, Arthur L., 
Clark, Herbert A., . 
Ballard, Harry P., . 
Hayden, Charles, . . 
Cobb, Morton E , . 
Smith, Ralph, . 
Soule, E.B., . 
Story, Oliver H., 
Warren, Albert C, . 
Wardwell, Walter C, 
Whitney, Jophanas H., 
Locke, Elmer E., 
Devine, William H., 
Bancroft, Hugh, 
Muller, Ed. A., 
Youngman, Wm. S., 



5th Mass. 



5th Mass., 

9th Mass., 
5th Mass., 

Penn. Cav., 



S.S 




1st Class, 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


1st 


do. 


S. S 




2d Class, 


S S 




2d Class, 


3d 


do. 



45, 48, 44 
42,45, - 
18,20 
18,20 
18, 19 
19,19 
18,21 
16, 15 
16, 17 
16, 18 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen, 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



4 

2 
— 18 



HEADQUARTERS, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Colonel, 

Major, 
Lieutenant, 



Sergeant Major, . 

Q. M. Sergeant, . 
P. M. Sergeant, . 



Frye, James A., 

Nutter, Charles P., . 
Foster, Willard M., . 
Paine, John B., 

Huddleson, William D., 

Smith, Samuel G., . 
Russell, George R., . 



1st Mass., 

Field. 
1st Mass., C, 

1st Mass., 

Staff. 
1st Mass . , 

N. C. S. 
5th Mass , G, 
1st Mass., K, 




48, 47, 44 

50, 50, 47 
47, 48, 43 
46, 47, 44 

50, 50, 45 

50, 50, 47 
50, 50, 47 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7 



97 



HEADQUARTERS, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY— Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Color Sergeant, . 


Conn, Horace N., 


_ 


D. M., 


48, 50, 46 


.« i< 


Tornrose, Axel T., . 


1st Mass., K, 


D.M., 


49, 50, 46 


Orderly, 


Schulze, Arthur R., . 


- 


D. M., 


50, 48, 46 


Lieutenant, 


Portal, John M., 


- 


S. S., 


46, 48, 46 


(< 


Totten, James E., . 


1st Mass., F, 


s. s., 


46, 48, 42 


Batt. Sergt. Maj , 


Oakes, Walter E., . 


1st Mass., C, 


s. s., 


44, 47, 46 


(« tt u 


Potter, George E., . 


lst'Mass., M, 


s. s., 


44, 48, 44 


Lieut. Colonel, . 


Woodman, Charles B., . 


1st Mass., 
Field. 


1st Class, 


42,47, - 


Captain, 


Wolcott, Roger, 


1st Mass., A, 


1st do. 


43,45, - 


Batt. Sergt. Maj., 


Russell, George EL, . 


1st Mass., A, 


1st do. 


42,46, - 


Major, 


Dearing, Howard S., 


1st Mass., 
Staff. 


2d do. 


21,22 


Captain, 


Holmes, C. Wilder, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Parker, Horace B., . 


1st Mass ., 
Staff. 


2d do. 


18, 19 


M 


Rolph, William A., . 


1st Mass., 
Staff. 


2d do. 


20,20 


Lieutenant, 


Curtin, John A., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


a 


Cushing, J. S , . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


n 


Stedman, J. C, 


_ 


2d do. 


20,21 


{( 


Stevens, Frank B., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


Drum Major, 


Clark, James F., 


1st Mass . , 

N. C. S. 


2d do. 


18,21 


Hosp. Steward, . 


Cole, J. M., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Chief Bugler, 


Hooper, William H., Jr., 


1st Mass., C, 


2d do. 


18,18 


Major, 


Dyar, Perlie A., 


1st Mass . , 
Field. 


S. S., 


— 


«< 


Quinby, George F., . 


1st Mass., 
Field. 


S. S., 





Distinguished marksmen, . . 10 
Sharpshooters, .... 6 
First class marksmen, . . 3 



Second class marksmen, . . 11 
Total, —30 



BATTERY A, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Corporal, . 

Lieutenant, 
1st Sergeant,. 
Q. M. Sergeant, 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Corporal, 



Sergeant, 
<< 

Private, 

a 

Corporal, 

Private, 
<« 

Sergeant, 
Private, 



Cowling, Edward J., 
Bouve", Clement L., . 
Dickerman, Olin D., 
Dunbar, George M., 
Field, George "P., 
Fullerton, E. D wight, 
Smyth, James H., . 
Cutter, Charles W., . 
Johnquest, Henry A., 
Keene, Charles H., . 
Long, Michael J., . 
Bailey, William J. A , 
Brown, Archibald, . 
Dermody, Francis J., 
Dodge, Albert J., 
Foisie, Omer, . 
Kane, Harry J., 
McDonald, Kenneth, 
MacDowell, Robert H. 
Murphy, Stephen A., 
Neilson, William, . 
Nelson, Ernest G., . 



1st Mass., C, 

1st Mass., A, 
1st Mass., A, 
1st Mass., A, 
1st Mass., A, 
1st Mass., A, 
1st Mass., A, 

1st Mass., A, 
1st Mass., A, 



1st Mass., A, 
IstN. H., I, 



D. M., 


S. S 




S. S 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s.s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



46, 47, 45 

44, 48, 43 

45, 46, 43 

44, 47, 46 

45, 46, 42 
50, 47, 44 
50, 50, 46 
46,47, - 
42,42, - 
44, 42, - 
42,42, - 

21,23 
18, 18 
20,19 

18, 19 
18,18 
21,21 
22,21 
19,21 

19, 19 
18,18 
18, 18 



98 



ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



BATTERY A, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY — Concluded. 







Sendee in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Eegt. and Co. 








Private, 


Oliver, Frank S., . 




2d Class. 


20,22 


<t 


Penhallow, D. Pierce, 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


(< 


Rogers, Stanley S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


Musician, . 


Schell, William J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Scigliano, Edward A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


i« 


Tashjian, Kriker T., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Weld, John G., 




2d 


do. 


20,20 


Private, 


Boardman, William P., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


a 


Bradley, Charles H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


a 


Burkhart, George L., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


(< 


Cheney, Sylvester 0., 


2d Mass., 


3d 


do. 


16, 19 


Corporal, . 


Cobb, Marston I., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


Private, 


Cotlam, William D., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Dickie, Alexander N., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<( 


Donohoe, John J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Faudell, Fred P., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Farrenkopf, Joseph C, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


it 


Jennings, John, 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


it 


Hall, Walter H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


it 


Helfrich, Alfred C, . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


17, 18 


«( 


Hogan, John, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


<( 


Lavin, Charles H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


(i 


Mitchell, William S., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(< 


McCoy, J. Arthur, . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«( 


Murphy, Francis A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,18 


<« 


Murray, Francis P., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,15 


<( 


Pentleton, George, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


(( 


Peters, James G., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


t< 


Robertson, Daniel F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Ryall, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<< 


Shea, Dennis F., 


- 


3d 


do. - 


16, 18 


u 


Spanierman, Harry, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,21 


n 


Sutherland, John, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,19 


u 


Weeks, Fred N., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


tt 


Wenzel, Chester A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


u 


West, John W., 


— 


3d 


do. 


15,17 



Distinguished marksman, . 1 

Sharpshooters, .... 6 

First class marksmen, . . 4 

Second class marksmen, . . 18 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



29 
4 



62 



BATTERY B, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 




Lieutenant, 


Underwood, Marshall, 


1st Mass., B, 


D. M , 


50, 50, 46 


1st Sergeant, 


Litchfield, Allen J., . 


1st Mass., B, 


D. M., 


47, 47, 42 


Corporal, . 


Thresher, Edwin A., 


1st Mass., B, 


D. M., 


48, 48, 45 


Private, 


Anderton, Thomas, . 


1st Mass., B, 


D. M , 


50, 50, 50 


a 


Blake, John W., 


- 


D. M., 


50, 48, 45 


a 


Erickson, Edwin C. B., . 


_ 


D. M., 


49, 47, 42 


Captain, 


Lombard, Walter E., 


1st Mass., B, 


S. S., 


48, 49, 47 


Lieutenant, 


Dav, John E., . 


1st Mass., B, 


S. s., 


46, 48, 42 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Cole, George W., 


1st Mass., B, 


s. s., 


48, 50, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Montgomery, William, . 


1st Mass., B, 


s. s., 


47, 49, 42 


<( 


Claupein, William, . 


1st Mass., A, 


s. s., 


47, 48, 44 


Corporal, . 


Shepherd, Frank W., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 44 


<< 


Dearborn, Josiah, . 


1st Mass., B, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


Private, 


Blake, George W., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 47, 46 


tt 


Craigie, James A , . 


1st Mass., B, 


S.S., 


45, 46, 46 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



99 



BATTERY B, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Darling, Silas, . 


1st Mass., B, 


S. s 


•» 


47, 47, 46 


<( 


Gilmore, Manlie G., 


- 


s. s 


•> 


48, 46, 46 


<< 


Lombard, Nathan C., 2d, 


- 


s. s 


•> 


48, 46, 46 


<« 


Morse, Edward R., . 


- 


s. s 


•> 


47, 47, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Lombard, Herbert E., 


1st Mass., B, 


1st Class, 


42, 42, - 


<< 


Shedd, Benjamin B., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Corporal, . 


Higgins, "Walter E., 


1st Mass., B, 


1st 


do. 


42, 45, - 


(< 


Tukey, Charles W., 3d, . 


1st Mass., B, 


1st 


do. 


42,44, - 


Private, 


Anderson, John 0., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


47,46, - 


<« 


Ash, Frank T., 


- 


1st 


do. 


43,43, - 


«( 


Hardy, Freeman G., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 45, - 


o 


Stafford, John C, . 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 44, - 


(« 


Turner, Albert H., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 42, - 


<< 


Wicker, Edison M., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


46,42, - 


Corporal, . 


Eldridge, Joseph H., 


1st Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Brown, Joseph C, . 


1st Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


21 


22 


Bugler, 


Rohrbacher, Fritz A., 


1st Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


19 


20 


Private, 


Burditt, Algernon L., 


1st Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


22 


22 


<< 


Caldwell, William J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Campbell, Robert, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


19 


<( - 


Coles, Herbert B., . 


1st Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


19 


19 


<« 


Fairclough, William A., . 


1st Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


<< 


Gilmore, William E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


22 


t< 


Hicks, Thomas J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22 


22 


<< 


Higgins, Walter G., . 


1st Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


20 


,21 


<< 


Maier, William E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


<( 


Marble, Frank W., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18 


20 


«« 


Marston, Arthur L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


<« 


McDonald, Lawrence P., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


22 


t< 


McGilvray, John H., 


1st Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


(< 


Mitchell, Clarence P., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


<< 


Osthues, Benjamin B., 


1st Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


19 


20 


«( 


Priest, Everett C, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


(i 


Shepherd, Thomas M., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


20 


i< 


Smith, Stanley Q., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


«< 


Stafford, James H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


(< 


Stickney, Walter C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


<< 


Thorpe, Chester E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


20 


<< 


Wilson, Joseph H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


21 


<( 


Bartlett, Edwin A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 


ti 


Doyle, Francis, 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


19 


(< 


Harvey, Frank W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


17 


<( 


Ryan, Arthur L, 


— 


3d 


do. 


17 


17 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 6 
Sharpshooters, .... 13 
First class marksmen, . . 10 



Second class marksmen, 
Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



25 
4 



58 



BATTERY C, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Corporal, . 


Conn, Wallace T., . 


1st Mass., C, 


S. S., 


44, 46, 45 


Private, 


Corbett, John,- . 


1st Mass., B, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 45 


Sergeant, . 


King, G. Morgan, . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


a 


Leach, C. Warren, . 


1st Mass., C, 


s. s., 


49, 46, 47 


<( 


Stevens, Percy, 


1st Mass., C, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 46 


(< 


Stickney, Whitman G., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 47, 43 


Private, 


Will, George G., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


<( 


Worcester, Paul J., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


<« 


Fisher, Herbert G., . 


~ 


1st Class, 


43,46, - 



100 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



BATTERY C, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY — Concluded- 







Service in IT. S. 






Eank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Kegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Lieutenant, 


Hall, Arthur E., 




1st Class, 


44,42, - 


Private, 


Horgan, Frank J., . 


_ 


1st do. 


44, 44, - 


(< 


Palmer, Edwin R., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


<< 


Benedict, George L., 


- 


2d do. 


22,21 


(< 


Catarious, Frank P., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Eastman, Ralph B., 


1st Mass., C, 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Goldstein, Abram, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(( 


Leman, James 0., . 


1st Mass., C, 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Corporal, . 


Martikee, Ernest, 


1st Mass., C, 


2d do. 


19, 19 


t< 


Parker, Fred W., . 


_ 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Private, 


Peasley, Frank H., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Musician, . 


Risen, Andrew R., . 


- 


2d do. 


21,22 


Private, 


Sauer, Fred J., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Simm, Fred E., 


- 


2d do. 


20,21 


n 


Smith, Herbert H., . 


1st Mass., C, 


2d do. 


18,19 


it 


Spencer, Louis V., . 


- 


2d do. 


21,22 


a 


Uhrig, Fred, . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


1st Sergeant, 


Wilkinson, George M., . 


1st Mass., C, 


2d do. 


21,21 


Private, 


Wolff, George A., 


- 


2d do. 


20, 20 


Corporal, . 


Woodworth, John D. R., 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 


Private, 


Alexander, Ernest M., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


" . • . 


Barney, James L., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


" . . 


English, Peter G., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 


" . . 


Greeley, Charles A., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


" . . 


Henderson, Frank L., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


" . . 


Ihlefeldt, George, 


- 


3d do. 


15,15 


" . . 


Kelley, John P., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


'* . . 


Keyes, John F., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


" . . 


Kopp, Robert H., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


" . , 


Leach, Albert E., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 18 


" . . 


McLeod, J. Scott, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


" . . 


Towler, J. Walter, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


Corporal, . 


Willcutt. William B., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


Private, 


Wolff, John P., 


- 


3d do. 


17, 19 


it 


Wolff, John R., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 


Lieutenant, 


McCullough, William J., 


1st Mass., D, 


1st do. 


- 


Captain, 


Nostrom, Charles F., 


1st Mass., C, 


S. S., 


- 


Private, 


Slader, Walter E., . 


— 


2d Class, 


— 


Sharpshooters 


, . . . .9 


Third class marksmen, 


. 15 


First class ma 


rksmen, . . 5 


Unqualified members, 


. 16 


Second class r 


aarksmen, . . 18 


Total 


. —63 


BATTERY D, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Apps, Maurice, 




S. S., 


48, 47, 43 


Private, 


Breen, Albert, . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46. 44 


Sergeant, . 


Estes, Frederick A., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 45 


Corporal, . 


Handy, William B., 


1st Mass., D, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 45 


Private, 


Owen, John, 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 44 


Corporal, . 


Young, Calvin E., . 


1st Mass., D, 


S.S., 


46, 48, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Peyton, William H., 


1st Mass., D, 


S.S., 


45, 46, 45 


Corporal, . 


Donovan, Thomas J., 


1st Mass., K, 


1st Class, 


46,46, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Fogg, David H., 


1st Mass., D, 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Private, 


Hurley, James F., . 


1st Mass., A, 


1st do. 


44, 42, - 


<< 


Owen, Ralph II., 


- 


1st do. 


42, 43, - 


Lieutenant, 


Spenceley, Frederick, 


1st Mass., D, 


1st do. 


43,43, - 


Private, 


Stewart, George F., . 


1st Mass., D, 


1st do. 


42,46, - 


<( 


Swift, Chester H., . 


_ 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


a 


Bourne, Osgood I., . 


1st Mass., C, 


2d do. 


18,19 


<( 


Cameron, Ervin C, Jr , . 


" 


2d do. 


19, 21 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



101 



BATTERY D, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY — Concluded. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Lieutenant, 
Private, 

a 

Sergeant, 

Private, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 

Corporal, 

Captain, 

Private, 

Corporal, 

Private, 



Corporal, 
Private, 



Bugler, 



Cormack, Norman P., 
Cooper, Arthur C, . 
Cushing, Warren L. R , 
Davis, Arthur F., . 
Dingwell, William A., 
Dobbins, Halbnrton, 
Farren, Philip A., . 
French, Arthur H., . 
Frothingham, Joseph H. 
Hanck, Gustav, 
Martens, John, 
McGowan, Joseph J., 
Purchas, William J,, 
Scherer, August L., . 
Smith, Arthur R., . 
Thielscher, Frederick W. 
Albret, Ernest A., . 
Belmont, Sidney A., 
Boardman, Benjamin C. 
Chase, Julian D., 
Crocker, Ralph D , . 
Doane, Ralph A., 
Downes, Frederick H., 
Ellefsen, Charles, 
Fife, John W., . 
Fisk, George F., 
Holl, Walter P., 
Hansen, Christian H., 
Lawler, Ransom I , . 
Lawson, Charles E , 
Maguire, Joseph H., 
Mackie, George P., . 
Mersen, William F. A., 
Macdonald, Henry D., 
Ridgeway, Joseph T , 
Wilder, Sumner C, . 
Donovan, Thomas M., 
Finnerty, Daniel G., Jr., 
Wyatt, Claude E., . 



1st Mass., D, 
2d U. S., G, 



1st Mass., D, 
1st Mass., D, 

1st Mass., D, 



21st U. S., 



1st Mass., D, 
1st Mass., D, 



2d Class, 


19, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


19, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


18, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


18, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


18, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


2d 


do. 




3d 


do. 





,18 
, 18 
, 18 
,20 
, 18 
, 18 
, 19 
, 18 
, 18 
, 18 
,20 
, 19 
,21 
, 18 
,20 
,21 
, 18 
, 17 
,17 
,16 
, 16 
,17 
,17 
, 15 
, 17 
,17 
, 19 
,17 
, 17 
,17 
,17 
,17 
, 16 
, 18 
, 16 
, 18 
,15 



Sharpshooters, .... 7 
First class marksmen, . . 7 
Second class marksmen, . . 19 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



22 
6 
— 61 



BATTERY E, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Private, 


Ellis, Harry C, 


1st Mass., E, 


D. M., 


50, 50, 50 


Captain, 


Gibbs, Joseph L., 


1st Mass., E, 


D. M., 


49, 50, 48 


Sergeant, . 


Soule, Ernest L., 


1st Mass., E, 


D.M., 


48, 50, 47 


a 


Aiken, J., . 


1st Mass., E, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


Atherton, H. G., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 47 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Burt, E. H., . 


1st Mass., E, 


s. s., 


48, 46, 46 


Corporal, . 


Christopher, C. H., Jr., . 


1st Mass., E, 


s. s., 


44, 47, 43 


Lieutenant, 


DeWolf, John C, . 


1st Mass , E, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


Private, 


Desjardins, N., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 46 


(< 


Lowe, EL.,. 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


<< 


Miller, J. J., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


Nelson, W., 


1st Mass., E, 


s. s., 


44, 47, 45 


Private, 


Perry, F 


- 


s. s., 


45, 48, 42 


<( 


Southworth, G., 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


<< 


Southworth, "W., 


~ 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 



102 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan, 



BATTERY B, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


1st Sergeant, 


Spooner, J. C, 


1st Mass., E, 


s. s., 


48, 46, 45 


Private, 


Steele, F. W., . 




- 


s. s., 


48, 48, 44 


Corporal, . 


Vincent, F. H., 




- 


s. s., 


47, 46, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Wood, W. G., . 




1st Mass., E, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


Private, 


Burt, J. A., 




- 


1st Class, 


43,44, - 


<( 


Hayes, E., 




- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


<( 


Powers, P. A., . 




- 


1st do. 


42, 45, - 


<( 


Smith, C. W., . 




- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


(i 


Aikin, A. J., 




1st Mass., E, 


2d do. 


20,20 


Corporal, . 


Babbitt, J. W., Jr., 




_ 


2d do. 


19 


23 


a 


Daniels, J. A., Jr., 




- 


2d do. 


19 


20 


Private, 


Daroll, B. G., . 




- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


«< 


Dodds, J., Jr., . 




_ 


2d do. 


18 


18 


a 


Downey, P. J., 




- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


<< 


Duchesney, C. E., 




- 


2d do. 


20 


21 


it 


Farrell, W., . 




- 


2d do. 


20 


22 


a 


Forand, P , 




- 


2d do. 


20 


21 


<< 


Forsblom, C. H., 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Ganthier, M., . 




- 


2d do. 


21 


21 


(< 


Hartley, W , . 




1st R. I., C, 


2d do. 


19 


19 


a 


Haughey, P. M., 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


(« 


Johnson, J. F., 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


Corporal, . 


Loftus, T. A., . 




- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


Private, 


McAvoy, C. A., 




- 


2d do. 


19 


20 


a 


Mclntyre, E. K., 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<( 


Millitte, L., 




- 


2d do. 


21 


23 


«( 


MaquiD, L., 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Moore, W. J., . 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


«< 


Nelson, W. B., 




- 


2d do. 


20 


22 


<« 


Perry, J. B., . 




- 


2d do. 


20 


22 


<< 


Povey, J. E., . 




- 


2d do. 


19 


21 


<< 


Russell, A. F., . 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Scales, T., 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


e< 


Shields, J. J., . 




1st Mass., E, 


2d do. 


21 


21 


Sergeant, . 


Snell, E. L., . 




- 


2d do. 


18 


22 


Private, 


Wilkinson, L., . 




- 


2d do. 


21 


21 


<< 


Willmott, L. L , 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


«( 


Zerbone, A. J., 




- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


C( 


Bird, H. A., . 




- 


3d do. 


16 


17 


(« 


Brown, G. H., . 




- 


3d do. 


15 


18 


(« 


Butts, H.,. 




- 


3d do. 


16 


18 


<< 


Freddette, A , . 




- 


3d do. 


16 


17 


<i 


Mangham, J. F., 




- 


3d do. 


16 


17 


«« 


Nolan, F. F., . 




- 


3d do. 


15 


16 


<< 


Noyer, RE., . 




- 


3d do. 


15 


18 


(( 


Nault, A., 




- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


(1 


Rawcliffe, A., . 




- 


3d do. 


15 


18 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 3 
Sharpshooters, . . . .16 
First class marksmen, . . 4 



Second class marksmen, . . 30 
Third class marksmen, . . 9 
Total, —62 



BATTERY F, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Private, 


Baker, H. F., . 






S. 


s., 


45, 


47, 


43 


a 


Buck, F. H., . 


- 




S. 


s., 


45, 


46, 


45 


Sergeant, . 


Bullard, F. A. D., . 


1st Mass. 


F, 


s. 


s, 


46, 


48, 


45 


Captain, 


Danforth, Norris O., 


1st Mass. 


F, 


s. 


s., 


45, 


46, 


43 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



103 



BATTERY F, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Rounseville, H. J., . 




S. S., 


49, 48, 47 


Sergeant, . 


Shaw, E. H., . 




1st Mass., F, 


S. 5 


>•» 


47, 48, 43 


Corpora], . 


Cobbett, W. A., 




1st Mass., F, 


1st Class, 


42, 46, - 


Lieutenant, 


Crowell, A. K., 




1st Mass., F, 


1st 


do. 


46,43, - 


Sergeant, . 


Dean, F. 0., . 




1st Mass., F, 


1st 


do. 


44,43, - 


Corporal, . 


Hathaway, C. G., 




- 


1st 


do. 


46,46, - 


Private, 


McNamara, M. J., 




- 


1st 


do. 


44, 44, - 


Corporal, . 


Millerd, A W., 




- 


1st 


do. 


45,43, - 


Private, 


Seekell, G. T., . 




1st Mass., F, 


1st 


do. 


45,43, - 


«< 


Thayer, C. J., . 




- 


1st 


do. 


44, 44, - 


Sergeant, . 


Bagse, J. J., 




1st Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


Private, 


Browne, J. E., . 




_ 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


Corporal, . 


Browne, 0. S., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


, 19 


Private, 


Cunningham, T., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18 


, 19 




' . . 


Dunn, Wm. J., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


,20 




' . . 


Eaton, G. F., . 




1st Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 




' . . 


Griswold, H. L., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


22 




' . • 


Harkins, W. F., 




_ 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 




' . . 


Hathaway, H. C., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18 


,20 




' . . 


Hutehins, L. A , 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


,20 






Jovce, J. J., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


,22 






Kelley, L. G., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


23 


,23 




' . . 


Macomber, A. H., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


,20 




' . . 


Marsden, L., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


18 


, 19 




' . , 


McDonald, J. A., 




- 


2d 


do. 


19 


,19 




' . . 


McKechnie, A., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18 


, 19 




' . . 


Nickerson, E. E., 




_ 


2d 


do. 


18 


, 18 




' . . 


Perry, C. E., . 




_ 


2d 


do. 


22 


22 


Lieutenant, 


Phillips, F. H., 




1st Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


21 


, 19 


1st Sergeant, 


Potter, W. N., . 




1st Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


20 


, 18 


Corporal, . 


Thacher,W. D., 




1st Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


19 


19 


Private, 


Viles, W. W., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 




' . . 


Walker, H. M., 




- 


2d 


do. 


20 


21 




' . 


Walsh, P. J., . 




_ 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 




' . . 


Bates, H. A., . 




_ 


3d 


do. 


18 


17 




' . . 


Bonner, E. W., 


'. 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15 


17 




' . . 


Butler, T. S., . 




_ 


3d 


do. 


18 


16 




' . 


Folsom, S. H.,. 




- 


3d 


do. 


19 


16 




' . , 


Cunningham, A. L., 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 




' . . 


Granfleld, T. F., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 




' . . 


Hanrahan, W. J., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 




' . . 


Hoxie, E. D., . 




_ 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 




' . 


Lamont, H. J., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 




' -. . 


Latham, H. W., 




- 


3d 


do. 


19 


15 




* • . 


McDonald, T., . 




_ 


3d 


do. 


18 


17 




' . . 


McGuire, J. P., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 




' . . 


Mitchell, J., 




- 


3d 


do. 


18 


16 




' . 


Moore, F. C, . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 






Nevitt, E. G., . 




6th Mass., E, 


3d 


do. 


17 


15 




' . . 


Nevitt, F. L , . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 




' . . 


Pelletier, J. B., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


18 




' . . 


Peltier, F. C, . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


18 


Corporal, . 


Phillips, H. T., 




- 


3d 


do. 


17, 


16 


Private, 


Sheehan, D. F., 




- 


3d 


do. 


17, 


16 


a 


Sprague, B. E., 




_ 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 


<< 


Woodward, R. L., 




_ 


3d 


do. 


16 


20 


<< 


Wales, F. H., . 




— 


3d 


do. 


- 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen, 



24 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified member, 
Total, . 



23 
1 

— 62 



104 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



BATTERY G, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








1st Sergeant, 


Earle, Willam J., 


1st Mass., G, 


S. S 


•> 


44, 46, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Fiske, Arthur P., 


1st Mass., G, 


s. s 


•» 


49, 48, 46 


Captain, 


Chick, Albert B., 


1st Mass., G, 


1st Class, 


42, 42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Keefe, John J., 


1st Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


45,44, - 


(« 


Pendoley, John J., . 


1st Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Corporal, . 


Merry, Howard L., . 


1st Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


44, 42, - 


a 


Pettingill, George I., 


- 


1st 


do. 


43, 43, - 


it 


Williams, Benjamin F., . 


1st Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


43, 42, - 


Private, 


Littleton, William H., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 45, - 


<( 


Murphy, James M., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


t< 


Norton, Henry, 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 45, - 


<( 


Pendoley, Frank C, 


1st Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


43, 42, - 


Lieutenant, 


Wilson, Frank S., . 


1st Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


a 


Wiley, John P., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Whitney, Roy F., . 


1st Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Cullen, Charles V., . 


1st Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


Corporal, . 


Buswell, John A., . 


1st Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<( 


Buttery, William F., 


1st Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Haynes, Clifton M., 


1st Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


(( 


McLaughlin, Thos. B., Jr. 


1st Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Aechtler, Charles H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


a 


Chase, Josiah W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Chellman, J. Edwin, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Farrell, Arthur H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Farrell, Frederick L., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


<< 


Hill, William B., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


<« 


Holman, Herbert H., 


5th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


(( 


Holman, Walter J., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


<( 


Morgan, Alvin R., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Jackson, Alton F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


<( 


Jones, Albert, . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


ft 


Sawyer, Carroll R., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


u 


Washburn, Harry W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


a 


Wilson, Andrew T., 


9th Mass., D, 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


(( 


Arris, Charles E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Blake, Alfred H., . 


6th Mass , E, 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<< 


Bradbury, Charles F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


a 


Burckhardt, Edward F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Carnie, Andrew F , . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(( 


Cooley, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


a 


Crotty, James F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


<( 


Creelman, David W., 


Hosp. Corps 
and Train. 


3d 


do. 


18, 17 


<< 


Creelman, Russell A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 15 


<« 


Driscoll, Henry J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


(< 


Evinson, George L., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Goggin, James B., . 


9th Mass., D, 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<< 


Harrington, Timothy H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Hurlebans, William H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


«< 


Keleher, John P , . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<( 


Kerwin, Henry F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Musician, . 


Lordan, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Private, 


Martin, John, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 15 


<( 


McElroy, John E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<« 


McMullen, Samuel J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


« 


Messenger, Henry G., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Morehead, Robert A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Scott, Thomas A , . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«« 


Shaw, Edward B , . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Stitt, William H , . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<< 


Tucker, Frank 0., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17. 15 


<< 


Weaving, Arthur E. J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 



Sharpshooters, .... 2 
First class marksmen, . . 10 
Second class marksmen, . . 22 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



27 



61 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



105 



BATTERY H, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



' 




Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Captain, 


Pratt, Walter L., . 


1st Mass., H, 


S. 


S., 


48, 47, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Renfrew, William, . 


1st Mass , H, 


s. 


S., 


45, 48, 44 


tt 


Grant, Bertie E., 


1st Mass., H, 


s. 


S, ' 


46, 46, 42 


Q. M. Sergeant,. 


Newman, William G., 


1st Mass., H, 


s. 


S., 


45, 46, 46 


Sergeant, . 


Bearce, Charles F-, . 


1st Mass., H, 


s. 


s., 


47, 46, 45 


Corporal, . 


Rice, Harry E., 


1st Mass , H, 


s. 


s., 


45, 46, 43 


<« 


Durgin, Charles F., . 


1st Mass., H, 


s. 


s., 


44, 46, 45 


Private, 


Farrell, Edgar G., . 


1st Mass., H, 


s. 


s., 


47, 46, 42 


<< 


McDonald, Frank, . 


1st Mass., H, 


s. 


s., 


44, 46, 42 


(< 


Young. Roderick B , 


1st Mass., H, 


s. 


s., 


44, 47, 46 


Sergeant, . 


Cutcliffe, Lawrence H., . 


1st Mass., H, 


1st Class, 


48,47, - 


Corporal, . 


Bradley, James T., . 


1st Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Private, 


Dolliver, Thomas H., 


1st Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


45,43, - 


<( 


Hastings, Donald M., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 43, - 


<( 


McDonald, Peter D , 


- 


1st 


do. 


48, 45, - 


Sergeant, . 


Brewer, John E., 


1st Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Grant, Nathan A., . 


1st Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Bird, Joseph F., 


1st Mass , H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Brown, Gordon D. W., . 


1st Mass , H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


tt 


Pendleton, Clarence A., . 


1st Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


Musician, . 


Burns, William, 


1st Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Arderberg, Edwin H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


«( 


Bell, Herbert, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Burwell, Walter S., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


<< 


Carolan, Phillip B , . 


5th Mass., D, 


2d 


do. 


20, 21 


«( 


Carafa, Joseph C, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


. ** 


Ellis, Edward, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


<«. 


Foley, Thomas J., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


«< 


Hill, William L., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


tt 


Havcy, George, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 20 


a 


Jennings, Frank E., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


it 


Johnson, Amasa M., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


20,22 


a 


Lee, Lewis H., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Pierce, William A., Jr., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


<( 


Parsons, William H., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


tt 


Roure, Louis G., 


5th Mass , A, 


2d 


do. 


22,23 


n 


Simmons, Harry J. B., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


ti 


Turner, Ernest E., . . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


22, 23 


(c 


Twoomey, Michael H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Young, T. Elwood, . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


19,22 


1st Sergeant, 


Meek, Warren L., . 


1st Mass., H, 


3d 


do. 


17, 18 


Corpora], . 


Rodcliffe, William H , . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


'Private, 


Archer, Frederick J., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<( 


Bangs, Edward J., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«< 


Barrett, John C, 


1st Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


(< 


Beach, John F-, 


_ 


3d 


do. 


17,18 


«< 


Bostwick, Charles S., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 18 


a 


Bradley, William F., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


a 


Briggs, Charles A., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


n 


Burr, Edgar E., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


it 


Carolan, Joseph A., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


tt 


Gallant, Moses A , . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 19 


tt 


Gilmore, Alfred S., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


a 


Gibbs, Charles B., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


41 


Heldt, George J., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


«< 


Hudgins, George W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


1< 


House, Joseph L., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


it 


Isbister, Edward W., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


it 


Madden, Thomas L., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


tt 


Miller, John H., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


it 


McNamara, Hugh, . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


It 


Nagel, Charles A., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


it 


Smith, William F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen, 



10 

5 

25 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



23 



63 



106 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



BATTERY I, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Captain, 

Q. M. Sergeant, 

Corporal, . 



Private, 

Lieutenant, 

1st Sergeant, 

Sergeant, 
<( 

Corporal, 

a 

Private, 



Lieutenant, 

Sergeant, 

Corporal, 

Bugler, 
Private, 



Horton, George E., . 
Clark, Charles E., . 
Hammond, Horace B., 
Gould, Charles A., . 
Churchill, William F., 
Warren, William A., 
Nilsson, Wellington H., 
Allen, William S., . 
Edson, Charles H., . 
Foye, Lewis M., 
Reed, Augustus S , . 
Maxim, Frederick W., 
Burt, Morton W., . 
Cochrane, William, . 
Johnson, John W., . 
Mattson, Charles, . 
Nilsson, Tristram J., 
Nelson, Rudolph S., 
Swanson, Oscar E., . 
Thorne, John M., . 
Sampson, Samuel B., 
Varney, George A., . 
Reed, Harry S., 
Osborn, Chester W., 
Abbott, Frank H., . 
England. William, . 
Ashley, Alfred A., . 
Ashley, Pearlie G., . 
Brooks, Charles C, . 
Brewer, Wallace R., 
Black, Fred. H, 
Cook, Samuel W., . 
Cross, Charles L., . 
Hurry, John A., 
Hurst, Everett A., . 
Ide, John H., . 
Ide, George L., 
Jones, Wallace W., . 
Johnson, Frank E, . 
MacDonald, Frank A., 
Moister, Charles, 
Nelson, Gustave J., . 
Prescott, Edwin E ,. 
Peck, Ernest A., 
Ripley, John W., . 
Smith, Edwin 0., 
Woodard, Charles F., 
Wood, Harold A., . 
Williamson, John F., 
Wells, Burleigh S., . 
Salin, Edward A., . 
Bussey, William H. J., 
Derry, William H., . 
Godbout, Ernest N., 
Marsh, George L., . 
Thompson, Harold R., 
Winch, Frank W., . 
Whittier, John W., . 
Youlden, William H , 
Willis, H. Elliott, . 
Gibbs, Harry F , 
Erwin, Harry M., . 



1st Mass., I, 

1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass , I, 

1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass , I, 
1st Mass., I, 



1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass., I, 
1st Mass., I, 



1st Mass., I, 



5th Mass., I, 



S. S., 
S. S., 
S. S., 
S. S., 
S. S., 
S.S., 
1st Class, 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 



3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 



49, 49, 42 

46, 47, 43 

47, 47, 46 
46, 47, 47 
45, 46, 43 
45, 46, 42 
45, 42, - 

42.42, - 
42, 43, - 

45.43, - 
42, 42, - 

47.44, - 
45, 42, - 
42,44, - 
43,42, - 
42,42, - 
43,42, - 
44,42, - 
42, 42, - 
42,42, - 

21, 21 



23 
21 
20 
18 
18 
22 
18 
18 
18 
18 
19 
18 
18 
19 
18 
18 
18 
18 
19 
21 
18 
18 
21 
18 
19 
21 
20 
18 
19 
19 
17 
15 
16 
16 
18 
19 
15 
17 
17 



18 
21 
21 
19 
18 
22 
19 
18 
19 
19 
20 
20 
18 
18 
18 
19 
18 
18 
19 
21 
19 
18 
19 
18 
19 
21 
20 
19 
20 
19 
19 
16 
16 
16 
17 
15 
15 
18 
19 



Sharpshooters, .... 6 
First class marksmen, . . 15 
Second class marksmen, - . .32 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified member, 
Total, . 



9 
1 
— 63 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



107 



BATTERY K, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Bugler, 


Ripley, Winfield S., Jr., . 


1st Mass., K, 


D. M., 


50, 50, 47 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Barker, Edward, 


1st Mass., K, 


S. S., 


44, 47, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Pasek, Henry A., 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46*, 44 


it 


Richards, Frank L., 


1st Mass., K, 


s. s., 


47, 47, 45 


it 


Mclnnis, Edward G., 




s. s., 


49, 50, 49 


Corporal, . 


Sedley, Allen L., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 47, 44 


a 


Raymond, Edward W., . 


- 


s. s., 


47, 46, 42 


(< 


Cundall, Frank B., . 


- 


S. o ., 


46, 48, 45 


Private, 


Davis, Irving J., 


1st Mass., K, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 47 


<( 


Ferguson, John H., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 48, 49 


Sergeant, . 


Batson, Walter V., . 


- 


1st Class, 


42, 45, - 


Corporal, . 


Kendall, Albert L., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


Private, 


Heron, Charles R., . 


_ 


1st do. 


44, 44, - 


<< 


Korb, William H., . 


- 


1st do. 


44,42, - 


<( 


Shanahan, Walter D., 


- 


1st do. 


42,43, - 


<( 


Smith, William D., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 46, - 


it 


Vialle, Ralph S., . 


- 


1st do. 


44, 45, - 


Lieutenant, 


Gerlach, Conrad M., 


_ 


2d do. 


19,19 


Sergeant, . 


Carey, Edward G., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Reubens, Moses I. F., 


1st Mass., K, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Sands, Luther J., 


- 


2d do. 


21,21 


Private, 


Abrams, David, 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 19 


(< 


Allen, Harry B., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


a 


Ashley, Walter, 


- 


2d do. 


19, 21 


it 


Clegg, Victor K., 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 


it 


Connor, John H. F., 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 


a 


Curtis, Carroll C , . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


it 


Drown, Frank S., 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<« 


Edmonds, Herbert E., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


<< 


Gallup, Frank H., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,18 


<< 


Green, Richard G-, . 


- 


2d do. 


21,22 


<< 


Newman, Joseph P., 


- 


2d do. 


22, 18 


u 


Stone, William B., . 


- . 


2d do. 


18,20 


«« 


Voye, Vernon J., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


(« 


Zerbel, Fred A., 


_ 


2d do. 


20,21 


Corporal, . 


Doherty, John, 


- 


3d do. 


16,17 


Private, 


Ashman, Alfred A., . 


- 


3d do. 


18, 17 


«( 


Bailey, Charles J., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 


(< 


Bullard, Edwin E., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Farrell, Archibald A., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 


(< 


Freeman, Charles, . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 15 


(< 


Gandley, James, 


- 


3d do. 


19, 17 


<« 


James, Edwin W., . 


_ 


3d do. 


19, 17 


<< 


Stebbins, George B., 


- 


3d do. 


18,17 


Captain, 


Howes, Frederic S., 


1st Mass., K, 


1st do. 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Gleason, Albert A., . 


1 1st Mass., K, 


2d do. 


- 


Private, 


Barrows, Oscar A., . 


_ 


3d do. 


_ 


(< 


Bott, Royal P., 


- 


1st do. 


- 


<( 


Graves, Elmer A., . 


1st Mass., K, 


1st do. 


- 


H 


Macurdy, Arthur J , 


- 


2d do. 


- 


a 


Montague, Henrv, . 


- 


2d do. 


- 


u 


Rodgers, James H., 


_ 


1st do. 


_ 


it 


Young, Edward F., 


■" 


2d do. 


■■ 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters, .... 9 

First class marksmen, . . 11 

Second class marksmen, . . 22 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



10 
7 
— 60 



108 



ADJUTANT GEXEEAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



BATTERY L, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 







Service in TJ. S. 1 








Bank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Eegt. and Co. 








1 

Lieutenant, 


French, Alton L , 


1st Mass., L, 


S. S 


•5 


45, 49, 43 


Captain, 


Whiting, Frederic M., 


1st Mass., L, 


2d Class, 


18,20 


Lieutenant, 


Harris, Clifford L., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


20,22 


1st Sergeant, 


Naumann, Louis, 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Fitz william, Frank M., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Frank, Harry M., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Wells, Jarvis A., 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Warner, Harry A., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


c< 


Henius, Walter A., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(( 


Mitchell, Ralph L., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<( 


Frank, Maurice A., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


Musician, . 


Porter, Wilfred H., . 


8th Mass. ,M, 
1st Mass., 
L. 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


Corporal, . 


Davis, Franklin E., . 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Bail, Herbert N., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Billcliffe, Thomas W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Brown, Frank A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


k 


Boden, Courtland B., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


a 


Dyer, Frederick H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


<( 


Ellsworth, Walter F., . 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Fogarty, Harry W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


a 


Fotch, Julius A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


it 


Fraser George L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


<< 


Gage, Frank A., 


1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


«( 


Gannett, Arthur S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


(< 


Hannaford, John J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


« 


Kelley, James J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


«« 


Lewisson, Clarence P., 


j 1st Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


n 


Leavitte, Alvin B., . 




2d 


do. 


18,20 


a 


McCusker, William P., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<( 


McLean, Robert W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Needham, Edgar H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


«< 


O'Neil, Harry J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


c< 


Phipps, Napoleon J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


<< 


Sanford, Herman L, 


2d Art'y, C 
and H, 1st 
Mass.,L. 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


ct 


Sauer, Fred A., 


1st Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


cc 


Scarborough, Alexander, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(( 


Sullivan, Joseph M., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


it 


Swartout, Ernest R., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 18 


<( 


Yose, John, Jr., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Wilmarth, Harvey F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


(< 


Wolf, Louis A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Brown, Charles H., . 


1st Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Corporal, . 


Foster, Maurice F., . 


1st Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


ct 


Burton, Morton J., . 


2d Art'y, G, 


3d 


do. 


18, 15 


Private, 


Corbett, Bernard, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Curtin, Frank E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<( 


Clark, Robert R., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Devlin, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


K 


Ellis, George S., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Fontain, William A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 19 


<< 


Fish, Frank D., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,17 


k 


Jackson, Harry C, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Kane, Francis G., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 17 


<( 


Liston, William A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(! 


McLaughlin, John H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(< 


Moffatt, William C, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(< 


Murphy, Robert C, . 


2d Art'y, G, 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



109 



BATTERY L, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY — Concluded. 



Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 
<< 

a 


Stiles, Harry A , . 
Wilner, Joseph, 

York, William A., . 
Yates, Robert A., 


2d Art'y, C 
and G. 


3d Class, 
3d do. 

3d do. 
3d do. 


16, 16 
17,17 

15, 15 



Sharpshooter, .... 1 
Second class marksmen, . . 40 
Third class marksmen, . . 20 



Unqualified member, 
Total, . 



62 



BATTERY M, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Captain, 
Lieutenant, 


1st Sergeant, 
Sergeant, . 


<< 


Corporal, . 
«< 




<( 


(< 


Bugler, 
Private, 


<< 
<< 


(< 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 
Corporal, . 
Private, 




(( 


«« 


(( 


a 


<< 


Sergeant, . 
Private, 




a 


(< 
<< 


cc 

«; 


« 


<( 



Fuller, David, . 
Harrison, Fred W., . 
Meek, William J., . 
Pilkington, Edward H., 
Harrison, Paul, 
Wood, Richard H., . 
Eldridge, Myron O., 
Murphy, Thomas, . 
Rig by, John, . 
Bailey, James E., . 
Marsden, George, 
Chippendale, Thomas J. 
Robinson, John T., . 
Deardon, Fred, 
Charlton, Charles H., 
Marland, John, 
McGuire, John, 
Mercer, Albert, 
Morrow, Thomas A., 
Thomas, William H., 
Davis, Elmer F., 
Waterworth, William, 
Adams, Thomas T., 
Delancev, Fred A., . 
Dunnigan, John T., . 
Hardy, James F., . 
Knott, Arthur G., . 
Read, Benjamin F., 
Sanford, Alvin C, . 
Walton, John, . 
Woodruff, William J., 
Zaiser, John D., 
Buckley, Zedekiah, . 
Borden, Edgar L., . 
Cation, Henry E., . 
Channell, Frank D., 
Cooper, Samuel B , . 
Crosson, George F. A., 
Devitfc, Peter,' . 
Graham, Charles, 
Holden, William H., 
Hurst, John, . 
Lambert, Fred A., . 
Leach, John W., 
Leach, James, Jr., . 



1st Mass.,M 
1st Mass., M 

1st Mass ,M 

1st Mass., M 
1st Mass.,M 
1st Mass., M 
1st Mass., M 
1st Mass.,M 
1st Mass.,M 
1st Mass., M 
1st Mass.,M 
1st Mass., M 



1st Mass., M, 
1st Mass., M, 



8th Mass., C, 
1st Mass., M, 

1st Mass., M, 



S. S. 

s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 

1st Class, 
1st do. 



1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



46, 47, 42 
45, 46, 43 

44, 48, 43 

45, 46, 43 

46, 48, 47 

46, 46, 45 

44, 47, 43 
48, 46, 44 

47, 47. 47 

45, 46, 43 
45, 46, 44 

45, 47, 46 

46, 46, 42 

45, 48, 44 

46, 46, 42 

47, 46, 45 

44, 47, 42 

45, 47, 45 

45, 47, 46 

46, 47, 46 
44,43, - 

44.43, - 
44,48, - 
46,47, - 

42.44, - 

42.45, - 
44, 44, - 
42, 42, - 
42, 42, - 
43,42, - 
42, 44, - 
44, 42, - 

20,21 
20,20 
21, 21 
18, 19 
20,21 
18,21 

18, 19 

19, 20 
20,20 

20, 18 
19,20 

18, 19 

19, 19 



110 ADJUTANT GEISTEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



BATTERY M, FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Bank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


McAvoy, Samuel, . 


. 


2d Class, 


18, 18 


(« 


Mclninch, Henry, . 


- 


2d do. 


21,23 


(< 


McKenzie, John G., 


- 


2d do. 


21,21 


(< 


McNulty, John F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


a 


Mitchell, Elmer W., 


1st Mass.,M, 


2d do. 


17, 19 


(« 


Morgan, John J., 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 


(( 


Murphy, John D., . 


- • 


2d do. 


18,22 


it 


Norton, Charles, 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


a 


Parks, Joseph, 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


(< 


Pickup, Robert H., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,21 


<< 


Sevigney, Alfred J., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


«< 


Water worth, Alfred, 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


<< 


Waterhouse, J. S., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


(< 


Bordman, Frank H., 


_ 


3d do. 


15,16 


<c 


Dynes, John F., 


5th Mass., M, 


3d do. 


16,18 


c< 


Gavin, Thomas H., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,17 


it 


McLachlan, John H., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


«< 


Williams, Samuel N., 


— 


3d do. 


15,17 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen, 



20 
12 
26 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, 



o 
— 63 



FIELD AND STAFF, SECOND INFANTRY. 



Major, 


Fairbanks, Henry B., 


2d Mass., 


S.S., 


44, 46, 44 


Chief Bugler, 


Ladbury, Henry F., 


2d Mass., B, 


s. s., 


44, 48, 42 


Lieutenant, 


Mathewson, Ralph E., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


Captain, 


Parsons, William E., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 48, 45 


Major, 


Pierce, Frederick E., 


2d Mass., L, 


s. s., 


45, 48, 42 


Lieut. Colonel, . 


Shumway, Edwin R., 


2d Mass., 


s. s., 


47, 47, 44 


Captain, 


Williams, Abraham C, . 


- 


1st Class, 


42,44 


Lieutenant, 


Shaw, Thomas B , . 


- 


1st do. 


42,43 


Major, 


Gates, Ernest A., 


2d Mass., 


2d do. 


20,22 


Sergeant, . 


Klein, William H., . 


- 


2d do. 


22,22 


Orderly, 


Mooney, Edward F., 


2d Mass., M, 


3d do. 


18,17 


Lieutenant, 


Allen, Frank L., 


2d Mass., C, 


8,8., 


- 


Color Sergeant, . 


Barton, William E., 


2d Mass., C, 


S.S., 


- 


Drum Major, 


Bickford, Charles M., 


- 


1st Class, 


- 


Colonel, 


Clark, Embury P., . 


2d Mass., 


S. S , 


- 


Captain, 


Edson, Archibald C, 


- 


1st Class, 


- 


Sergeant Major, . 


Hall, George B , 


2d Mass., K, 


S. S., 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Hitchcock, Charles B., . 


- 


2d Class, 


- 


<< 


Norton, Paul J., 


- 


S. S., 


- 


P. M. Sergeant, . 


Nichols, Bert F., . 


2d Mass., K, 


2d Class, 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Kelley, J. Lewis, 


2d Mass., K, 


2d do. 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Parkhurst, Harry H., 


2d Mass., K, 


1st do. 


- 


Com. Sergeant, . 


Ross, Robert A., 


2d Mass., G, 


S. S., 


- 


Major, 


Southmayd, Frederick G., 


2d Mass., 


D. M., 


- 


Captain, 


Sawtell, Edward E., 


2d Mass., 


1st Class, 


- 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Snow, Melvin N., 


— 


1st do. 


— 



Distinguished marksman, . 1 

Sharpshooters 12 

First class marksmen, . . 7 

Second class marksmen, . . 5 



Third class marksman, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



29 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



Ill 



COMPANY A, SECOND INFANTRY. 







i 
Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Sergeant, . 


McTaggart, David D., . 


_ 


D. M., 


46, 49, 42 


Captain, 


Barrett, Edwin G., . 


2d Mass., A, 


S. S., 


45, 46, 46 


Lieutenant, . 


Tisdell, Moses H , . 


2d Mass., A, 


S. s., 


46, 47, 46 


<< 


Lticke, Frederick H., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 47, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Poland, Charles A., . 


2d Mass., A, 


s. s., 


44, 50, 45 


<< 


Laflamme, Joseph T , 


2d Mass., A, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 46 


Corporal, . 


Cooper, Benjamin, . 


2d Mass., A, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


Private, 


Allison, George E., . 


2d Mass., A, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 44 


<< 


Clem, George W., . 


- 


s. s., 


47, 46, 42 


a 


Damarell, Leith A., . 


- 


s s., 


44, 47, 42 


<« 


Jones, George, . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 45 


(( 


Lamberton, Charles F , . 


2d Mass., A, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 47 


«( 


Magee, Arthur C, . 


2d Mass., A, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 45 


it 


Spring, Henry G., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


t< 


Thomson, Alexander G., 


2d Mass., A, 


s. s., 


47, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


Green, Ralph C, 


2d Mass., A, 


1st Class, 


44, 42, - 


(< 


Murray, Archie F., . 


2d Mass., A, 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


Private, 


Bullard, Henry A., . 


- 


1st do. 


44,42, - 


c< 


Macomber, Henry W., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


<< . 


Wedge, Arthur J., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Hagberg, John G., . 


2d Mass., A, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Gowans, David, Jr., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


(C 


Workman, Robert C , 


- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


(« 


Goodwin, Wilmot C, • . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


19 


(< 


Mills, Arthur G., . 


2d Mass., A, 


2d do. 


19 


18 


Private, 


Beiberback, Jacob, . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


•<< 


Ballantyne, Harris R., 


- 


2d do. 


21 


23 


u ' 


Coley, Henry G., 


2d Mass., A, 


2d do. 


18 


18 


«( 


Cunningham, Edward F., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


20 


<< 


Cole, James A., 


2d Mass., A, 


2d do. 


19 


18 


(( 


Dand, Thomas R , . 


_ 


2d do. 


21 


21 


(( 


Forrest, Ovide A., . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


22 


«( 


Gifford, Clarence W , 


- 


2d do. 


22 


22 


<( 


Gould, George M., . 


- 


2d do. 


22 


19 


«< 


Hazelhurst, Joseph,. 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


«( 


Inett, William H., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


(( 


Johnson, Ernest E., . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


21 


<< 


James, Charles H., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18 


18 


«< 


Liberty, Henry L., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


(( 


Moon, James E., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


18 


(( 


Mcintosh, George S., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


(( 


Northridge, John, . 


- 


2d do. 


23 


21 


«( 


Sampson, Herbert M., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


21 


(( 


Stockbridge, Ernest L., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


«« 


Thompson, George W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


(( 


Williams, George L , 


- 


2d do. 


21 


18 


<< 


Wakefield, George A., 


- 


2d do. 


23 


22 


<t 


Young, Charles W., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


18 


Musician, . 


Gagnon, Frederick C-, 


2d Mass., A, 


3d do. 


16 


16 


Private, 


Ayres, Thomas F., . 


- 


3d do. 


17 


17 


«« 


Collins, Charles F., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


19 


<< 


Cheney, Clarence G., 




3d do. 


18 


16 


(< 


Edwards, Lester B., 


_ 


3d do. 


18 


16 


<« 


Perry, C. Frederick, 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 


<( 


Reed, Ernest'C, 


_ 


3d do. 


16 


18 


(< 


Rice, William W., . 


2d Mass., A, 


3d do. 


17 


17 


<i 


Wheeler, Fred. C, . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


<« 


Wray, Joseph H., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


Sergeant, . 


Sawyer, Elbridge B., 


2d Mass., A, 


1st do. 


_ 


<< 


Allison, Walter H., . 


2d Mass., A, 


s. S., 


_ 


Private, 


Rousseau, Joseph A., 


- 


2d Class, 


- 



Distinguished marksman, . 1 

Sharpshooters, . . . .15 
First class marksmen, . . 6 



Second class marksmen, . . 29 
Third class marksmen, . . 10 
Total, . . . . . —61 



112 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY B, SECOND INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Daniels, Fred R., 




D. M., 


50, 49, 49 


Private, 


Johnson, Ernest V., 


_ 


D.M., 


48, 48, 45 


1st Sergeant, 


Wakefield, Frank A., 


2d Mass., B, 


D. M., 


50, 50, 47 


Private, 


Burger, Ernest R., . 


- 


S. S., 


44, 46, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Devine, Daniel S., . 


2d Mass., B, 


S. s., 


46, 47, 42 


Corporal, . 


Griffin. Leroy A., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 47, 43 


Private, 


Hamberg, John A., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


(i 


Morgan, Lewis, 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


<( 


Pannier, Henry, 


- 


s. s., 


47, 47, 43 


Corpora], . 


Roberts, Henry P., . 


2d Mass., B, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


Musician, . 


Rosenberg, Albert C, 


- 


S.S., 


44, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


Ryan, Matthew P., . 


2d Mass., B, 


S.S., 


45, 46, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Wakefield, Harry C, 


2d Mass., B, 


S. S., 


49, 49, 46 


Lieutenant, 


Wilcox, Everett W., 


2d Mass., B, 


s. s., 


47,47,42 


Private, 


Wright, Edwin W., . 


2d Mass., B, 


s. s., 


45, 47, 42 


<t 


Guthrie, Walter E , . 


- 


1st Class, 


44, 44, - 


(< 


Hogan, William F., 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


Lieutenant, 


O'Connell, John J., . 


2d Mass., B, 


1st do. 


43,42, -- 


Private, 


Belenis, Costas P., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


a 


Berggren, J. F. Bernard, 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


Captain, 


Burke, Thomas F., . . 


2d Mass., B, 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Connor, Frank J., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


<< 


Conway, Thomas P., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


•Sergeant, . 


Childs, William F., . 


2d Mass., B, 


2d do. 


20, 19 


41 


Draper, Robert D., . 


2d Mass., B, 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Private, 


Folsom, Star, . 


- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


a 


Hudson, John W., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


(( 


James, Albert E., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


a 


Mack, Cornelius W., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«« 


Norris, Frank, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, . 


O'Connor, William H., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


Private. 


Powers, James F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Weeks, Alfred J., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Private, 


Cummings, Phil F., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


n 


Dunscomb, Albert M., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Ellsworth, Geo. A., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Gaffoey, William J., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Hayes, John D. E., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


(< 


Henderson, Robert E., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


<( 


James, Chas. W., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 15 


i< 


Larson, John W., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


a 


Lopez, Froilan, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


tc 


McCarthy, Tim. D , 


- 


3d do. 


16,17 


<i 


Meagher, William J., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Oliver, Robert E., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


a 


Schelb, August W., 


- 


3d do. 


17,17 


<< 


Vincent, Frank H., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Weber, Emil G., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


a 


Wilson, James, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


a 


Richardson, Arthur D., . 


— 


3d do. 


" 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 3 

Sharpshooters, . . . .12 

First class marksmen, . . 3 

Second class marksmen, . . 15 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



17 
3 
— 53 



COMPANY C, SECOND INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 
Private, 



Clark. Frederick, Jr., 
Crandall, Harris M., 
Good, Fred P., . 




44, 47, 43 

45, 47, 42 
44, 47, 42 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



113 



COMPANY C, SECOND INFANTRY — Concluded. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Private, 

Corporal, 

Private, 

< t 

Sergeant, 

Corporal, 

Private, 

Q. M. Sergi 

Private, 
(< 

Captain, 
Corporal, 
Private, 
Sergeant, 



1st Sergeant 

Private, 

<t. 

Lieutenant, 
Private, 



Corporal, 
Private, 



Corporal, 
Private, 



eant, 



Musician, 
Private, 



Corporal, 

Private, 

<< 

Corporal, 
Private, 



Greene, Harry H.. . 
Harford, Frederick A., 
Hastings, Harry L., 
Hobbs, Howard K.,. 
Jefferson, Adolphus D., 
Kincaid, Bert W., . 
Knibbs, Charles H., 
McCormick, William H, 
McCallum, Lewis M., 
Peterson, Charles A., 
Rebboli, Antoni F., . 
Rider, Phineas L , . 
Russell, Leonard W., 
Sampson, William H., 
Springer, Frank A , . 
Stebbins, George W., 
Stevenson, James C, 
Stevenson, William, 
Tinkham, Eugene L., 
Warren, George F., . 
Warren, Herbert H., 
Weixler, Jacob P., . 
Wilson, Herbert C, . 
Hewitt, Arthur B., . 
Holton, Charles E., . 
Johnson, Roland, 
Lang, John H., 
McKenzie, William R., 
Needham, William I., 
Porter, William A.. . 
Putnam, Herbert C, 
Robinson, Wallace M., 
Smith, Carl H., 
Streeter, Robert C, . 
Wallace, Arthur J., . 
Ward, Ralph W., . 
Anderson, John F., . 
Bugbee, Henry H, . 
Chase, Charles E., . 
Davis, Clarence T., . 
Densraore, John B., . 
Dodge, Frank E., . 
Dodge, Karl H , 
Drabble, George J., . 
Falardeau, Leo C, . 
Farrow, George S., . 
Havener, Mahlon E., 
Howe, George W., . 
Martin, Edward J., . 
McClellan, Leonard A., 
McKenna, John F., . 
Nichols, Eli F., 
Power, Edmund J., . 
Quimby, Luther H., 
Robinson, John R., . 

Scott, Henri A., 
Shedd, Thomas S., . 
Turner, Frank H., . 
■ Whiting, William I., 
Wilson, Karl F., 



2d Mass., A, 

2d Mass., C, 
2d Mass., C, 



2d Mass., C, 



2d Mass., C, 



2d Mass., C, 



2d Mass., C, 
2d Mass., C, 



3dConn.,Sgt. 
Major, 



S. S. 

s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 

D. M 

s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s., 

s. S. 

s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 

1st Class, 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

2d do 



2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 



u 


46, 


44 


46, 


45 


46, 


45 


46, 


48 


49, 


45 


46, 


44 


47, 


46 


46, 


48 


47, 


44 


46, 


45 


46, 


44 


47, 


48 


47, 


46 


46, 


46 


46, 


45 


48, 


46 


46, 


48 


46, 


49 


50, 


44 


46, 


44 


46, 


45 


47, 


44 


46, 


42 


43, 


42 


42, 


42 


46, 


42 


42, 


42 


42, 


43 


42, 


42 


42, 


42 


42, 


42 


45, 


42 


42, 


42 


42, 


42 


42, 


42 


42, 



44 
43 
45 
44 
43 
46 
43 
43 
43 
43 
44 
43 
44 
42 
46 
44 
42 
43 
44 
43 
42 
43 
42 



21 

22 
20 
19 
20 
18 
18 
18 
20 
21 
20 
20 
20 
19 
21 
20 
18 
20 
18 

19 
18 
21 
18 
18 



21 
19 
18 
21 
19 
18 
19 
19 
20 
21 
19 
22 
20 
19 
21 
18 
18 
18 
18 

19 

18 
19 
19 
18 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters 25 

First class marksmen, . . 13 



Second class marksmen, 
Total, . 



24 



63 



114 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY D, SECOND INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 






Bank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Captain, 


Phillips, Frank D., . 


2d Mass., D, 


S. S., 


46, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Foote, Alfred F., 


2d Mass., D, 


S. S., 


44, 46, 42 


n 


Reed, Alfred F., 


2d Mass., D, 


S. S., 


47, 48, 43 


1st Sergeant, 


Macdonald, Alexander, . 


2d Mass., D, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 44 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Slate, Edmund J., . 


2d Mass., D, 


s. s., 


48, 46, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Cain, Earle J., . 


2d Mass., D, 


s. s., 


44, 47, 43 


«< 


Slate, Frederick W., 


2d Mass., D, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 45 


<« 


Mack, Patrick J., . 


- 


s s., 


44, 46, 44 


Corporal, . 


Redfern, Frank W., 


- 


S.S., 


44, 46, 43 


<< 


Mayotte, Louis A., . 


, 


S. s., 


45, 47, 42 


«( 


Snow, Sylvester M., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 44 


<( 


Lemieux, "Victor, 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


Private, 


Dugas, George H., . 


- 


S.S., 


44, 47, 42 


«( 


Myers, Ellsworth C, 


_ 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


(< 


Pomper, Otto, . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


<< 


Robinson, Wilbur A., 


- 


s. s., 


48, 46, 43 


<« 


Smith, Sterling L., . 


- 


S.S., 


45, 46, 43 


<« 


Tuttle, Thomas W., 


- 


s. is., 


46, 47, 42 


Corporal, . 


Ezold, George W., . 


- 


1st Class, 


45, 42, - 


Musician, . 


Kelley, William H., 


- 


1st do. 


45, 42, - 


Private, 


Emery, Louis E., 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


<< 


Mathey, Louis, 


- 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


<< 


Stansfield, John A., 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Eaton, Joseph W., . 


2d Mass., D, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Tatro, George A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


,21 


a 


Sabourin, Leopold, . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


23 


Private, 


Bramham, Archie E., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


«< 


Beaulieux, John, 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


<< 


Butler, William H., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


<( 


Baker, Alfred J., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


20 


<( 


Cutting, Arthur A., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


,18 


«( 


Cobb, Henry A., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


, 19 


<< 


Clad, Emile, . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


«« 


Clarimont, Dennis, . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Engle, Bernard, 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


<< 


Fowles, Lynford P., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


<« 


Favreau, Edward P., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<« 


Griffin, Michael, 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


« 


Gero, Irving W., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


<< 


Gloster, James, 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


«« 


Herbert, Alexander, 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


<< 


Labonte, Gilbert, 


- 


2d do. 


21 


22 


a 


Landry, Adelard, 


- 


2d do. 


19 


20 


(< 


Lamson, Arthur W., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


20 


«< 


Moran, William E., 


- 


2d do. 


21 


22 


<« 


McCorkindale, Edward N. 




2d do. 


18 


18 


«« 


Munn, David, . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


(« 


McKenzie, James W., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


(< 


Stiles, John A., 


- 


2d do. 


22 


22 


«< 


Sampson, Fred, 


- 


2d do. 


21 


18 


<< 


St. John, Jules, 


- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


<« 


Witt, Hugo, 


- 


2d do. 


19, 


19 


<< 


Willey, George H., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 


19 


« 


Wing, John F., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 


19 


«( 


Perrault, Albert, 


- ' 


2d do. 


19, 


18 


<< 


Connery, Thomas F., 


- 


3d do. 


16 


18 


a 


Cleveland, Arthur B., 


— 


2d do. 







Sharpshooters, . . . .18 
First class marksmen, . . 5 
Second class marksmen, . . 33 



Third class marksman, 
Unqualified member, 
Total, . 



1 

1 

— 58 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



115 







COMPANY E, SECOND INFANTRY. 










Service in U- S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Captain, 


Gray, Edwin R., 


_ 


S. S., 


46, 47, 42 


1st Sergeant, 


Doane, Harrv L., 


2d Mass., E, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


Sergeant, - 


Hall, Frank P., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 46 


<< 


Karlson, Augustus, . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 47, 43 


«< 


Smith, James D., 


2d Mass., E, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


<< 


Baker, Fred I., 


- 


D. M., 


45, 49, 42 


Corporal, . 


Anderson, Robert H., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


<i 


Doucette, Modest A., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 46, 43 


Private, 


Hinds, Chester A, . 


- 


D. M., 


50, 49, 43 


tt 


Miglionico, Xavier J., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 44 


t< 


Willard, Leroy M., . 


2d Mass., E, 


s. s., 


45, 47, 42 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Davison, Eugene F., 


2d Mass., E, 


1st Class, 


44,45, - 


Corporal, . 


Cooley, Harry M., . 


- 


1st do. 


44, 44, - 


Private, 


Gleason, George L., . 


- 


1st do. 


44,46, - 


Lieutenant, 


Bosquet, Horace J., . 


2d Mass., E, 


2d do. 


19, 20 


Corporal, . 


Crane, William N., . 


- 


2d do. 


23 


, 18 


<( 


Barry, William, 


- 


2d do. 


18 


,20 


Musician, . 


Hartson, Lewis J., . 


-. 


2d do. 


20 


,21 


Private, 


Bosquet, Conrad C., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


22 






Brown, Ernest L., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


, 19 






Brown, Bert C, 


- 


2d do. 


19 


20 






Cooley, Bert W., 


- 


2d do. 


21 


, 19 






Daley, Michael F., . 


- 


2d do. 


24 


22 






Gates, Herbert L., . 


2d Mass., E, 


2d do. 


19 


, 19 






Gibbs, Star M., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


,19 






Gilmore, Wilfred C, 


- 


2d do. 


19 


,20 






GoulcJ, Benjamin A., 


2d Mass., E, 


2d do. 


19 


19 






Gould, George L., . 


2d Mass., E, 


2d do. 


19 


20 






Gwiimette, William E., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 






Hartson, William A., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


20 






Hartney, Charles F., 


- 


2d do. 


21 


19 






Hoehn, Harry S., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


22 






Karlson, Gustavus P., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


20 






Karlson, Jean, . 


- 


2d do. 


21 


22 






Kelly, Thomas F., . 


6th Mass., D, 


2d do. 


21 


21 






Lawrence, Walter A., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 






Moody, William G., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


20 






Norling, Axel, . 


- 


2d do. 


22 


21 






Peasley, Millage J., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 






Smith, William L., . 


2d Mass., E, 


2d do. 


20 


18 






Swift, Richard L., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 






Terrien Fred A.. 


- 


2d do. 


20 


18 






Warner, Harry E., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


20 






White, Edward J., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 






Wright, Charles 0., . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


20 






Gould, Herbert W., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


17 






Kellogg, Fred H., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 


15 






Moody, Leroy F., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


18 


Corporal, . 


Spring, Elmer A., . 


2d Mass., E, 


3d do. 


15 


18 


Private, 


Varno, Charles, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 


17 


Lieutenant, 


Weymouth, Fred S., 


- 


1st do. 


- 


Private, 


Bacon, Myron L., . 


- 


3d do. 


- 


M 


Bloomstrand, Frank E., . 


- 


3d do. 


_ 


M 


Sibley, Charles T 4 , . 


— 


3d do. 


— 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 2 

Sharpshooters, .... 9 

First class marksmen, . . 4 

Second class marksmen, . . 31 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



8 
4 

— 58 



116 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY F, SECOND INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 








Eank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Sergeant, . 


Marshall, William H., . 




1st Class, 


45,47, - 


Corporal, . 


Annis, "Walter M., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


Private, 


Cronin, John, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


19 


<< 


Cushman, William S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


Sergeant, . 


Fish, Orlando S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


Private, 


Fielding, Gordon G., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


18 


Lieutenant, 


Henry, Wellington K., . 


-. 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


Private, 


King," James 0., 


- 


2d 


do. 


24 


22 


Captain, 


Nicholson, John, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


21 


Private, 


Ogden, Levi P., 


'- 


2d 


do. 


20 


18 


<< 


Read, Edward L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


21 


Sergeant, . 


Ward, Herbert P., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


19 


Private, 


Warren, Walter E.,. 


- 


2d 


do. 


22 


21 


<< 


Wheeler, Ralph D., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


18 


Lieutenant, 


Willard, Robert K.,. 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


20 


Private, 


Allen, George, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


20 


16 


a 


Bennett, Frank A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


a 


Blackburn, Samuel, 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


,15 


a 


Blake, Edward C, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


15 


a 


Dowling, Thomas W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18 


15 


it 


Forgea, Gilbert M., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


" '. '. 


Fuller, Fred W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


17 


Bugler, 


Fitzgerald, John A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


16 


Corporal, . 


Haiger, Linus W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


15 


Sergeant, . 


Parker, Lyle B., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


Corporal, . 


Shea, James R., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


17 


Private, 


Steavens, James H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


n 


Willis, Warren L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


21 


16 


Corporal, . 


Walters, John W., . 


— 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 



First class marksman, . . 1 
Second class marksmen, . . 14 
Third class marksmen, . . 14 



Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



34 



63 



COMPANY G-, SECOND INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 

Private, 

Corporal, . 

Sergeant, . 

Captain, 

Lieutenant, 

Private, 

Sergeant, . 

Private, 

Bugler, 

Q. M. Sergeant, 

Corporal, . 

Private, 

<< 

Corporal, . 

Sergeant, . 
Private, 

Corporal, . 

1st Sergeant, 
Private, 



Butement, William, . 
Coogan, Thomas J., 
Ferrier, William, 
Gardella, Nataline, . 
Hayes, William C , . 
Ley den, Edward J., 
Robinson, Ernest E., 
Austin, Timothy T., 
Bascom, Eddie C, . 
Cargill, Robert D., . 
Conrad, Henry T., . 
Easton, George E., . 
Ford, Michael H., . 
Hamilton, Myron L., 
Hayes, Patrick J., . 
Marble, Ernest P., . 
Mayforth, William M., 
Reardon, Walter J., 
Schelb, Justus A., . 
Scully, Jeremiah F., 
Anderson, James, . 
Bristol, Saylord L., . 
Cartmill, Robert J., . 



2d Mass., G, 

2d Mass., G, 
2d Mass., G, 
2d Mass., G, 
2d Mass., G, 
2d Mass., G, 
2d Mass., G, 

2d Mass., G, 
2d Mass., G, 
2d Mass., G, 



2d Mass., G, 
2d Mass., G, 

2d Mass., K, 

2d Mass., G, 



s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



47, 48, 43 
46, 46, 43 

46, 46, 44 

48, 46, 45 
44, 50, 45 
44, 46, 45 

47, 48, 43 

42, 42, - 

42.42, - 

43.47, - 

43, 43, - 

42.48, - 
42, 42, - 
42, 42, - 

43.43, - 

44, 42, - 
42, 44, - 
42, 42, - 

42.42, - 

43.43, - 
18, 18 

18, 18 

19, 18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



117 



COMPANY G, SECOND INFANTRY -Concluded. 







Service in U. 8. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


. Cavanaugh, John, . 




2d Class, 


18, 19 




. Coleman, Richard F., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 




. Cope, Frederick "W., 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 




. Corkery, Michael A., 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 




. Costello, Patrick F., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 




. Daniels, Charles S., . 


- 


2d do. 


21, 18 




. Fraser, John M., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 




. Gonin, Rolenzo F., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 




. Hargadon, Thomas F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 




. Hickey, Edward M., 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


u 


. Kelliher, Mark J., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(< 


. King, Clarence W., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


(< 


. La Marsh, Edward F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


a 


. Lynch, Patrick J., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, 


. Mahoney, John J., Jr., . 


2d Mass., G, 


2d do. 


19,21 


Private, 


. Markham, George H., 


2d Mass., G, 


2d do. 


20, 19 


Sergeant, 


. McCarthy, Dennis F., 


2d Mass., G, 


2d do. 


19, 18 


Private, 


. McGlinchy, David S., 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


«t 


. Mead, Ralph L., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


<( 


. Norton, John F., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, 


. O'Brien, James J., . 


2d Mass., G, 


2d do. 


18, 20 


Private, 


. Otis, Louis R., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


(< 


. Pomeroy, Artemus B., . 


- 


2d do. 


20,18 


<( 


. Rickson, Orcar J., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


t< 


. Roberts, Ernest S., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<« 


. Shea, James W., 


- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


n 


. Shea, John P., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


a 


. Shea, William J., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«« 


. Stagnaro, Frank W., 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


M 


. Bressette, Alphonso, 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


<( 


. Buchan, Robert A., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


i< 


. Fitzgerald, John J., 


m 


3d do. 


17, 16 


«< 


. Goggins, Henry S., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


<< 


. Gore, Daniel W., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 15 


(< 


. Keane, Daniel J., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


X 


. May, Frederick G., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


«( 


. Miller, Jesse F., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


(( 


. Shea, James H., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


4C 


. Smith, Henry W., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,16 


<< 


. Sullivan, Edward P., 


— 


3d do. 


16, 17 


Sharpsl 


looters, .... 7 


Third class mark 


jmen, 


. 11 


First el 


ass marksmen, . . 13 


Total, . 


, . 


. —63 


Second 


class marksmen, . . 32 










COMPANY H, SECOND INFANT] 


*Y. 




Corporal, 


. Bottomly, Jesse F., . 


_ 


S. S., 


48, 46, 42 


Private, 


. Boyd, Harry S., 


- 


S. s., 


47, 47, 43 


1st Sergeam 


t, . Gray, Harry T., 


2d Mass., H, 


s. s., 


48, 47, 43 


Sergeant, 


. Hooker, Arthur R., . 


- 


s. s , 


48, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


. Jordan, Fred B., 


2d Mass., H, 


s. s., 


48, 49, 45 


Sergeant, 


. Rathbun, Willson H., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 49, 42 


Lieutenant, 


. Smith, Clarence E., . 


2d Mass., H, 


s. s., 


46, 47, 43 


Sergeant, 


. Smith, Thomas W., . 


- 


s. s., 


48, 47, 43 


Captain, 


. Young, Harry C, 


2d Mass., H, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


Q. M. Serg( 


jant, . Burr, George E., 


- 


1st Class, 


46, 42, - 


Private, 


. Goodwin, Aleck R., . 


- 


1st do. 


45, 42, - 


Corporal, 


. Hardy, Charles K., Jr., . 




1st do. 


47,42, - 



118 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY H, SECOND INFANTRY- Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 










Volunteers, 




Scores. 


Rank. 


Name. 


1898. 
Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


1901. 


Private, 


Parker, Charles F., Jr., . 




1st Class, 


42,42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Potter, Clarence F., . 


IstN. H., G, 


1st do. 


47,44, - 


Private, 


Allen, John D., 


2d Mass., H, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Brand, Alexander, . 


_ 


2d do. 


22,23 


<< 


Brown, William, 


_ 


2d do. 


22, 22 


«< 


Bugbee, George W., 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 19 


<« 


Buck, Ernest E., 


.- 


2d do. 


21,21 


Corporal, . 


Chambers, George F., 


- 


2d do. 


21,23 


Private, 


Cypher, Harry L., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Derrick, William W., 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Dorman, George F., 


_ 


2d do. 


20,22 


<( 


Duguette, John P., . 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 


<< 


Goodwin, William N., 


- 


2d do. 


19,23 


(< 


Germain, Isaac, 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Musician, . 


Hamel, George S., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


Private, 


Isenberg, David B., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Johnson, Iver N., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 19 


a 


Joslin, Arthur B., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


it 


Julien, Robert P., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,22 


Corporal, . 


Margerum, Fred L., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Mason, Lewis W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 ' 


<< 


Mellor, Edward H., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«« 


Morse, Edmund F., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 18 


« 


Norton, Edwin F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


<« 


Overend, Harry P., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18,18 


<« 


Percy, William F., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 19 


<« 


Quigley, Frederick A., . 


- 


2d do. 


21,22 


Corporal, . 


Rogers, Frank J., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Schiller, Frank A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Searles, Harry F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


it 


Sears, Alfred F., 


■ _ 


2d do. 


22,22 


Corporal, . 


Thompson, Clarence W., 


2d Mass., H, 


2d do. 


22,22 


Private, 


Uppstrom, Harold F., 


- 


2d do. 


22,23 


«< 


Wray, Frank W., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


(< 


Becker, George, 


_ 


3d do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Bennett, Charles F., 


_ 


3d do. 


16,17 


<( 


Bliss, Raymond, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


«( 


Burnette, Basil W., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Colbrook, Charles W., . 


- 


3d do. 


16,17 


<< 


Gleason, Elmer F., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


it 


Hunter, Alexander M., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,17 


a 


Jenkins, Lewis L., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


a 


Mclntyre, Harry H., 


- • 


3d do. 


15,15 


it 


Parker, Alfred T., . 


- 


3d do. 


16,17 


it 


Partridge, Fred C, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


it 


Peterson Edwin R., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


it 


Rosenblad, John E., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


tt 


Thayer, Clifton M., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


a 


West, William A., . 


— 


3d do. 


15,16 


Sharpshooters 


9 


Third class marks 


men, 


. 15 


First class ma 


rksmen, . . 5 


Total, . 


. 


. —61 


Second class n 


larksmen, . . 32 








COMPANY I, SECOND INFANTRY. 


Captain, 


Gilfillan, James R., . 


2d Mass., I, 


S. S., 


44, 46, 42 


Lieutenant, 


French, Chester W., 


2d Mass., I, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


a 


Beckman, Albert G., 


2d Mass., I, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— E"o. 7. 



119 



COMPANY I, SECOND INFANTRY -Concluded. 







Service in TJ. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


1st Sergeant, 


Remillard, Arthur H., 


2d Mass., I, 


S. S., 


46, 48, 43 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Thayer, William, 


- 


S. S., 


44, 46, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Andrus, Charles E., 


- 


S. S., 


44, 46, 42 


«( 


Hinds, Frank L., 


- 


S. S., 


44, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


O'Brien, William C, 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


<« 


Gallivan, Thomas W., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


(< 


Gallivan, James H., 


2d Mass., I, 


s. s, 


45, 46, 42 


Musician, . 


Harper, Frederick, . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


Private, 


Bissaillon, Eugene, . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


<< 


Danahey, John J., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 47, 42 


a 


Day, Samuel C, 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


a 


Emery, Fred L., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


a 


Gerhard, Emil, 


- 


S.S., 


45, 47, 42 


<< 


Harris, Sumner A., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 47, 43 


it 


Lafreniere, William A., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


<( 


Sackett, William R., 


- 


s. s., 


48, 48, 43 


a 


Willard, Frank 0., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Dragon, Ernest F., . 


2d Mass., I, 


1st Class, 


44,42, - 


Corporal, . 


Slattery, James J., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


Private, 


Bayon, Fred., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


(i 


Burke, John L., 


2d Mass., I, 


1st do. 


43,43, - 


<< 


Lord, Elmer B., 


- 


1st do. 


42, 42. - 


Sergeant, . 


Whitton, William W., . 


2d Mass., I, 


2d do. 


20,20 


Corporal, . 


Morin, Frank X., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(« 


O'Shea, Daniel J., . 


2d Mass., I, 


2d do. 


19,18 


<< 


Thornton, James H., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Private, 


Bardwell, Frank S., 


_ 


2d do. 


18,18 




> 


Cox, Arthur B., 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 




< 


Lafreniere, William E., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,21 




t 


Loughlin, Patrick F., 


• 


2d do. 


19, 18 




( 


Mongeon, Albert J., 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 




i 


Oberempt, Alfred S., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 




« 


Pellissier, William, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 




• 


Root, Sidney R., 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 




a 


Smith, Oscar H., 


- 


2d do. 


19,21 




< 


Taber, Harry E., 


- 


2d do. 


22, 19 




< 


Torrey, Andrew S., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 




< 


Ballieul, Frederick A., . 


- 


3d do. 


17, 15 




t 


Collins, Herbert F., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 




i 


Fleming, Arthur J., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 




it 


Gillispie, Robert S M 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 




i< 


Hodgkins, Frank 0., 


- 


3d do. 


15,15 




< 


Mahoney, Thomas F., 


- 


3d do. 


15,15 




c 


Meehan, Timothy J., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 15 




t 


Bottumly, Edward H., . 


- 


2d do. 


- 




< 


Clark, John J., 


- 


3d do. 


- 




< 


Curran, William M., 


- 


3d do. 


_ 




< 


Sheridan, William J., 


- 


3d do. 


- 


<« 


Tobin, James R., 


~ 


3d do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, . . . .20 
First class marksmen, . . 5 
Second class marksmen, . . 16 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



11 
3 
— 55 



COMPANY K, SECOND INFANTRY. 



Private, 

Q. M. Sergeant, . 

Sergeant, . 



Dickinson, Chester H., 
Fisher, Harry D., . 
McKinney, Clement, 



2d Mass., K, 



S. S., 
o. S., 

s. s., 



45, 46, 42 

45, 46, 43 

46, 46, 42 



120 ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 



COMPANY K, SECOND INFANTRY- Concluded. 









Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Lieutenant, 


Sabin, Winfred A., . 


Lehigh, 


S. S., 


45, 47, 42 


<< 


Turner, David A., . 


2d Mass., K, 


S. S.; 


46, 46, 42 


Private, 


Alberty, Ernest H., . 


- 


1st Class, 


42, 42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Beebee, Frederick G., 


- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


Private, 


Decatur, John H., Jr., 


- 


1st do. 


42, 43, - 


Sergeant, . 


Grant, Lewis C, 


- 


1st do. 


42,43, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Madison, Burdett R., 


2d Mass., K, 


1st do. 


42,43, - 


Sergeant, . 


Nesbitt, Samuel W., 


2d Mass., K, 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Corporal, . 


Riopell, Julius F., . 


- 


1st do. 


45,44, - 


Private, 


"Warner, Wilber C, . 


- 


1st do. 


43,42, - 


" . . 


Brouillard, Charles F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


" . . 


Chamberlain, Arthur L., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


** . . 


Conlin, Augustus, . 


- 


2d do. 


21 


,20 


"■ • • 


Cummings, James D., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


" . . 


Denton, Daniel D., . 


- 


2d do. 


22 


,20 


" . . 


Denway, Lewis G., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


, 18 


Corporal, . 


Dunn, John F., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


Private, 


Geiger, George W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


» 19 


Corporal, . 


Howes, Foster M., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


,20 


Private, 


Ludwig, William J., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


Corporal, . 


McLeod, Fred L., . 


- 


2d do. 


21 


21 


Private, 


McLeod, Charles E., - . 


2d Mass., K, 


2d do. 


18 


,18 


** # # 


Muir, Robert W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


** . . 


Newell, William H., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


,19 


' i « • 


Petti bone, Alfred S., 


- 


2d do. 


22 


,18 


" . . 


Rowe, Fred. P., 


- 


2d do. 


21 


,20 


*' • • 


Shattuck, Jesse B., . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


, 18 


" . . 


Spencer, Charles S., . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


,23 


" . . 


Thayer, George B., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


21 


Musician, . 


Yassley, George A., . 


- 


2d do. 


21 


20 


Private, 


Barr, Harry G., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


Corporal, . 


Bartlett, Leroy E., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


Private, 


Berry, Carroll B., 


- 


3d do. 


17 


16 


" # # 


Brooks, George F., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


* ( . . 


Buchanan, George H., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


** # m 


Clark, John J., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 


** m # 


Coneroy, Bernard, . 


- 


3d do. 


17 


15 


** , i 


Hubbard, Frank D., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


** m # 


Johnson, Martin J., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 


4< • • 


Lamont, Harry A., . 


- - 


3d do. 


17 


15 




Matthews, Albert N., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


44 . . 


Mclntyre, George A., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 


** . . 


Mclntyre, John, 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


* * # # 


Merrill, Leslie P., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 




Scott, Herbert E., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


** m 9 


McNeil, John A., 


- 


3d do. 


19 


17 


* c # # 


Terry, Harmon A., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


Captain, 


Jenks, Fred A., 


2d Mass., K, 


S. S., 


— 


Sharpshooters 


, .... 6 


Third class mark; 


smen, 


. 17 


First class ma 


rksmen, . . 8 


Total, . 


. 


. —51 


Second class e 


aarksmen, . . 20 








COMPANY L, SECOND INFANTRY. 


1st Sergeant, 


Porter, Herbert S., . 


_ 


D. M., 


46, 46, 43 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Stearns, Henry J., . 


- 


S. S., 


44, 47, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Luzarder, William E., 


- 


S.S., 


44, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


Corless, William E., 




1st Class, 


47,46 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



121 



COMPANY L, SECOND INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service In TJ. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Graves, Elwin A., . 




1st Class, 


44,43 


Lieutenant, 


Class, Edward J., . 


2d Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


22, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Sears, David F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


Corporal, 


, . 


Bitzer, Gottleib, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


<< 


, . 


Clifford, Jesse A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<t 


, . 


Thayer, Sereno W., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


. . 


Adams, George B., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


«< 


, , 


Andrews, Arthur J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,19 


<( 


, 


Barr, Robert F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


(< 


, . 


Bundy, Edward F., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


<( 


. , 


Carney, John H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


u 


, . 


Day, John A., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


<( 


, . 


Dean, Ernest A., 


> - 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


it 


, . 


Donahue, Fred G., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


<( 


, . 


Ellis, Louie F., 


— 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


<( 


, . 


Fizzett, Ernest, 


— 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(( 


, . 


Le Barron, George I., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


, . 


Stearns, Charles H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


a 


, . 


Saxton, Walter J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


<« 


, . 


Suhl, Ernest K., 


— 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


Corporal, 


, . 


McGowan, James H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


Private, 


. 


Abbe, John F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,17 


(< 


, . 


Bachelder, Floyd W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


20, 16 


«< 


# 


Brassard, Arthur C, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(< 


, # 


Betters, William H., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


- << 


. 


Campbell, Angus S., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<(' 


, 


Galvin, William D., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


« 


. 


Parker, Fred W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 18 


(< 


. 


Seiler, Charles F., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16,18 


(« 


. 


York, Frederick A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


(< 


. 


Williams, Edward A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


Lieutenant, 


, 


Mason, Fayette B., . 


2d Mass., L, 


S. S 


■ ? 


- 


Sergeant, 


. 


Kelly, Herbert N., . 


- 


1st Class, 


- 


<< 


. 


Bean, Robert E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


_ 


Corpora], . 


. 


Ashley, Harry W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


i( 


, 


Herrick, Arlie W., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


- 


Private, 


. 


Luippold, Louis, 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


<( 


. 


Luippold, William, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


«< 


. 


Smith, Frank A., 


2d Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


- 


<< 


. 


Thorniley, John A., 


- 


1st 


do. 


- 


(< 


• 


Vladish, Frank, 


- 


2d 


do. 


— 


Distinguished marksman, . . 1 


Third class marksmen 


• 


. 14 


Sharpshooters, .... 3 


Unqualified members, 


. 


. 14 


First class marksmen, . . 5 


Total, . 




. —59 


Second class marksmen, . . 22 








COMPANY M, SECOND INFANTRY. 


Private, 


Cadigan, James C, . 


2d Mass., M, 


D. M„ 


49, 48, 46 


Corporal, . 


. 


Bowe, George H., . 


- 


S. S 


9 


48, 46, 43 


Captain, 


. 


Campbell, James A., 


2d Mass., M, 


s. s 


9 


46, 46, 44 


Private, 


. 


Carr, George E.. 


- 


s. s 


•9 


44, 48, 46 


(< 


. 


Crabtree, John T., . 


_ 


s. s 


9 


48, 47, 42 


Lieutenant, 


. 


Cliffe, Sydney H., . 


2d Mass., M, 


s. s 


9 


49, 47, 43 


Sergeant, . 


. 


Dunn, Charles E., . 


2d Mass., M, 


s. s 


9 


46, 47, 42 


Private, 


. 


Gravel, Edward, 


- 


s. s 




45, 46, 43 


<< 


. 


Hamel, Charles, Jr., 


— 


s. s 




49, 46, 44 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Hodecker, William, . 


2d Mass., M, 


s. s 


> 


46, 48, 42 



122 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY M, SECOND INFANTRY- Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Corporal, . 


Irving, Floyd G., 




S. S., 


46, 46, 42 


Sergeant, . 


King, Victor, . 


2d Mass., M, 


S. S., 


46, 47, 43 


Private, 


Love, Albert, . 


- 


S. S., 


44, 46, 42 


<( 


Mercier, Joseph J., . 


- 


S. S., 


44, 46, 45 


<< 


Mercier, Middy, 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


Musician, . 


Moran, John W., 


- 


o. o., 


46, 46, 43 


Private, 


Murphy, George F., 


- 


s. s., 


50, 46, 42 


Lieutenant, 


O'BrieD, William, . 


2d Mass., M, 


s. s, 


46, 46, 42 


Private, 


O'Neil, Frank, . 


_ 


s. s., 


47, 47, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Paradise, Walla, 


2d Mass., M, 


s. s., 


46, 48, 45 


Private, 


Paro, Daniel, Jr., 


_ 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


<( 


Schaffer, Henry G., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


«« 


Thompson, Charles W., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


Weir, John, 


2d Mass., M, 


s. s., 


45, 48, 44 


Private, 


Wooley, Thomas, . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


Austin, Arthur A., . 


2d Mass., M, 


1st Class, 


43,42 


Private, 


Barthe, Robert, 


_ 


1st do. 


42 


46 


a 


Brunnell, Joseph H., 


_ 


1st do. 


43 


42 


a 


Card, Herbert N., . 


_ 


1st do. 


43, 


43 


<( 


Carpenter, Anson C, 


_ 


1st do. 


44 


42 


a 


Crandall, George T., 


_ 


1st do. 


42 


43 


Corporal, . 


Crosier, Guy, . 


- 


1st do. 


43 


44 


«( 


Grant, George, Jr., . 


_ 


1st do. 


45 


42 


Private, 


Johnson, Fred. E., . 


_ 


1st do. 


46 


44 


<< 


McGlynn, John L., . 


- 


1st do. 


48 


43 


(< 


Nimmons, John L., . 


_ 


1st do. 


42 


42 


a 


Partridge, Harry A., 


2d Mass., M, 


1st do. 


43 


42 


Sergeant, . 


Reardon, John T., . 


2d Mass., M, 


1st do. 


45, 


42 


Private, 


Tatro, Augustus A., 


_ 


1st do. 


44 


42 


(< 


Tattersall, Eli, . 


_ 


1st do. 


43 


42 


<< 


Avey, George H., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


«( 


Barrett, Thomas R., 


_ 


2d do. 


19 


20 


n 


Bates, Charles F., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18 


18 


X 


Brassard, Eugene E., 


_ 


2d do. 


19 


18 


(( 


Carroll, William C, 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


<( 


Chase, William E., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18 


19 


a 


Daniels, Charles, 


_ 


2d do. 


19 


20 


<< 


Hersom, George N., 


_ 


2d do. 


22 


23 


(( 


Hutton, James D., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


21 


a 


Kaiser, Robert C, ... 


_ 


2d do. 


21 


21 


(< 


La Port, Fred A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


<< 


Lozo, John, 


_ 


2d do. 


19 


20 


(( 


Morris, Henry, 


- 


2d do. 


23 


23 


(< 


O'Grady, William, . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


Corporal, . 


Ormsbee, George E., 


- 


2d do. 


21 


19 


Private, 


Raithel, John T., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18 


20 


a 


Robinson, Clinton, . 


_ 


2d do. 


19 


19 


<< 


Roberts, Moses A., . 


- 


2d do. 


21 


23 


c< 


Savage, Martin J., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


«< 


Sero, Andrew M., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


(( 


Stafford, William L., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


18 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 
Sharpshooters, . . . .24 
First class marksmen, . . 15 



Second class marksmen, . . 21 
Unqualified members, . . 2 
Total, —63 



FIELD AND STAFF, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Chaplain, . 


Beals, Charles E., . 




S. S., 


44, 47, 44 


Lieutenant, 


Gow, Charles R., 


5th Mass., H, 
M and B, 
Hdqrs. 


S. S., 


45, 46, 43 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



123 



FIELD AND STAFF, FIFTH INFANTRY - Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Kegt. and Co. 








Color Sergeant, . 


Gustafson, Adolphus G., 


5th Mass., B, 


S. S 


•> 


44, .49, 49 


Lieutenant, 


Worcester, Rupert D., 


5th Mass., B, 


s. s 


•» 


44, 47, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Brackett, George S., 


5th Mass., I, 


2d Class, 


19, 18 


Major, 


Butler, WilJard C, . 


5th Mass., D, 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


Lieutenant, 


Chamberlain, Fred C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Comerais, Harry D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


Major, 


Galloupe, Charles W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


Lieutenant, 


Kincaide, Henry L., 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


Sergeant, . 


Splaine, George W., 


5th Mass . , 

Hdqrs. 
5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


Major, 


Stover, Willis W., . 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


P. M. Sergeant, . 


Wade, William W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Wardwell, George A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,23 


Lieutenant, 


Warren, Henry D., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


Captain, 


Wyer, Arthur C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Lieutenant, 


Deering, Henry L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


Drum Major, 


Downing, Frank W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


Captain, 


Dukelow, Charles T., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Knapp, Charles W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


Colonel, 


Oakes, William H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


Lieut. Colonel, . 


Clement, Murray D., 


5th Mass., 
Hdqrs. 


S. S 


•> 


— 


Color Sergeant, . 


Cooke, Walter W., . 


5th Mass., F, 


D. M., 


- 


Orderly, 


Flanders, Ernest F., 


5th Mass., A, 


3d Class, 


- 


Com. Sergeant, . 


Jenkins, Morton E., 


5th Mass., A, 


1st 


do. 


- 


Major, 


Morrison, Walter E., 


5th Mass., 
Hdqrs. 


2d 


do. 


- 


Sergeant Major, . 


Phillips, William S., 


— 


S. S 


•> 


~ 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters, .... 6 

First class marksman, . . 1 

Second class marksmen, . . 13 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



30 



COMPANY A, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Snow, Alfred H., . 


5th Mass , A, 


S. S., 


44, 46, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Walker, Frederick A., 


5th Mass., A, 


1st Class, 


44,42 


Captain, 


Smith, Mark E., 


5th Mass.. A, 


2d 


do. 


18. 18 


Lieutenant, ■ 


Wilson, William H., 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


Sergeant, . 


Lerned, Albert A., . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<« 


Coleman, Augustus P., . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


19,22 


(< 


Grant, Benjamin B., 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


22,21 


Corporal, . 


Lindquist, Charles A., 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Quinn, James A., 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


u 


Adams, Daniel F., . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


(( 


Woodworth, Arthur B., . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


20,18 


Private, 


Bartoll, Henry D., . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Crocker, Frank B., . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


a 


Hall, Andrew F., 


Boatswain, 
Brooklyn 
Navy Yard. 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


a 


Hammond, Adna B., 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


<( 


Higgins, George E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,19 


a 


Howard, Richard F., 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


it 


Irving, Frederick, . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


McCaughan, Alexander, . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


<< 


Skehan, William C, 


U. S. Stmr. 
Baltimore. 


2d 


do. 


23,21 


(< 


Thompson, Everett E., . 


5th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


tt 


Tilden, Frank J., . 


— 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 



124 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY A, FIFTH INFANTRY -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Weir, James D., 




2d Class, 


20,18 


t< 


Wilkins, Alfred A., . 


5th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


21,20 


1st Sergeant, 


Morse, Edward C, . 


5th Mass , A, 


3d 


do. 


18, 17 


Corporal, . 


Donnell, Benjamin N., 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


t< 


Holmstrom, Louis M., 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<« 


Tabor, Charles S., . 


8th Mass.,' M, 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


Musician, . 


Dodge, Arthur W., . 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


17, 19 


Private, 


Bloom, Henry A., . 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


18, 17 


<« 


Brown, Joseph, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,15 


<( 


Chaffin, Arthur G., . 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


(< 


Coleman, Charles W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(« 


Davis, James A., 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


u 


Donnell, Arthur C, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


(( 


Dowdell, Millard F., 


8th Mass., M, 


3d 


do. 


19, 15 


<« 


Fuller j George L., . 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


19, 17 


l< 


Gordon, Charles P., 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Harrington, Frank M., . 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


(« 


Hoffman, Charles P., 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(< 


Ingalls, Walter E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


(( 


Kilroy, John P., 


5th Mass., H, 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


<( 


Maddocks, Charles R., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


(( 


Masters, Earie W., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


u 


McFarland, Alfred W., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


<( 


McFarland, Ephraim A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<( 


McLellan, Daniel, . 


5th Mass , A, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Nissem Frederick W., 


5th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(« 


Orne, Ralph H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 17 


«( 


Quinn, William A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18,17 


«« 


Smith, Charles W. H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Smith, William G., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


«< 


Taylor, Charles R., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


Lieutenant, 


Bray, Rowland W., . 


5th Mass., A, 


1st 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Carling, Charles F., 


5th Mass., C, 


1st 


do. 


- 


<< 


Magoun, Walter H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


— 



Sharpshooter, .... 1 
First class markmen, . . 3 
Second class marksmen, . . 22 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



30 

7 
— 63 



COMPANY B, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 


F'acey, Charles W., . 


5th Mass., B, 


D. M., 


46, 49, 47 


<< 


McNamara, Patrick J., . 


5th Mass., B, 


S. S 




45, 47, 44 


Private, 


Rogers, Charles W , 


5th Mass., B, 


s. s 




47, 46, 47 


Sergeant, . 


Ward, William J , . 


5th Mass., B, 


s. s 




46, 46, 45 


Corporal, . 


Brown, Roland E., . 


- 


1st Class, 


42, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Hales, William H., . 


5th Mass., B, 


1st 


do. 


44,46 


<< 


Jenness, Herbert T., 


5th Mass., B, 


1st 


do. 


43, 45 


<< 


Jones, George T., . 


5th Mass., B, 


1st 


do. 


43,43 


<< 


Mullett, George F., . 


5th Mass., B, 


1st 


do. 


47,42 


Private, 


Rouse, John P., 


5th Mass., B, 


1st 


do. 


43,45 


<t 


Arnold, Charles B., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


<< 


Arnold, Israel, . 


5th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


<« 


Bolster, Richard N., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


«< 


Collins, Joseph H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Davis, Osgood, . 


5th Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


Private, 


Dougan, Harry J., •. 


5th Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18,25 


«< 


Dougan, James E , . 


8th U. S. Cav., 
K, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — ISTo. 7. 



125 



COMPANY B, FIFTH INFANTRY— Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Kegt. and Co. 








Private, 


Dunn, Arthur A., 


_ 


2d Class, 


18, 18 


«< 


Earle, John J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


Corporal, . 


Haskins, Waldo F., . 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


19,19 


Private, 


Higgins, Aldelbert A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 20 


a 


Hill, George A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


Corporal, . 


Johnston, Frank E., 


5th Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Lutz, Frank, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


it 


Mitchell, Fred P., . 


5th Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


a 


Seigfreidt, Ernest W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


(< 


Sullivan, James H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,18 


Corporal, . 


Tupper, William H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Bolster, Warren N., 


- 


3d 


do. 


19, 15 


i< 


Brown, Chester P., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


a 


Connell, William E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


<< 


Crowley, Cornelius J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


« 


Cutler, Myron L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 18 


<< 


Dennison, Wiliiam E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


(« 


Donovan, John A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


(< 


Dunn, John M., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 16 


t< 


Galvin, Daniel F., . 


5th Mass., B, 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(< 


Grant, Edward, 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 16 


u 


Kelley, Edward F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


Corporal, . 


Keough, James, 


5th Mass., B, 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


Private, 


McCarthy, Edward, 


5th Mass., B, 


3d 


do. 


18,16 


<< 


McPtaee, John A., . 


.- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


• a 


McPhee, Stephen D., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(i 


Murphy, Owen D., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


(< 


Olmstead, Fred L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(« 


Tirrell, Owen E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


(< 


Eadie, G. Atberton, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


_ 


u 


Gillies, Robert L., . 


5th Mass., B, 


3d 


do. 


_ 


Sergeant, . 


McLeod, Ronald A., 


5th Mass., B, 


S. £ 


•» 


- 


Captain, 


Mason, Edward E., . 


- 


S. S 


•» 


- 


Musician, . 


Paquette, Ranall A., 


5th Mass., B, 


3d Class, 


- 


Corporal, . 


Ring, Richard D., . 


5th Mass., B, 


3d 


do. 


— 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters, .... 5 

First class marksmen, . . 6 

Second class marksmen, . . 18 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



22 
11 
— 63 



COMPANY C, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 

Corporal, . 
Lieutenant, 

Sergeant, . 

Corporal, . 

Musician, . 
Private, 

Li 

Lieutenant, 
1st Sergeant, 
Sergeant, 



Corporal, 



Springer, Ernest R., 
Love, William W., . 
Wye, Thomas E., . 
Higbee, James A., . 
Mosses, Henry F., . 
English, Bernard, . 
Gould, Melvin W., Jr., 
Jones, Charles C, . 
Guilford, George F., 
Golden, David E., . 
Ryan, John T., 
Valentine, William, . 
Coulter, George S., . 
Metcalf, Frederick H., 
Hopkinson, James W., 
Cooney, James J., . 



5th Mass., C, 

5th Mass., C, 
5th Mass., C, 

5th Mass., C, 



5th Mass., C, 
5th Mass., C, 
5th Mass., C, 
5th Mass., C, 



S. S 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



44, 48, 42 
44, 46, 42 

44.42, - 

47.43, - 
45,46, - 
42, 45, - 
48, 44, - 
42, 44, - 

20, 18 

19, 19 
22, 20 
19,19 
21,20 

21, 18 

20, 19 

21, 21 



126 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY C, FIFTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service In U. S. 








Bank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Corporal, . 


Bill, Henry Weir, . 




2d Class, 


24,21 


<< 


Kelly John F 


5th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


Private, 


Boyce, Alexander, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


«< 


Britton, J. Walter, . 


2d Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


(< 


Brown, William, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


«< 


Coburn, Almon G., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


a 


Cooney, John P., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


«< 


Cushing, John F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


(< 


Farrell, Christopher J., . 


5th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


a 


Fitzgerald, Thomas J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


« 


Kerens, James A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


<< 


Leahy James J., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<< 


MacDougal, John, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22, 18 


«( 


McAdams, William J., . 


5th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


21, 18 


<< 


Murphy, William Joseph, 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


<( 


O'Hara, William, . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


(( 


Regan, Thomas John, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<( 


Newcomb, Fred., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


(< 


Ward, John C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<( 


Abraham, Bernard S., < 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


(i 


Greenwood, Edward Al- 












bert, . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


17, 17 


<< 


Harrington, Frank A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


«« 


Langell, Walter E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(t 


Lynch, James J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


19, 17 


u 


Stover, Frank F., . 


- 


3d 


no. 


17, 17 


<< 


Williams, George Wallace, 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<« 


Forknall, E. Everett, 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


(« 


Spicer, George T., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


- 


Q.M. Sergeant, . 


Barrows, Frank A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Beaudoin, George W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


<( 


Bishop, George E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


(i 


McCabe, Frederick W., . 


5th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Sharpshooters 


!, . . . .2 


Third class mark 


smer 


» • 


. 8 


First class ma 


irksmen, . . 6 


Unqualified mem 


bers, 




. 9 


Second class i 


narksmen, . . 32 


Total, . 


• 


• 


. —57 


COMPANY D, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Sergeant, . 

Private, 

Captain, 

Lieutenant, 
<« 

1st Sergeant, 
Q. M. Sergeant, 
Sergeant, 



Corporal, 



Musician, 
Private, 



Van Amburgh, Charles J 
Simmons, Albert L., 
Lewis, Arthur E., . 
Nauman, Charles E., 
Sampson, Henry L., 
Caswell, Allen J., 
Trautewig, Adelbert F., 
Hunting, Martin J., 
Brown, Daniel G., . 
Badger, Leon D., 
Covell, William T., . 
Abbott, Harry B., . 
Raymond, George L., 
Nutter, Edwin F., . 
Berry, Aaron W., . 
Cushing, George B., 
Ghent, John J., 
Griffin, George E., . 



- 




5th Mass. 


D, 


5th Mass. 


,D, 


5th Mass. 


, L\ 


5th Mass. 


, r>, 


5th Mass. 


,D, 


5th Mass. 


,D\ 


5th Mass. 


,v, 


— 





s. s., 


1st Class, 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



45, 47, 45 
42,43 
18, 19 
18,20 
18, 18 
20,21 
18, 18 
18, 18 
18,19 
18,18 
21,21 
19,20 
19,20 
18, 18 
19,20 
19,20 
18, 18 
22,21 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



127 



COMPANY D, FIFTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


Olson, Olaf, . 


5th Mass., D, 


2d Class, 


19,20 


<< 


Smith, George, 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


<« 


Van Amburgh, Frank, . 


- 


2d do. 


19,19 


«« 


Waterman, Arthur H., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


<< 


Wood, Frank Thompson, 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Sampson, Ira L., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Ellis, Abner, . 


- 


3d do. 


15,15 


(< 


Kelliher, William, . 


5th Mass., D, 


3d do. 


15, 15 


Private, 


Badger, Fred M., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 


(< 


Cole, Louis A., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Found, William H., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Libby, Albert P., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,16 


a 


Little, Franklin M., 


- 


3d do. 


15,16 


u 


Pearson, Charles S., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Schiro, Henry J., 


- 


3d do. 


16,17 


« 


Robbins, Jesse T., . 


— 


2d do. 


— 



Sharpshooter, .... 1 
First class marksman, . . 1 
Second class marksmen, . . 22 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



10 

29 



■63 



COMPANY E, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Private, 


Cushing, George W., 


6th Mass., A, 


S. ? 


• > 


44, 46, 45 


Sergeant, . 


Haskell, Amos D., . 


- 


s. s 


•» 


46, 47, 43 


Private, 


Macdonald, Malcom C, . 


- 


s. s 


■> 


47, 47, 42 


1st Sergeant, 


Moore, George R., . 


5th Mass., E, 


s. s 


•» 


46, 47, 46 


Sergeant, . 


Perkins, John F., Jr., 


5th Mass., E, 


s. s 


•> 


46, 46, 44 


Private, 


Sargent, Dana E., . 


- 


s. s 


• > 


49, 47, 42 


<< 


Spillane, Thomas L., 


- 


s. s 


M 


44, 47, 43 


Corporal, . 


Austin, Otis S., 


- 


1st Class, 


42,44, - 


a 


Campbell, Franklin E:, . 


5th Mass., E, 


1st 


do. 


44, 44, - 


Captain, 


Clark, James C. D., 


5th Mass., E, 


1st 


do. 


46, 44, - 


Private, 


Chamberlain, William S., 


- 


1st 


do. 


43,43, - 


Lieutenant, 


Hall, Arthur S., 


6th Mass., A, 


1st 


do. 


45, 45, - 


Private, 


Magee, Robert M., . 


5th Mass.,E, 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Barry, Garrett E., . 


5th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


Private, 


Barker, James, 


- ■ 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


<< 


Bedell, Frank H , . 


5th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<« 


Bradbury, John T., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


Bugler, 


Chamberlain, Henry V., . 


5th Mass., 
N. C. S. 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


Private, 


Culley, Frank H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,23 


c< 


Day, Frank C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


<< 


Foster, Thomas L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


Corporal, . 


Greene, George W., . 


5th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


Private, 


Higgins, James P., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


(< < 


Johnson, Carl W., . 


5th Mass.,E, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


a 


Johnson, Louis, 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


it 


Knapp, Solomon V., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


<( 


Mclnnis, John A., . 


^ 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


<< 


Metcalf, William A., 




2d 


do. 


21,22 


(( 


Nichols, James T., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


(« 


Noveau, George W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


«( 


O'Neil, John F., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


Corporal, . 


Papkee, Gustave A., 


5th Mass.,E, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Peters, Robert W., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


(< 


Remick, Leonard D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


<< 


Rodgers, Thomas S., 


5th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


20,21 



128 ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



COMPANY E, FIFTH INFANTRY - Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Sheeley, Frank W., 




2d Class, 


20,20 


Corporal, . 


Simonds, Arthur D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 23 


Private, 


Spillane, Joseph, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


a 


Walker, Frank S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 2L 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Waterman, Frank 0., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Waterman, Frank R., 


5th Mass.; E, 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


Lieutenant, 


Whitney, Orville J., 


5th Mass.,E, 


2d 


do. 


22, 23 


Private, 


Baker, Edwin, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<( 


Bremer, George T., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Clifford, Frederick J., 


5th Mass., G, 


3d 


do. 


15, 19 


«< 


Engles, Charles, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 19 


<< 


Hannaford, Frank W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 18 


<( 


' Mahoney, Frederick W., 


5th Mass.,E, 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


«( 


Mclnnis, Joseph W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<< 


Meech, William J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


a 


Sheehan, William F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


(« 


Turnbull, Thomas W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


i< 


Varley, Ralph, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«( 


Lowe, James W., 


5th Mass , E, 


3d 


do. 


- 



Sharpshooters, .... 7 
First class marksmen, . . 6 
Second class marksmen, . . 29 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



12 



54 



COMPANY F, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Hamilton, C. E., 


5th Mass., F, 


D. M., 


50, 50, 47 


Lieutenant, 


Williams, J. F., 




8th Mass., D, 


D. M., 


49, 48, 45 


Sergeant, . 


Pratt, H. B., . 




5th Mass., F, 


D. M., 


48, 47, 42 


Private, 


Jackson, W. B., 




- 


D. M., 


48, 48, 45 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Berry, J. N., . 




6th Mass., I, 


S. S., 


44, 46, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Lejjer, A. J., 




6th Mass., I, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 45 


» 


Coffin, F. S., . 




5th Mass., F, 


s. s., 


44, 47, 50 


Corporal, . 


Parkinson, E. T., 




6th Mass , I, 


s. s., 


45, 47, 43 


<< 


Bronillette, A. P., 




U. S. M. C, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 45 


<( 


Howe. G. A., . 




5th Mass., F, 


S.S-, 


45, 46, 47 


(i 


Webber, C. E., 




6th Mass., I, 


s. s., 


47, 47, 47 


<< 


Wroe, J. W., . 




6th Mass., G, 


o. o., 


48, 47, 43 


Private, 


Bennett, G. A., 




5th Mass., F, 


s. s., 


48, 47, 45 


a 


Button, F. S., . 




- 


s. s., 


44, 47, 43 


it 


Henter, R., 




- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


a 


McCann, W. T., 




- 


s. s., 


48, 46, 44 


<( 


McLeod, R. A., 




5th Mass., F, 


s. s, 


44, 47, 44 


ft 


Merrill, H. I., . 




2dU.S.Cav., 


s. s., 


46, 47, 47 


i( 


Mooney, M. F., 




- 


s. s., 


47, 47, 43 


ti 


Skogland, H., . 




- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


<< 


Smith, H. 0., . 




_ 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


a 


Smith, J. T., . 




1st R. I., 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


Lieutenant, 


Stearns, C. E., . 




5th Mass., F, 


1st Class, 


43, 44, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Brown, S. E., . 




5th Mass., F, 


1st do. 


42. 42, - 


Corporal, . 


Connelly, J. J., 




5th Mass., F, 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


Private, 


Autcliffe, J. T. R., 




- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


«< 


Coffin, C. E., . 




- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


(< 


Mulvanev, J. F., 




5th Mass., C, 


1st do. 


44, 43, - 


<( 


Regan, T. F., . 




- 


1st do. 


45, 44, - 


ti 


Smith, L. M., . 




203 N. Y., 


1st do. 


4.3, 44, - 


Sergeant, . 


Parker, C. L., . 




5th Mass., F, 


2d do. 


19, 18 


Corporal, . 


Woodward, F. W., 




5th Mass., F, 


2d do. 


18,18 


Musician, . 


Piper, R. F., . 




5th Mass., K, 


2d do. 


20, 20 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



129 



COMPANY F, FIFTH INFANTRY— Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Baker, G. F., . 




2d Class, 


18,23 


<< 


Blackwell, H L., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


«< 


Campbell, C. L., 




- 


2d 


do 


18,20 


«< 


Connaughton, J., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


u 


Hardigan, W. J., 




- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


a 


Hines, M. J., . 




5th Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


it 


Mallett, II. A., . 




5th Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


a 


Mattison, C, . 




- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<< 


Merrill, C, 




- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<< 


Malmberg, G. A., 




5th Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


<< 


Murphy, M. J., 




- 


2d 


do. 


19,19 


(< 


Mullen, J. J., . 




5th Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


(t 


Moyse, G. G., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


«< 


Nutting, E. W., 




- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


4< 


Patton, H. S., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


(( 


Rouse, J., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


(< 


Smith, R. D., . 




5th Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


(( 


Southwick, II. A., 




- 


2d 


do. 


19, 20 


<< 


Tompkins, G. E., 




1st Maine, 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


<( 


Vyett, G. H , . 




- 


2d 


do. 


21,23 


(< 


Wark, C. E., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(.( 


Hartnett, J. T., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


(( 


Bennett, W., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16, 18 


ii 


Burke, J, F., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


a 


Coulter, W., . 




-' 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(i 


Fuller, LeRoy, 




- 


3d 


do. 


16, 19 


ii 


Fay, T., . . 




5th Mass., F, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Gould, C W., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


ii 


Holman, L. A., 




- 


3d 


do. 


16, 18 


it 


Swanson, C. A., 




5th Mass., F, 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 4 
Sharpshooters, . . . .18 
First class marksmen, . . 8 



Second class marksmen, . . 25 
Third class marksmen, . . 8 
Total, —63 



COMPANY G, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


McCarthy, Thomas, 


5th Mass., G, 


D. M., 


48, 50,43- 


Sergeant, . 


Gambell, Philip D., . 


5th Mass., G, 


D. M., 


49, 47, 42 


Corporal, . ■ . 


Sweeney, Thomas J., 


- 


D. M., 


50, 47, 43 


<< 


Durward, William A., 


5th Mass., G, 


D. M., 


48, 47, 44 


Private, 


Durward, George, . 


6th Mass., A, 


D. M., 


50, 47, 43 


« 


Durward, James, 


- 


D. M., 


50, 50, 44 


a 


Patten, Lewis W., . 


5th Mass., G, 


D. M., 


47, 46, 44 


Lieutenant, 


Cutler, George S., . 


- 


S. S., 


50, 50, 47 


Corporal, . 


Anderson, Ernest G., 


6th Mass., G, 


S. s., 


48, 47, 43 


(« 


Kean, Frederick C, 


- 


s. s., 


50, 46, 44 


Private, 


Fowle, John L., 


- 


s. s., 


50, 46, 43 


(< 


Rogers, Percival A., 


- 


s. s., 


49, 46, 44 


Lieutenant, 


Marion, Francis H., 


5th Mass., G, 


1st Class, 


46, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Dow, Louis H., 


- 


1st do. 


43,42 


Private, 


Bustead, Robert J., . 


- 


1st do. 


46,45 


a 


Gilliland, Charles F., 


IstN. H., G, 


1st do. 


44,43 


a 


Stowers, Frederick C, 


- 


1st do. 


45,42 


a 


Snow, Rufus J , 


- 


1st do. 


44,43 


Sergeant, . 


Wyer, Edward F., . 


5th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


19,21 


a 


Graham, J. Edward, 


5th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


21,21 


a 


Graham, Frank H., . 


5th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


19,20 


Corporal, . 


Smith, Walter A., . 


— 


2d do. 


23,24 



130 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY G, FIFTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






JRegt. and Co. 








Private, 


Bowdick, "William A., 




2d Class, 


18, 18 


« 


Cannon, Edward J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,23 


{« 


Carswell, William T., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Cuneo, Andrew H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 20 


c« 


Donovan, James A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


(< 


Donovan, Timothy J., 


- . 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Durward, Robert J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,23 


(< 


Eaton, William P., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,19 


«< 


Grothe, Harry, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


<< 


Hammond, James H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


i< 


Keating, Herbert J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


«< 


Larock, Joseph C, . 


oth Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


<< 


Lovering, Edward L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


«< 


Lovering, Frank H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


«« 


Lovering, Myron B., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


«< 


Quinn, Alfred A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Quinn, Charles A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,23 


« 


Quirk, Thomas H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


«< # * \ 


Simonds, A. Ernest, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


«< 


Snow, Elmer F., 


- 


2d 


do. * 


20,21 


<« 


Sweeney, Cornelius "W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


(i 


Tabbut, Charles A., 


6th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


22,25 


(< 


Taylor, John F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 20 


" 


Walker, Joseph F., . 


5th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


« 


Walsh, E. Matthew, 


- 


2d 


do. 


23,24 


<« 


Walsh, John D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


«« 


Alexander, Adolph, 


5th Mass., G, 


3d 


do. 


15,21 


• • 


Bourdon, Arthur J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(« 


Lennon, Charles E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


<( 


Brown, Alfred E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Marion, John T., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«( 


McCarthy, Justin G., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,18 


<< 


Miles, Jesse F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


Sergeant, . 


Barrett, Henry H., . 


5th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Musician, . 


Cummings. Allen, . 


- 


S. S 


•» 


- 


Private, 


Dennin, Charles T., 


9th Mass., H, 


3d Class, 


- 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 7 
Sharpshooters, .... 6 
First class marksmen, . . 6 



Second class marksmen, . . 31 
Third class marksmen, . . 8 
Total, — 58 



COMPANY H, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Meredith, Francis, Jr., . 




S. S 


•> 


44, 46, 45 


Lieutenant, 


Gilson, Valentine E., 


8th Mass., M, 


s. s 




44, 46, 43 


«< 


Latimer, George T., 


5th Mass., H, 


1st Class, 


46, 45, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Davis, Alvin A., Jr., 


5th Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


43, 44, - 


Sergeant, . 


McDonald, Gerald J., 


5th Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


43,47, - 


Corporal, . 


Tukev, Earle, . 


5th Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


43, 42, - 


Bugler, 


Ruppersberg, Frederick, . 


5th Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


43,44, - 


Sergeant, . 


Bense, Theodore L., 


5th Mass , H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Musgrove, Charles A., 


5th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


<i 


Reed, Harry O., 


5th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


k 


Barber, William D., 


5th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


Private, 


Clapp, George P., . 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


«< 


Buist, Arthur A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,23 


«« 


Gray. Ira D., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


«< 


Hodet, George J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Kearney, James I., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,19 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



131 



COMPANY H, FIFTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in TJ. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Lawrence, Charles H., 


5th Mass., H, 


2d Class, 


18, 18 


n m 


Lamb, Edmund J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


ft 


Lafayette, John L., . 


5th Mass., H, 2d 


do. 


22,22 


(1 g 


Pray, William W., . 


U. S. Stmr. 
Iowa. 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


(i 


Swanson, Dennis J., 


9th Mass., D, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(« 


Whiting, Fred L., . 


5th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


22,23 


Corporal, . 


Hughes, James A., . 


5th Mass., H, 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


Private, 


Alloway, Herbert F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


(i 


Dando, George F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


<« 


Durham, Walter D., 


5th Mass., H, 


3d 


do. 


19, 16 


K m 


Innis, Nicholas J., . 


TJ. S. Stmr. 
Catskill. 


3d 


do. 


17,17 


u m 


Kennedy, John J. B., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


»« 


Lyons, Benjamin F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 16 


<( 


Leonard, Charles F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


(< , 


O'Donnell, Martin F , 


17th Co , U. 
S. Signal 
Corps. 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


«< 


Publicover, Henry E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,20 


(< 


Urquhart, Kenneth M., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,18 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Frissette, Herbert J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Burns, Lawrence E., 


5th Mass., H, 


3d 


do. 


- 


C( 


McGregor, Ronald, . 


5th Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Allen, Joseph A., 


5th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


- 


<« m > - 


Bailey, James H., . 


5th Mass., H, 


3d 


do. 


- 


«'< m m 


Holmes, Warner A. J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


c< 


Power, Maurice J , . 


9th Mass., D, 


2d 


do. 


- 


(C 


Riley, Benjamin F., 


5th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


_ 


(i 


Sheehan, Timothy, . 


— 


2d 


do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, .... 2 
First class marksmen, . . 6 
Second class marksmen, . . 20 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



14 
17 



59 



Sergeant, . 


Mowry, F. I., . 


_ 


1st Class, 


42,43 


Lieutenant, 


Cook, L. W 


5th Mass., I, 


2d do. 


18,20 


1st Sergeant, 


Williams, T. F., 


5th Mass., I, 


2d do. 


21, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Gay, C. E., . . . 


5th Mass., I, 


2d do. 


19,19 


(< 


TJhlig, H. C, . 


5th Mass., I, 


2d do. 


18,18 


<< 


Brander, A. J., 


- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


Corporal, . 


Prew, A. L., . 


- 


2d do. 


22, 18 


<( 


Gross, F. M., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,18 


<< 


Cumberland, J. G., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Austin, F. B., . 


- 


2d do. 


21,21 


<« 


Carlisle, Geo., Jr., . 


- 


2d do. 


21, 19 


<< 


Cunningham, C. E., 


5th Mass., I, 


2d do. 


18,20 


<< 


Cooney, J. T., . 


- 


2d do. 


20, 18 


(<< 


Ford, G. B., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


(« 


Ford, S. L., . . . 


- 


2d do. 


20,19 


«< 


Fountain, C. D., 


- 


2d do. 


20,18 


<« 


Gross, A. A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


a 


Gross, E. E., . 


- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


«< 


Holbrook, G. S., 


- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


<i 


MacWhinnie, H., 


- 


2d do. 


21, 18 


(i 


Nerney, R. N., 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


a 


Gstiguy, E. A., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 



132 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY I, FIFTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Eegt. and Co. 








Private, 


Parks, J. H., . 




2d Class, 


20,20 


< i 


Pelkey, P. S., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


~* * << 


Perrv, W. F., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Purdy, A. W., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Corporal, . 


Pike, G. D., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


« 


Wry, T. A., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


Private, 


Cobb, A, M., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


21, 17 


c« 


Guest, W. J., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


<< 


Leonard, G. W., 




- 


3d 


do. 


17,17 


(< 


O'Connor, C. F., 




- 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


u 


Pietzsch, H., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16,15 


i( 


Pike, J. P., 




- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


a 


Pink, E. W., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


17, 17 


a 


Slater, W. G., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<< 


Titus, G. E., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


19, 17 


a 


Wanag, C, 




- 


3d 


do. 


17, 18 


« 


White, P. E., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


19, 15 


<( 


Carley, J. H., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


- 


(< 


Hall, C. S , 




- 


3d 


do. 


- 


«( 


Heley, J. J., 




- 


3d 


do. 


- 


cc 


Hornig, J. A., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


- 


« 


Prue, W. J., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


- 


Captain, 


Goff, W. H., Jr., 




5th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


_ 


Lieutenant, 


Northup, F. W., 




- 


1st 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Gorman, W. E., 




oth Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


- 


<( 


Robbins, B., 




— 


2d 


do. 


- 



First class marksmen, . . 3 
Second class marksmen, . . 26 
Third class marksmen, . . 19 



Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



15 



63 



COMPANY K, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



Corporal, . 


Delano, Leon W., . 


5th Mass., K, 


1st Class, 


44,42 


Captain, 


Colbert, Maurice A., 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Lieutenant, 


Leslie, William J., . 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


23,22 


1st Sergeant, 


Barrett, Herbert F., 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Pierce, Frank P., 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


Sergeant, . 


Foster, Daniel F, . 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Matthews, Henry J., 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


(< 


Hennessey, Thomas J., . 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Morrissey, William E., . 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<t 


Sheehan, Patrick J., 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Collagan, William J., 


2d Artillery, 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


M 


Deslauries, Charles W., . 


5th Mass., K. 


2d 


do. 


22, 22 


(« 


Ford, Dennis J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,18 


Private, 


Curtis, Henry L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


<< 


Ford, John E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


(« 


Howland, Edgar W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<« 


Johnson, Roscoe W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


«< 


Levangie, Samuel H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,20 


«< 


Martell, Thomas F., 


5th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


«< 


McLeod, Abraham M., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


«« 


McKay, Andrew, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<« 


McCarthy, Richard P., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 18 


«< 


Parker, George F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


<< 


Patterson, William, 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


a 


Raymond, Isaac F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


<< 


Ripley, George W., . 


— 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



133 



COMPANY K, FIFTH INFANTRY - Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Sank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


Spiller, Albert E. M., 




2d Class, 


22, 18 


(< 


Storme, William G., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Sampson, Willard B., 


- 


2d do. 


19,18 


a 


Warner, David M., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


(t 


Deslauries, John L., 


- 


3d ' do. 


16, 15 


<« 


Feeley, John, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Stone, Ray W., 


- 


3d do. 


15,16 


<< 


Thaxter, Charles W., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


Lieutenant, 


McGrath, John R., . 


5th Mass., K, 


S. S., 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Odom, John S., 


8th Mass , M, 


1st Class, 


- 


Private, 


Allen, Thodore B., . 


- 


3d do. 


_ 


<( 


Rieppe, William J., . 


- 


3d do. 


— 



Sharpshooter, .... 1 
First class marksmen, . . 2 
Second class marksmen, . . 29 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



6 
23 
— 61 



COMPANY L, FIFTH INFANTRY. 



1st Sergeant 

G> M. Serge 

Sergeant, . 
<< 


ant, . 


<< 




Corporal, 


• 


Private, 


. 


«< 


. 


u 




(( 




Lieutenant, 


. 


<( 


. 


Sergeant, 


. 


Corporal, 


• 


<( 


t # 


<< 




Musician, 




Private, 


, . 


(< 




(< 




«( 




<< 


, 


<( 




<< 




a 




(C 




<« 


» • 


<< 




a 




«< 




<< 




(< 




(« 




t< 




«« 




a 




<< 




u 


■ 



Lutes, Welsford J., . 
Berg, C. David, 
Tucker, Fred W., . 
Berg, J. Emanuel, . 
Jacobs, Joseph C, . 
Spraker, John C, Jr., 
Tracy, William J., . 
Caffarella, Charles A., 
Pearson, Albert F., . 
Gordon, Harry S., . 
Tarbox, Walter, 
Mann, James H., .. 
Perkins, Clarence A., 
Bacon, Henry C, 
Mitchell, William E., 
Loring, Frederick M., 
Barnes, Ara E., 
Haverstock, James A., 
Cooper, J. Fred., 
Alberty, Frank R., . 
Bacon, William F., Jr., 
Balczo, Andrew L., . 
Bell, Clarence F., 
Bates, Henry A., 
Cleveland, W. Emerson, 
Collins, John J., 
Haven, H. Ernest, . 
Mahoney, Thomas F., 
Matthews, Charles F., 
Marston, Clarence C, 
McCarrick,' Clarence R., 
Morton, Theodore, . 
Papkee, Edward E., 
Sabean, George M., . 
Seymour, Joseph E., 
Shanley, George J., . 
Spelman, George H., 
Spraker, Edwin E., . 
Tracy, Thomas E., . 
Thompson, Robert H., 



5th Mass., L, 
5th Mass., L, 
5th Mass., L, 
5th Mass., L, 



5th Mass., L, 
5th Mass., L, 
5th Mass , L, 

5th Mass., L, 
5th Mass., L, 
5th Mass , Jj, 



5th Mass., E, 



D. M., 

D. M., 
S. S., 

s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 

1st Class, 

1st do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 



49, 48, 42 

50, 47, 44 
44, 47, 44 
50, 50, 47 
48, 47, 44 
48, 50, 45 
46, 47, 45 
48, 47, 43 
44, 47, 44 
45,44, - 
42,46, - 

21,21 



20 
23 
20 
22 
19 
18 
18 
19 
23 
22 
20 
23 
20 
20 
19 
18 
21 
22 
18 
20 
22 
20 
19 
20 
20 
23 
22 
20 



19 
23 
20 
21 
19 
18 
18 
18 
22 
21 
19 
21 
18 
18 
IS 
18 
21 
20 
18 
19 
20 
19 
18 
18 
19 
21 
21 
18 



134 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY L, FIFTH INFANTRY -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


White, Charles L., . 




2d Class, 


20, 19 


" . . 


Anderson, Leonard A., . 


- 


3d do. 


17,15 


" . . 


Anderson, Charles A., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


" • • . 


Dawes, Benjamin A., 


- 


3d do. 


18,16 


" . . 


Hardman, J. William, 


- 


3d do. 


16,15 


" . . 


Killion, William M., 


- 


3d do. 


17,15 


Captain, 


Cutting, Frank F., . 


5th Mass., L, 


2d do. 


- 


Corporal, . 


Pickering, Frank C., 


- 


1st do. 


- 


Private, 


Bell, George W., 


- 


2d do. 


- 


u 


Goodwin, Howard F., 


- 


3d do. 


_ 


<< 


Hindon, George F , . 


- 


S. S., 


- 


<( 


Peterson, Fred. W., 


- 


1st Class, 


_ 


(< 


Sarkesian, Dickson M., . 


- 


2d do. 


— 


Distinguished 


marksmen, . . 2 


Third class marksmen, 


. 6 


Sharpshooters 


, . . . .8 


Unqualified members, 


. 5 


First class ma 


rksmen, . . 4 


Total, . 


. # 


. —58 


Second class r 


narksmen, . . 33 








COMPANY M, FIFTH INFANTRY. 


Lieutenant, 


Groves, Charles H., . 




D. M., 


48, 46, 45 


Sergeant, . 


Dupree, Jerrie, . 


5th Mass., M, 


S. S., 


44, 46, 42 


Private, 


Hastings, William A., 


5th Mass., M, 


s. s., . 


44, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


Shortsleeve, Joseph F., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


Private, 


Travers, Thomas, . 


- 


s. s , 


44, 46, 42 


Sergeant. . 


Duley, Frank P., 


- 


1st Class, 


45,42, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Moore, Harry C, 


- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Corporal, . 


Reddy, Thomas A.,. 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Sawtell, Percival A., 


5th Mass., F, 


1st do. 


46, 45, - 


Private, 


Sheridan, John J., . 


- 


1st do. 


43,42, - 


Captain, 


Whittemore, Everard, 


5th Mass., M, 


1st do. 


44,43, - 


Private, 


Baker, George H., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


Corporal, . 


Barker, Charles A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,22 


Private, 


Beach, William R., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


(< 


Goldstene, Julius, . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


Sergeant, . 


Healy, Patrick E., . 


U.S. Artillery, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Keefe, George F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


Corporal, . 


Martel, Levi C, 


5th Mass., M, 


2d do. 


18,18 


Private, 


Martin, James M., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


t< 


McCarty, Thomas L., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Musician, . 


McConnell, George A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


McDermott, John J., 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


«i 


McGrath, Patrick H., 


- 


2d do. 


21,23 


«( 


Moore, Charles H., . 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 


<< 


Mullen, Christopher J., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


«< 


Perrin, Edward C, . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Persons, William L., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Reilly, John H., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Reilly, James 0., 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 


" . . 


Rogers, James W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


fi # , 


Shea, Patrick H., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


*' . . 


Sheridan, Robert E., 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


<* . . 


Taillon, Clement D., 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


** . . 


Therrien, Samuel, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


*' . , 


Alcorn, John S., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


• 


Bailey, W. Carl, 


" 


3d do. 


16, 18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



135 



COMPANY M, FIFTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Bateman, Dennis, . 




3d Class, 


16, 18 


a 


, . 


Boisseau, William, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


. 


Bondreau, Joseph E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,20 


(< 


. 


Goding, Walter L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


(i 


, . 


Hill, Clarence L., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


u 


. 


Kerrigan, Thomas 0., 


5th Mass., M, 


3d 


do. 


17,19 


Corporal, 


. 


McLean, Isaac C, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


Private, 


. 


Murphy, Edward T., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


. 


Raymond, Earl M., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 . 


«« 


. 


Sheppard, William F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(< 


. 


Vincent, Arthur C, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


«< 


. 


Abajian, Charles H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


_ 


Corporal, 


. 


Chase, Ernest L., 


5th Mass., M, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Private, 


. 


Foley, Johnnie J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


<« 


. 


Holbrook, Charles W., . 


6th Mass., F, 


1st 


do. 


_ 


<« 


. 


Jacobs, Robert E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


_ 


«« 


. 


Lyman, James P., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


<« 


• 


Wellington, LeRoy S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


Distinguished marksman, ..IT 


hird class marksmen 




. 15 


Sharpshooters, .... 4 "U 


nqualified members, 




. 6 


First class marksmen, . . 7 


Total, . 


. 


. —60 


Second class marksmen, . . 27 








FIELD AND STAFF, S: 


CXTH INFANTRY. 





Color Sergeant, 
Major, 

Lieutenant, 



Lieut. Colonel, 

Colonel, 

Sergeant Major, 
Chief Bugler, 
Sergeant Major, 
Lieutenant, 
Sergeant Major, 

Major, 
Drum Major, 

Chaplain, . 
Orderly, 
Hosp. Steward, 

Captain, 



Com. Sergeant, 
Color Sergeant, 
Major, 



Faber, George, . 
Sweetser, Warren E., 
Cook, Cyrus H., 
Decker, William N., 
Hart, Joseph S., 
Hunton, Lewis G., . 

Priest, George H., . 

Darling, Charles K., 

Dewey, Edgar O., . 
Emmott, Philip M., . 
Forbush, Preston D., 
Taylor, Franklin G., 
Bruch, John E., 
Cull, John W., 
Marshall, Isaac N., . 
Metcalf, Frank J., . 

Perry, J. De Wolf, . 
Poole, W. Frank, . 
Ryder, Stephen E., . 

Dwinnell, Clifton H., 
Coolidge, Clarence W., 

Silk, Frederic C. M., 
Ames, Francis C, . 
Dow, George F., 



1st Mass., A, 
6th Mass., H, 
6th Mass., I, 
6th Mass., I, 
6th Mass., I, 
6th Mass., 

Staff. 
6th Mass., 

Field. 
6 1 h M a s s . , 

Field. 

6th Mass., I, 
6th Mass., E, 
6th Mass., F, 



6th Mass 

N. C. S. 



6th Mass., 
N. C. S. 

6th Mass. , 

Staff. 
6th Mass., G, 
6th Mass., H, 
6th Mass., 

Staff. 



D. M., 


D. M., 


S. S 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 


•> 


s.s 


> 


1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


S.S 


•> 


S. S 




1st Class, 


2d 


do. 



49, 50, 43 
48, 50, 43 

44, 46, 42 

45, 47, 43 
45, 47, 45 
48, 49, 42 

47, 47, 43 

43,45, - 

43.44, - 
43,42, - 
44, 45, - 

45.45, - 
19, 19 
20,21 

18, 18 
19,21 

20,20 
19,21 

19, 19 

16, 18 



136 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



FIELD AND STAFF, SIXTH INFANTRY -Concluded. 











Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 




Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. • 


P. M. Sergeant, . 


McPeck, Neal E., . 






2d Class, 




Captain, 


Sweetser, Stanwood G 




6th Mass., 


2d do. 


- 








Staff. 




Lieutenant? 


Taylor, Brainerd, 


. 


6th Mass., A, 


2d do. 


- 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Whiteman, Clark D., 


• 


- . 


2d do. 


— 


Distinguished marksmen, . . 2 


Third class marksman, 


. 1 


Sharpshooters, .... 7 


Unqualified member, 


. 1 


First class marksmen, . . 6 


Total 


. —29 


Second class marksmen, . . 12 







COMPANY A, SIXTH INFANTRY, 



Bugler, 


Bourgeois, Samuel, . 




D. M., 


50, 49, 46 


Private, 


Chesfey, George W., 


6th Mass., A, 


D.M., 


50, 50, 43 


« 


Coombs, Chester A., 


- 


D.M., 


50, 49, 42 


Captain, 


Gray, Frank E., 


6th Mass., A 
and K. 


D. M., 


50, 47, 44 


Private, 


Jefts, George M., 


- 


D. M., 


50, 48, 43 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Keough, James H., . 


6th Mass , A, 


D. M., 


50, 50, 49 


Lieutenant, 


McMahon, John H., 


6th Mass., A, 


D. M., 


50, 50, 49 


<( 


Morrison, Elmer E., 


6th Mass., A, 


D.M., 


50, 50, 47 


Private, 


Murphy, William R., 


6th Mass., A 
andN. C.S. 


D. M., 


49, 50, 43 


(« 


Reid, George W., . 


6th Mass., A, 


D. M., 


50, 50, 43 


«{ 


Sedgley, Alton R., . 


6th Mass., A, 


D. M., 


47, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


Card, George W., 


6th Mass , A, 


S. S., 


45, 47, 46 


<< 


Connelly, Edward J., 


6th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


Private, 


Cronin, Jeremiah J., 


- 


s. s., 


50, 48, 44 


<< 


Croke, Thomas M., . 


6th Mass., H, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


Dingle, Manuel, 


U. S. Stmr. 
Terror. 


s. s., 


50, 46, 43 


Private, 


Gammons, George E., 


s. s., 


45, 47, 42 


it 


Gibson, Robert E , . 


- 


s. s., 


50, 50, 47 


1st Sergeant, 


Haley, William A., . 


6th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


44, 49, 44 


Private, 


Hills, John C, . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


Corporal, . 


Hunt, Walter G., . 


- 


s. s., 


50, 47, 43 


Sergeant, . 


McDonald, Thomas A., . 


6th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 45 


Private, 


Menaden, Sydney J., 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


Merrill, Rufus A., . 


6th Mass., H, 


s. s., 


48, 48, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Mortimer, Clifford, . 


6th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


Private, 


Roberts, Richard A., 


6th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


<« 


Shanahan, Daniel W., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 47, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Sweetser, Walter I., 


6th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


48, 46, 46 


Private, 


Walsh, James P., . 


- 


s. s., 


47, 46, 42 


M 


Widell, John M., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


«< 


Barrett, Richard E., 


- 


1st Class, 


42,43, - 


(« 


Hanley, Thomas, 


- 


1st do. 


43, 42, - 


it 


Keander, Arthur F. L., . 


- 


1st do. 


43,42, - 


(< 


McManus, George W., . 


- 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


(1 


Rodgers, Fred H., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Ronan, J. Fred, 


6th Mass., A, 


1st do. 


43,43, - 


Private, 


Sweeney, George T., 


- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


« 


Aldrich, Clifton H., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Bancroft, John R., . 


6th Mass., A, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Butler, Charles J., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


<« 


Clothey, Edward T., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Cosman, Richard A., 


6th Mass., M, 


2d do. 


22,22 


it 


Collins, Louis E., . 


— 


2d do. 


19, 21 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Ko. 



137 



COMPANY A, SIXTH INFANTRY- Concluded. 







Service in TJ. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


Cane, Clarence P., . 


5th Mass., L, 


2d Class, 


19, 20 




4 . . 


Creagh, Harry J., . 


- 


2d do. 


22, 22 




' . . 


Cuzner, Herbert J., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 




4 . . 


Foster, Harold H., . 


U. S. Navy, 


2d do. 


18, 19 




4 . . 


Eaton, Wilfred P., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 




4 . . 


Haley, Jesse A., 


6th Mass., A, 


2d do. 


20, 21 




4 . . 


Hanright, Cecil G., . 


- 


2d do. 


21, 21 




4 . . 


Hastings, William M., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 




4 . . 


Krorn, William M., . 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 19 




c • 9 9 


Leisk, John A., 


_ 


2d do. 


20,20 




4 . . 


Lyons, John, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 




4 . . 


McNeill, Stanley H., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 




4 . . 


Miller, Louis J., 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 




4 , . 


Peterson, Christel, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 21 




4 . . 


Reynolds, Philip J , 


7th W. S. I, 


2d do. 


18, 18 




4 . . 


Robertson, Henry S , 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 




* . , 


Skelton, Fred W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 




* . . 


Sproull, Walter R., . 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 






Sullivan, Charles, 


— 


2d do. 


18, 19 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 11 
Sharpshooters, . . . .19 
First class marksmen, . . 7 



Second class marksmen, . . 25 
Total, —62 



Captain, 


Smith, James C, 


6th Mass., B, 


S. S., 


47, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Gilson, Frank V., . 


6th Mass., B, 


s. s., 


48, 46, 45 


1st Sergeant, 


Akeley, Charles E.,'. 


6th Mass., B, 


s. s., 


45, 47, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Trombly, George H., 


6th Mass., B, 


s. s., 


46, 50, 43 


<« 


Tedford, William J., 


- 


S.S., 


47, 46, 44 


a 


Woolford, Edward R., . 


_ 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


Alison, Harry A., . 


- 


S.S., 


44, 46, 42 


<( 


Holden, George H., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


(< 


Nicoll, David A., 


_ 


s. s., 


45, 47, 42 


« 


Savage, Charles T., . 


_ 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


Private, 


Ashline, Albert S., . 


- 


S.S., 


46, 46, 42 


« 


Boyden, George W., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


(c 


Cox, Edwin A., 


-. 


s. s., 


44, 48, 43 


<« 


Howe, George W., . 


- 


s. s , 


46, 46, 43 


«< 


Marlow, Edward, . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


(< 


McComisky, Charles F., . 


6th Mass., B, 


S.S., 


46, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Lawrence, Sumner B., 


6th Mass., B, 


1st Class, 


42,45, - 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Robinson, Charles W., . 


- 


1st do. 


43,44, - 


Corporal, . 


Gay, Charles H., 


- 


1st do. 


43,42, - 


Musician, . 


Lancey, Edwin B., . 


6th Mass., B, 


1st do. 


43,43, - 


Private, 


Baldwin, Harry A., . 


- 


1st do. 


44,44, - 




' . . 


Callum, George, 


- 


1st do. 


42, 45, - 




' . . 


Bennett, Harry M., . 


- 


1st do. 


43,46, - 




4 . . 


Gay, Richard, . 


- 


1st do. 


45,42, - 




4 . 


Holden, William G., 


- 


1st do. 


44, 42, - 




4 . . 


Holland, Fred. P., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 43, - 




4 


Kerry, Joseph T., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 43, - 




' . . 


Rude, Thomas E., . 


- 


1st do. 


47,43, - 




4 . . 


Savage, Amos C, 


_ 


1st do. 


44,43, - 




* . . 


Savage, William H., 


_ 


1st do. 


42,43, - 




. . 


Wheeler, William A., 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


Corporal, . 


Allen, Harry S., 


- 


2d do. 


22,21 


a 


Edwards, Clarence A., . 


6th Mass., B, 


2d do. 


19,18 



138 ADJUTANT GEISTEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



COMPANY B, SIXTH INFANTKY - Concluded. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Private, 



Ardis, Arthur, . 
Boutwell, George W., 
Bryce, Charles R., . 
Cairns, Malcom, 
Cunningham, Alexander, 
Dorais, Henry, . 
Fernald, Ralph E., . 
Fisher, Harry J., 
Gay, Joseph B., 
Gomez, Jerry, . 
Grey, Sidney H., 
Harley, William M., 
Harley, Bruce, . 
Harrington, Herbert T., 
Raddy, Bedford A., 
McLean, Alex. C, . 
Newton, Willie E., . 
Nygard, Gustaf, 
Olsen, Charles A., . 
Pike, George C, 
Romans, Carl A., 
Smith, Henry S., 
Stott, Isaac W, 
Thorndike, Herbert A., 
Ware, Warren N., . 
Webb, Edward C, . 
Whitney, Allen E., . 
Boutelle, Clarence A., 
Marsden, George P., 
Stewart, Minot R., . 



6th Mass., B, 



6th Mass., B, 



2d Class, 


21, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


22, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


3d 


do. 


18, 


3d 


do. 


18, 


3d 


do. 


18, 



21 
18 
19 
21 
19 
18 
18 
18 
20 
20 
19 
18 
19 
18 
19 
18 
18 
19 
21 
19 
18 
19 
18 
18 
21 
20 
18 
16 
17 
17 



Sharpshooters, . 


. 16 


Third class marksmen, 


. 3 


First class marksmen, 


. 15 


Total 


. —63 


Second class marksmen, . 


. 29 







COMPANY C, SIXTH INFANTRY. 



Sergeant, . 
Private, 
Sergeant, . 
Q. M. Sergeant, 
Private, 

Lieutenant, 

Captain, 

Private, 

Sergeant, . 
(< 

Lieutenant, 

Corporal, . 

Private, 
(i 

Corporal, . 
Private, 

Corporal, . 
Private, 

Musician, . 

Corporal, . 



Berry, Walter P., . 
Burns, James, . 
Chandler, Bert. W., . 
Clogston, Ralph W., 
Colby, Arthur D., . 
Flynn, Lor en E., 
Kelsey, John H., 
Kittredge, Colby T., 
Linscott, Thomas I., 
McQuesten, Harry N., 
Mitchell, Alexander D., 
Pearson, Gardner W., 
Peterson, George W., 
Robinson, William J., 
Rodger, Andrew Y., 
Saunders, Benjamin P., 
Stanley, Arthur G., . 
Swaby, Percy E., 
Williams, John D., . 
Doyle, Matthew J., . 
Hanagan, Edward M., 



6th Mass., C, 


S. S. 




- 


s. s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s. s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s. s. 




- 


s. s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s. s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s. s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s. s. 




- 


s.s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s. s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s. s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s.s. 




6th Mass., C, 


s. s. 




- 


s.s. 




_ 


s.s. 




_ 


s. s. 




- 


s.s. 




_ 


s. s. 




_ 


s.s. 




_ 


1st Class, 


- 


1st do. 



46, 47, 45 
50, 48, 45 

47, 46, 43 

48, 47, 46 

47, 46, 42 

49, 47, 44 

49, 47, 47 

46, 47, 44 

45, 42, 43 

48, 47, 45 

47, 46, 47 

46, 46, 46 
46, 46, 46 

50, 48, 44 
50, 49, 45 
50, 50, 45 

48, 46, 43 
50, 48, 50 
44, 47, 46 
44,47, - 
44,42, - 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



139 



COMPANY C, SIXTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Greig, James N , 




1st Class, 


47,49, - 


<< 


Kirk, William. . 


- 


1st 


do. 


43, 43, - 


a 


Mitchell, William A., 


- 


1st 


do. 


46,46, - 


<i 


Parfitt, William J., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


45, 46, - 


Corporal, . 


Rivet, J. Douglass, . 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 42, - 


Private, 


Bouchard, Eleazer J., 


6th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Caverly, Harold, 


- 


2d 


do. 


22 


23 


(< 


Cavanaugh, Joseph, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


20 


u 


Connell, George H.,. 


6th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


22 


18 


<( 


Decatur, Clarence R., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


Corporal, . 


Duffy, Charles J., . 


6th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


19 


20 


Private, 


Eastman, Raymond W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


19 


«< 


Faulkner, Charles, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


Corporal, . , 


Going, Russell S., . 


6th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


Private, 


Henry, William, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


19 


<( 


Jones, Arthur E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


<< 


Kelleher, Cornelius J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


, 18 


a 


Leavy, Sanford P., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


, 18 


<( 


Lyons, William, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


<( 


McLean, Elmer, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


21 


<( 


O'Brien, Frank D., . 


6th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


20 


19 


<( 


O'Hearn, Francis J., 


6th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


<( 


O'Neil, Henry, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


23 


18 


<< 


Phelps, George J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


(< 


Poole, Thomas, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


u ' 


Pratt, Willard D., . 


6th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


22 


21 


«« 


Ryan, Maynard A- N., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


20 


(< 


Trueworthy, Ralph E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


20 


«( 


Weillrenner, Isaac A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


21 


Sergeant, . 


Wisener, Leslie J., . 


6th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


Private, 


Hope, Arthur, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


19 


<< 


McKenzie. James, . 


6th Mass., C, 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 


<( 


Myers, John, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 


a 


Norie, Alexander, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


19 


<( 


Preston, Benjamin P., 


. 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 


<< 


Ramsay, Albert J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


<« 


Sanborn, George W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 


c« 


Simoneau, James C, 


_ 


3d 


do. 


20 


17 


(< 


Tyrrell, Walter B , . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


17 


<< 


Young, Robert J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


<< 


Aldrich, Eugene L., 


6th Mass., C, 


1st 


do. 


- 


(< 


Faneuf, Charles L., . 


6th Mass., C, 


1st 


do. 


- 



Sharpshooters, . . . .19 
First class marksmen, . . 9 
Second class marksmen, . . 25 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



10 



63 



COMPANY D, SIXTH INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 
Q. M. Sergeant, 
Sergeant, 



Corporal, 
Captain, 
Corporal, 
Private, 
1st Sergeant, 



Conrad, William L., 
McDowell, John F., 
O'Connor, John J., . 
Pepper, Thomas F-, 
Sheehan, Timothy J., 
Wild, George, . 
Whelan, Andrew J., 
Bonner, Charles, 
Churchill, Charles F., 
McDowell, Jeremiah J., 



6th Mass., D, 
6th Mass., D, 
6th Mass., D, 
6th Mass., D, 



6th Mass., D, 
6th Mass., D, 

6th Mass., D, 



s. 


S., 


s. 


s., 


s. 


s., 


s. 


s., 


s. 


s., 


S. 


s., 


s. 


s., 


1st Class, 


1st do. 


1st do. 



46, 47, 43 
46, 48, 48 
44, 47, 44 
46, 46, 43 
46, 47, 46 

44, 46, 43 

45, 48, 44 
44,43, - 
44,43, - 
44,46, - 



140 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY D, SIXTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 



Rank. 



Xasik. 



Service in U- S. 

Volunteers-, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Private, 



Corpora], 

Lieutenant, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 

Corpora], 

Private, 



Corporal, 
Private, 



Sergeant, 
Private, 

Corpora], 
Private, 
Musician, 
Private, 



Winters, Thomas E., 
Bosley, George, 
Brizard, Arthur F., . 
Campbell, Walter G., 
Cotter, John J., 
Devine, Patrick H., . 
Dolan, William H., . 
Driscoll, Frank D., . 
Dougherty, Joseph W., 
Edson, Fred E., 
Girard, Joseph A., . 
Girardin, Arthur A., 
Harrington, Lester H., 
Heelan, Jerry E., 
Henault, Mastai J., . 
Jennings, Peter, 
Kent, John T., 
Killelea, John F., . 
Langley, George W., 
Lacier, Henry E., . 
Martin, James, 
Moriarty, Daniel J., 
McDowell, Joseph H., 
Poulin, Ermene, 
Preston, Joseph H., . 
Proffin, Charles, 
Richards, Ben T., . 
Richards, Napoleon P., 
Royea, Joseph Z., . 
St. Cyr, Adolph, 
Whelan, James E., . 
Worster, Fred. D., . 
Brizard, Joseph N., . 
Crowe, Charles J., . 
Dufort, John B., 
Feeley, Alfred T., . 
Foisey, Elzear, 
Gokey, Joseph L., . 
Killelea, Charles H., 
Lavoie, Maxin, 
Moison, Joseph, 
Murphy, George W., 
McCarthy, Charles H., 
Maher, William N , 
McCormick, Timothy J., 
Pearson, HermonD., 
Reardon, William E., 
Shea, Daniel, . 
Surette, Arthur, 
Willette, Phillippe, . 



6th Mass., D, 



6th Mass., D, 
6th Mass., D, 



6th Mass., D, 



6th Mass., D, 



6th Mass., D, 



1st Class, 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 



42.44, - 
21,19 
21, 20 
19,19 
19,18 
21, 18 
19, 19 
22,20 
18, 18 
22,20 
22,22 
18, 19 

18, 19 

19, 18 
18, 18 
18, 18 
19,20 
18, 18 
18, 18 
21, 18 
21, 18 
19,20 
18,18 

20, 19 

18, 18 

19, 18 
19, 18 
18, 18 
18, 19 

18, 19 

19, 19 
19, 19 

16, 15 
15, 16 
15, 16 
15, 16 
15, 16 
15, 15 

15, 16 

17, 15 

16, 15 
16, 17 

18, 15 
15, 15 
16,17 

15, 15 

16, 16 

15, 15 

16, 15 
15, 15 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen. 



7 

4 

31 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, 



18 

— 60 



COMPANY B, SIXTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 
Lieutenant, 



Damon, Herbert W., 
Sullivan, George W., 
Kendall, Frederic M., 



6th Mass , E, 
6th Mass., E, 
6th Mass., E, 




47, 47, 46 
I 45, 47, 45 
, 46, 49, 43 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



141 



COMPANY E, SIXTH INFANTRY - Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Bank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Sergeant, . 


Coolidge, George R., 


_ 


S. S 


5 


45, 46, 48 


<< 


Haeuber, Walter, 


5th Mass., B, 


S. S 


) 


45, 47, 42 


Corporal, . 


Forbush, Herbert A., 


6th Mass., E, 


S. S 


•> 


45, 48, 43 


a 


Lewis, Robert M., . 


- 


S. S 


> 


45, 46, 43 


a 


Lord, E. Wyman, . 


- 


S. S 


J 


48, 47, 44 


Musician, . 


Hardigan, William C, 


6th Mass., E, 


S. S 


•J 


44, 47, 42 


Private, 


Fuller, Harold T., . 


- 


S. S 


*> 


44, 46, 44 


a 


Heffernon, Mark A.., 


- 


s. s 


■> 


44, 46, 44 


<< 


Vollmer, Cornelius R., . 


- 


s. s 


•» 


45, 48, 46 


Sergeant, . 


Ganaway, Francis J., 


6th Mass., E, 


1st Class, 


43,44, - 


a 


Sanderson, Frank E., 


6th Mass., E, 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


Corpora], . 


Pease, Charles W. S., 


6th Mass., E, 


1st 


do. 


46, 42, - 


Private, 


Blease, Ernest, . 


- 


1st 


do. 


43,44, - 


<« 


Gerry, Arthur M., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


46, 42, - 


<« 


Lord, Frank S., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 42, - 


<< 


Rice, William A., . 


_ 


1st 


do. 


44, 44, - 


(i 


Snow, Chester D., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 44, - 


u 


Videto, Charles T., . 


6th Mass., E, 


1st 


do. 


47,46, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Taylor, Walter F., . 


6th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Brown, John W., 


6th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


Corporal, . 


Tuttle, Herbert E., . 


6th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


n 


Simpson, Cbauncey L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 20 


a 


Moore, William H., Jr., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


Private, 


Acorn, Forest S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


(i 


Algie, George D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


23,21 


(< 


Chamberlain, Wilbur G., 


- 


2d 


do. 


23, 18 


(< 


Crawford, Edgar H., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Davis, Ralph 0., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Doughty, Oscar M., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<< 


Eldredge, Delbert, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


a 


Forbes, Harry B., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


<< 


French, Leon T., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


<< 


Ganaway, George A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


a 


Gormley, Frank J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


24, 20 


a 


Grout, Frank E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 18 


(< 


Hamilton, James I., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


«( 


Hildreth, Herbert W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Johnson, Dana F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


<< 


Kimball, Harry A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


(C 


McGrath, Edward S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 20 


«< 


McLaughlin, Duncan L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22, 19 


<< 


Morgan, Henry, 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,21 


(( 


Sharpe, Arthur H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


«( 


Spreadbury, Albert E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


« 


Stockw ell, 'Henry F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 20 


a 


Williamson, Thomas R., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Wright, John S., . 


- • 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


u 


Archdale, Charles E., 


6th Mass., E, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Ambrose, John J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Brown, Richard F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


19, 17 


tt 


Chase, Ralph, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


i( 


Cook, Frank H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


i< 


Findlay, William J. W., . 


5th Mass., M, 


3d 


do. 


18, 16 


(C 


Glover, .Frank E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


18,17 


(< 


Hayward, Carl F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


<< 


Hunter, Israel G., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


<< 


Lincoln, Fred R., 


- 


3d 


do. 


19,17 


<< 


Lord, Henry L M 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 17 


<( 


Merritt, William K., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 15 


(< 


Sandford, George L., 


" 


3d 


do. 


18,15 


Sharpshooters 


;, . . . .12 


Third class marksmen 


» 


. 13 


First class mt 


irksmen, . . 9 


Total, . 




. —63 


Second class 


marksmen, . . 29 













142 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY F, SIXTH INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Captain, 


Cutter, Frank E., . 


6th Mass., F, 


S. S., 


44, 46, 46 


Lieutenant, 


Holt, Elden L., 


6th Mass., F, 


S. S., 


46, 47, 42 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Hapgood, Warren E., 


6th Mass., F, 


S. S., 


46, 46, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Payne, Arthur N., . 


- 


S. S., 


45, 46, 43 


(< 


Small, Charles H., . 


6th Mass., F, 


S.S., 


45, 46, 44 


«< 


Turner, Frank J., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 44 


Corporal, . 


Perry, Harry C, 


- 


s. s., 


44, 49, 42 


a 


Waul, Clarence P., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


Private, 


Berry, Riley A., 


6th Mass., F, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 46 


<( 


Comey, Bernard E., 


2d Mass., B, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


t< 


Green, Robert E., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


«« 


Goddard, Roscoe G., 


_ 


s. s., 


44, 46, 42 


<« 


Hemenway, Howard F., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


Morton, Burton L., . 


- 


1st Class, 


42,44, - 


Musician, . 


Dufresne, Emile J., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


Private, 


Donovan, John F., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


<i 


Howe, Herbert L., . 


_ 


1st do. 


42, 43, - 


Lieutenant, 


Howe, Ernest A., . 


6th Mass., F, 


2d do. 


21, 19 


1st Sergeant, 


Bishop, David H., . 


6th Mass., F, 


2d do. 


20 


, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Pratt, Fred. W., 


- 


2d do. 


21 


,21 


Corporal, . 


Baker, Rolan H., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


, 18 


«< 


Cole, William, . 


_ 


2d do. 


20 


, 18 


<< 


Jones, Albert N., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


, 19 


Private, 


Adams, Henry G , . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


, 19 


<« 


Banks, Everett W., . 


_ 


2d do. 


20 


,20 


<« 


Domey, Israel F., . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


,20 


<( 


Dockendorff, R. W., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


<i 


Desmarais, John, 


_ 


2d do. 


20 


,21 


<« 


Fernald, Henry B., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<« 


Foley, Allen, . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


21 


<( 


Foley, Harry, . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


20 


«< 


Golbert, William I., 


_ 


2d do. 


20 


20 


«< 


Howard, Emory G., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


<< 


Leduc, Joseph ij., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


1£ 


<< 


Normandine, Alfred, 


- 


2d do. 


20 


22 


<t 


Neal, Everett H., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


«< 


Readio, Walter H., . 


6th Mass., F, 


2d do. 


19 


20 


«« 


Rowles, Clarence A., 


6th Mass., F, 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Smith, Ralph C, 


- 


2d do. 


18 


22 


<« 


Schwartz, Ardeen, . 


6th Mass., F, 


2d do. 


19 


19 


<< 


Stevens, John L., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


<« 


Winot, David, . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


20 


«« 


Walker, Albert W., . 


- 


2d do. 


22 


22 


<< 


Warren, Charles A., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


<( 


Wheeler, John A., . 


5th Mass., M, 


2d do. 


19 


20 


<< 


Whitcomb, Harry M., 


— 


2d do. 


18 


18 


Corporal, . 


Jones, Fred H., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


17 


Private, 


Blanchett, Louis, 


- 


3d do. 


15 


17 


<« 


Carey, Edward, 


- 


3d do. 


18 


17 


(< 


Dufresne, William G., 


_ 


3d do. 


16 


17 


<( 


Gour, Andrew, . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 


16 


<« 


Howe, Winfred A., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 


17 


<« 


Lee, Clarence V., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 


16 


<< 


Landry, Charles C, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 


15 


<« 


Le Page, S. Wright, 


6th Mass., F, 


3d do. 


16, 


19 


«« 


Meanor, William N., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


«« 


Marshall, Everett S., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 



Sharpshooters, . . . .13 
First class marksmen, . . 4 
Second class marksmen, . . 29 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



11 



57 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 



143 



COMPANY G, SIXTH INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Baker, Edwin G., . 


6th Mass., G, 


s. S 


• » 


47, 49, 47 


Corporal, . 


Dane, Charles A. L., 


6th Mass., G, 


s. s 


•> 


48, 49, 49 


it 


Draper, Charles W., 


- 


s. s 


•» 


46, 47, 42 


Captain, 


Fairweather, William, 


6th Mass., G, 


s. s 


•» 


47, 47, 47 


Private, 


Grenier, Armene H., 


6th Mass., G, 


s. s 


•» 


46, 46, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Heatb, Fred H., . . . 


- 


s.s 


•> 


45, 47, 47 


tt 


Hunton, Fred G., . 


6th Mass., G, 


s. s 


• > 


46, 48, 47 


<« 


Dodge, Frank, . 


6th Mass., G, 


1st Class, 


42, 42, - 


Lieutenant, 


Durrell, Pearl T , . 


6th Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Private, 


Gove, James E., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 44, - 


Lieutenant, 


Howard, George S., . 


6th Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


Private, 


Blacktin, Howard W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


Corporal, . 


Brock, George, 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


23 


21 


Private, 


Butters, George W. A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


<< 


Carlson, Robert, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


21 


Corporal, . 


Chase, Walter R., . 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


Private, 


Delmore, John A , . 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


22 


23 


«( 


Fairfield, J. Fred, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22 


22 


Sergeant, . 


Fisher, Napoleon E., 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


Private, 


Fawcett, Powell, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


«« 


Foss, George F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


« 


Grenier, George E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


<« 


Harrington, Michael H., . 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Hulslander, John, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


t't 


Hunt, William F., . 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


' tt 


Johnson, Charles C, 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


a 


Keville, Peter, . 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


(< 


Langell, William H., 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Lussier, Adelarde, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


<( 


Maguire, John J., . 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


20 


21 


(< 


Meehan, Joseph, 


6th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


a 


Miller, Henry E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


tt 


Needham, Joseph, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


tt 


Taylor, Guy R , 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


20 


tt 


Raciott, Arthur A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22 


22 


a 


Whittier, Arthur F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


19 


Sergeant, . 


Prescott, William H., 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


18 


20 


Private, 


Brimejion, Caleb, 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


18 


<< 


Coburn, Joseph, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 


<« 


Hicks, George N., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 


<< 


Kelley, Thomas L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


19 


a 


Lambert Charles, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


tt 


Le Clair, Edmund, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


18 


tt 


O'Brien, Charles, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


tt 


Reay, Thomas, 


6th Mass., G, 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


it 


Sweeney, James, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


a 


Thissell, Fred B., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 


a 


Tully, James, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


18 


a 


Weeks, Forest T., . 


6th Mass., G, 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


tt 


Bobilee, Alphonse J., 


- 


1st 


do. 


- 


Corporal, . 


Brackley, Ralph A., 


6th Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


- 


it 


Caldwell, John A., . 


6th Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Gannon, John, . 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


_ 


<< 


Grenier, John, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


_ 


Bugler, 


Jaques, William C, 


6th Mass., 
N. C. S. 


S.S 


•> 


- 


Private, 


Jones, Frederick P., 


_ 


1st Class, 


_ 


tt 


Le Clair, Frank R, . 


- 


1st 


do. 


_ 


a 


Moussette, George E., 


— 


2d 


do. 


- 



Sharpshooters, .... 8 
First class marksmen, . . 9 
Second class marksmen, . . 29 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



12 



58 



144: 



ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY H, SIXTH INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Captain, 


Barnstead, George R., 


6th Mass., H, 


S. S 


•5 


50, 49, 44 


Lieutenant, 


Stewart, Duncan M., 


6th Mass., H, 


s. s 


•> 


50, 46, 45 


Sergeant, . 


Ireland, T. Arthur, . 


- 


s. s 


•> 


49, 46, 42 


<< 


Nutting, John EL, . 


6th Mass., H, 


s. s 


'» 


50, 48, 44 


(c 


Doucette, Joseph H., 


- 


s. s 


•> 


48, 46, 42 


<( 


Lane, Frank H., 


- 


s. s 


•5 


44, 46, 43 


Private, 


Delano, Ethan L., . 


- 


s. s 


•> 


47, 46, 42 


(( 


Marden, William C, 


- 


s. s 


•, 


46, 48, 45 


• • 


Newhall, Arthur N., 


6th Mass., H, 


s. s 


•5 


49, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, . 


Desmond, William D., . 


6th Mass., H, 


1st Class, 


45,43, - 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Kelley, Frederick, . 


6th Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


42, 42, - 


Corporal, . 


Ames, Oliver E., 


- 


1st 


do. 


47,42, - 


tt 


Draper, Clifford L., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


46,43, - 


it 


Harris, Alien J., 


8th Mass., K, 


1st 


do. 


46,45, - 


<< 


Keene, Waiter S., Jr., 


- 


1st 


do. 


45,46, - 


Private, 


Buck, Alfred L., 


- 


1st 


do. 


45, 42, - 


a 


Drown, Lute C, 


- 


1st 


do. 


45,42, - 


tt 


Gove, William B., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


45,42, - 


a 


Jaquith, John T., . . 


- 


1st 


do. 


43,42, - 


n 


Mitchell, Frank S., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


47,42, - 


Lieutenant, 


Wiggin, Samuel F., 


6th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


Corporal, . 


Camerlin, Henry G., 


6th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


22 


22 


n 


Turner, Gerald E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


23 


22 


Musician, . 


Wilkins, Frank A., . 


6th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


20 


19 


Private, 


Bennett, Charles J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


19 


t< 


Brown, Charles E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


20 


it 


Bunce, J. Herbert, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


it 


Carr, Albert H., 


6th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


22 


21 


(i 


Clesbee, Julius A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


(( 


Copp, Joseph, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


(( 


Conley, James H.; . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


tt 


Emerson, George R., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


18 


It 


Fay, William T., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


it 


Gorham, Walter, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


It 


Harris, Charles H. S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


it 


McEIhiney, Eldon E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


(i 


Miller, Frank 0., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


(( 


Miller, George E., Jr., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


19 


(( 


Milier, Howard L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


< i 


Murphy, George, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


(( 


Newhall, Moody, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


19 


it 


Orcutt, Clarence W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


(i 


Pearson, Alfred B., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22 


22 


it 


Rendall, George, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


18 


(( 


Twombly, William A., Jr. 


> 


2d 


do. 


24 


22 


a 


Turner, Frederick D., 




2d 


do. 


19 


19 


a 


Smith, Frank L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


c( 


Walker, Lawrence T., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


c< 


Hinckcliffe, Arthur, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 


<( 


King, Moses, Jr., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


15 


a 


Moody, Fred D., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18 


15 


<< 


Muse, William, 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


17 


<« 


Walfenden, Harry, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


<< 


Lafoe, Lee Allen, 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


«< 


Ward, Arthur L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 



Sharpshooters, . 


. 9 


Third class marksmen, 


5 


First class marksmen, 


. 11 


Total, .... 


. —55 


Second class marksmen, . 


. 30 







1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



145 



COMPANY I, SIXTH INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Kegt. and Co. 








Private, 


Tolman, James H., . 


6th Mass., I, 


D. M., 


47, 48, 46 


«< 


Carson, Patrick F., . 


- 


S. S 


•» 


48, 47, 45 


Musician, . 


Foreman, Charles F., 


6th Mass., I, 


s. s 


•i 


46, 47, 42 


Lieutenant, 


Hagerty, John W., . 


6th Mass., I, 


s. s 


•> 


48, 49, 44 


Corporal, . 


Ireland, Frank F., . 


6th Mass., I, 


s. s 


-> 


47, 46, 42 


Captain, 


Jackson, Francis T., 


6th Mass., I, 


s. s 


, 


48, 48, 46 


Private, 


Lyons, Thomas F., . 


6th Mass., I, 


s. s 


■j 


44, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


McHugh, Patrick F., 


- 


s. s 


•» 


44, 46, 42 


Private, 


Saunders, Harry G., 


6th Mass., I, 


s. s 


«, 


45, 47, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Sohier, Walter, 


6th Mass., I, 


s. s 




44, 46, 44 


Private, 


Toohey, Frank P., . 


- 


s. s 


• > 


46, 46, 43 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Worthley, Harry R., 


6th Mass., I, 


s. s 


•» 


46, 46, 45 


Private, 


Brown, William F., 


_ 


1st Class, 


43,42, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Byron, J. William, . 


6th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


45, 45, - 


Sergeant, . 


Dakin, Alberton L., 


6th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


46, 42, - 


Private, 


Hanson, Albion J., . 


6th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


(< 


Miner, Charles E., . 


6th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


42,44, - 


Corporal, . 


Peterson, Ralph B., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


Private, 


Smith, Theodore L., 


6th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


k 


Bamforth, Charles H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


23,22 


(< 


Calkins, Alonzo T., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


(< 


Craig, John W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Dakin, Ralph E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Daniels, Ernest N., . 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Derby, Fred B., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Emerson, William F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<• 


Flannery, Edward W., . 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<t 


Flannery, Michael J., 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Ford, Clement R., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


a 


Garfield, George W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


<< 


Hennessey, William J., . 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


19,22 


Sergeant, . 


Hill, William H., . 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


Private, 


Jones, Daniel W., . 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


Corporal, . 


Kelleher, John J., . 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Libby, Harry F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


<« 


Losaw, Alexander J., 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Loughlin, William J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Murray, Joseph D., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


<« 


O'Connell, Dennis J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


Corporal, . 


Olsen, John, 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


a 


Owen, Herbert W., . 


6th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


Private, 


Peterson, Thomas, . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


23, 19 




< 


Powers, Michael D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 




< 


Underwood, Moses F., . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 




< 


Willis, Albert E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 




c 


Cantwell, James P., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 




t 


Kelley, Charles J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 




i 


Magurn, Francis C, 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 17 




< 


McCallar, Howard V., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 




i 


McCallar, J. Donald, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 




< 


Peterson, Peter C, . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 




< 


Powers, Martin W., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 




i 


Saunders, Arthur A., 


. - 


3d 


do. 


15,15 




i 


Stiles, Frank L., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,21 




i 


McKinnon, Francis, 


_ 


3d 


do. 




«< 


McHugh, Michael J., 


— 


2d 


do. 


- 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters 11 

First class marksmen, . . 7 

Second class marksmen, . . 27 



Third class marksmen. 
Unqualified member, 
Total, . 



10 
1 

— 57 



146 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



COMPANY K, SIXTH INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








1st Sergeant, 


Smith, Herbert L., . 


1st Mass., C, 


D. 


M., 


50, 50, 44 


Captain, 


Hathaway, Harry L., 


- 


1st Class, 


43,43, - 


Corporal, . 


Carpenter, William, . 


- 


1st 


do. 


45,44, - 


Private, 


Mish, William H., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


45, 45, - 


Sergeant, . 


Ware, Ernest S , 


6th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


K 


Prince, William H., . 


■ - 


2d 


do. 


22,21 


Corporal, . 


Baker, Edwin C, 


6th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


<< 


Bouchard, Louis, 


- 


2d 


do. 


22, 18 


a 


Kelly, Joseph L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<« 


Marble, Charles S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Baker, Harry L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 1$ 


M i 


Brigham, Ralph H., 


2d Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


<< 


Delarge, John B., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


it 


Plimpton, Ellsworth F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


M 


Riedel, Richard C, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


(( 


Sanders, James 0., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Paquin, Alexander, . 


6th Mass., K, 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


Private, 


Bird, Napoleon, 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,17 


*' . . 


Boyle, J. Edward, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


" . . 


Dodge, Fred A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


" . . 


Durosher, Arthur, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


20, 17 


" . . 


Fontaine, Alpha, 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 16 


" , . 


Freeman, Edwin S., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


" . , 


Galipeau, Omer, 


6th Mass., K, 


3d 


do. 


20, 15 


*' . . 


Gancher, Wilfred, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


" . , 


Giroux, Narcisse D., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


" . . 


Hawkinsbn, John A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


" . . 


Lafrenier, Ephriem, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


" . . 


Lachapelle, Joseph D., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 17 


" . . 


McGrail, William F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


** . , 


McGrath, Walter T., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


<k . . 


Robinson, Harry M., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


" . . 


Wright, Herman, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


" . . 


Young, Arthur E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


19, 16 


" . . 


Bourdeau, Wilfred, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


_ 


" . . 


Garceau, Alfred, 


- 


2d 


do. 


_ 


" . . 


Lescarbeau, Orgelas, 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


" . . 


Mason, David J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


• 


Peterson, John E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 
First class marksmen, . . 3 
Second class marksmen, . . 14 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



21 
19 
— 58 



COMPANY L, SIXTH INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 


Braxton, G. W., 


6th Mass., L, 


S. S., 


48, 48, 45 


Sergeant, . 


Carter, W. E., Jr., . 


6th Mass., L, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 45 


1st Sergeant, 


Holmes, J. G., . 


6th Mass., L, 


s. s., 


49, 50, 46 


Musician, . 


Moore, J. H , . 


6th Mass., L, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


Private, 


Gould, H. R., . 


- 


1st Class, 


44, 42, - 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Pryor, J. H., . 


6th Mass., L, 


1st do. 


43, 42, - 


Private, 


Washington, W. S., 


6th Mass., L, 


1st do. 


43,44, - 


Sergeant, . 


Watson, G. W., 


6th Mass., L, 


1st do. 


43, 42, - 


Corporal, . 


Wheaton, G. H., . 


- 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


Private, . . 


Williams, H. H., . 


10th U. S. 
Cav., E. 


1st do. 


45, 45, - 


«< 


Ball, C. H., . 


6th Mass., L, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Bassett, W. A., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



147 



COMPANY L, SIXTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Sergeant, . 


Chandler, C. F., 


6th Mass., L, 


2d Class, 


19, 18 


Private, 


DeWenst, W. L. H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


Ii 


Dunbar, L. E., . 


6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


11 


Floyd, G. W., . 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19 


19 


it 


Freeman, U. G.. 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19 


18. 


II 


Grandison, W. T., 




- 


2d 


do. 


20 


20 


Corporal, . 


Gray, H. J., Jr., 




- 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


Private, 


Harvey, J., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


t< 


Jones, G. W., . 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


Corporal, . 


Jordan, A. E., . 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


23 


19 


Private, 


Jordan, W. H., 




- 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


II 


Ligon, J. B., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


18 


a 


Maynard, C. L , 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


20 


19 


<< 


Moseby, T., 




- 


2d 


do. 


19 


19 


i< 


Murray, J. B., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


20 


18 


li 


Pereira, G., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


<« 


Phillips, R. L., . 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


23 


22 


(< 


Sampson, J. A., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


Corporal, . 


Seamon, G. F., 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


Private, 


Stewart, A. B., 




- 


2d 


do. 


20 


18 


it 


Stewart, L. A., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


it 


Thomas, F., 




- 


2d 


do. 


21 


21 


<( 


Twist, J. P., . 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


it 


Wilson, W. H., 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


20 


18 


ii 


Winheld, P. J., 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19 


18 


Corporal, . 


Young, R. G., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


24 


22 


Private, 


Aiken, R. A., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


ii 


Allen, G. W., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


17 


16 


ii 


Foster, C. E., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


Corporal, . 


Gaskins, A. H., 




6th Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


17 


16 


Private, 


Griffin, R. J., . 




6th Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


ii 


Hall, H. A., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


ii 


Harris, J. E., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


17 


15 


it 


Hazel, L. H., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


21 


16 


i< 


Mitchell, A. A., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


ii 


Reid, W. R., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


ii 


Roberts, J. B., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16, 


15 


(< 


Sandifer, L., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


ii 


Taylor, J. P., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


ii 


Wheeler, C. E., 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


it 


Whiting, R. L., 




- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


<i 


Allen, W. S , . 




- 


3d 


do. 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Carpenter, W. S., 




6th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Sidney, J. D , . 




6th Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Gould, W. B., Jr., . 




6th Mass., L, 


1st 


do. 


_ 


Captain, 


Williams, W. J., 




6th Mass., L, 


1st 


do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen, 



29 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



17 

— 58 



COMPANY M, SIXTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Barrett, John F., 


6th Mass., M, 


D. M., 


45, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Kimball, Charles H., 


6th Mass., M, 


S. S., 


45, 49, 48 


ii 


Donohue, Stanley, . 


6th Mass., M, 


S. s., 


44, 46, 42 


1st Sergeant, 


Furse, James, . 


6th Mass., M, 


S. S., 


45, 46, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Pond, William G., . 


- 


1st Class, 


42,43, - 


Corporal, . 


Curtiss, Fred H., 


— 


1st do. 


42,43, - 



148 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY M, SIXTH INFANTRY- Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private , 


Curley, William E., 


_ 


1st Class, 


42,45, - 


(< 


Hunter, Obal K., 


- 


1st 


do. 


43, 43, - 


K 


King, George E., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Bennett, Edwin J. R., 


6th Mass., M, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Wilcox, George A., . 


6th Mass., M, 


2d 


do. 


21,23 


(< 


Dewing, Charles E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


Corporal, . 


Gardner, John J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


(< 


Little, Fred S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,22 


<< 


Mather, Frank L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Nolan, Martin S., . 


8th Mass.,D, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Musician, . 


McKenzie, John A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Adams, Jesse B., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<« 


Adams, Eugene E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 20 


«< 


Arrand, David K., . 


6th Mass., M, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Bent, George W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


<« 


Carpenter, David T., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<( 


Draper, Ernest W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


«< 


Droney, Henry, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


M 


Hagar, Harry L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


«( 


Lyons, John, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 • 


<( 


McMurphy, Paul, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,22 


<( m m 


Paine, Leroy H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


it 


Rising, Harry A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


(« 


Sanborn, Frank H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


(( 


Shean, George C. C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


«( 


Struthers, William J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


{« 


Tucker, Harry, 


- , 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Shortall, Thomas F , 


1st Conn., F, 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


Private, 


Adams, Chester R., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<< 


Archer, Richard B., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


(C 


Burns, Manville J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(« 


Cabone, Anthony, . 


6th Mass., M, 


3d 


do. 


15. 16 


(i 


Clark, William E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«( 


Cox, James, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(« m 


Desmond, William, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


it 


Flanders, Frank R., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


M 


Fullum, John P., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(( 


Jennis, Joseph, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<« 


Killion, James E., Jr., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


M 


Leggee, James E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


« 


Leggee, Harvey, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(< 


Malinquist, Charles, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


<< 


Mathews, Elmer J., 


3d Conn., M, 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(( 


McMahon, Charles, . 


6th Mass., M, 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


«< 


Moore, Frank E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


<< 


Oleson, Erick, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<( 


O'Donnell, Frank J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


M 


Philpot, Fred H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


« 


Phillips, William E., Jr., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


« 


Smith, Henrv L., 


6th Mass., M, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


«( 


Winchell, Elvin D., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


1( 


Whidden, Leroy, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


«( 


Bickford, J. Russell, 


- 


S. S 




- 


(( 


Home, James T., 


- 


2d Class, 


— 



Distinguished marksman, . 1 

Sharpshooters, .... 4 
First class marksmen, . . 5 



Second class marksmen, . . 25 
Third class marksmen, . . 25 
Total — 60 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



149 



FIELD AND STAFF, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 






Bank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Lieutenant, 


De Sousa, Francisco A., . 


8th M, E & T, 


2d Class, 


18,20 


Lieut. Colonel, . 


Bailey, Edwin M., . 


8th Mass., 
Field. 


S. S., 


- 


Captain, 


Barr, James C, 


- 


1st Class, 


_ 


cii 


Bond, Stephen N., . 


8th Mass., K, 


S. S , 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Chase, A. Preston, . 


8th Mass., K, 


S. S., 


- 


Sergt. Major, 


Cochrane, A. Lynde, 


- 


2d Class, 


- 


Captain, 


Craig, J. Hally, 


8th Mass., L, 


S. S., 


- 


Major, 


Eldredge, Edward H., . 


8th Mass., 
Field. 


1st Class, 


- 


<« 


Graves, Frank A., . 


8th Mass., 
Field. 


1st do. 


- 


Col. Sergeant, . 


Handley, Albert L., . 


8th Mass., E, 


2d do. 


- 


Major, 


Jenkins, Thomas L., 


8th Mass., 
Staff. 


2d do. 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Langdon, George W., 


8th Mass., A, 


S. S., 


_ 


Captain, 


Logan, Frank P. T., 


8th Mass., 
Staff. 


2d Class, 


- 


Col. Sergeant, . 


Marston, William F., 


8th Mass., G, 


S. S., 


_ 


Lieutenant, 


Mclsaacs, Charles M., 


8th Mass., G, 


S. S., 


_ 


Com. Sergeant, . 


Newhall, Benjamin S., 


- 


2d Class, 


_ 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Newhall, Charles H., 


8th Mass., I, 


2d do. 


_ 


Colonel, 


Pew, William A., Jr., 


8th Mass., 
Field. 


S. S., 


- 


Major, 


Stopford, William, . 


8th Mass. , 
Field. 


1st Class, 


- 


Drum Major, 


Thomas, William H., 


8th Mass., 
N. C.S. 


S. S., 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Whitten, Herbert W., 


8th Mass., M, 


S. S., 


- 



Sharpshooters, . . . .10 
First class marksmen, . . 4 
Second class marksmen, . . 7 



30 



COMPANY A, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 
1st Sergeant 

Sergeant, 

«c 


> • 

• 


Corporal, 

Priva/e, 

it 


• 


Lieutenant, 
Corporal, 


• 


Bugler, 
Private, 


• 


<t 


• 


<( 




(< 




a 


. 


(< 


• 


«< 




(« 


• 



Perkins, A. G., 
Erickson, John O., . 
Hay, Frederick J., . 
O'Connor, Patrick J., 
Knight, William, 
Barrett, Joseph J., . 
Flagg, Joseph G., . 
Thurlow, Lawrence B., 
Shepard, Ralph L., . 
Atkinson, Wesley C, 
Poore, Herbert L., . 
Dickie, David C, 
Bolser, Herbert W., . 
Guerette, Joseph, 
Hinkson, Harry F., . 
Moses, Arthur C, . 
Pond, Howard A. S., 
Stover, Ernest B., . 
Baron, Henry, . 
Currier, Levi T., 
Campbell, William H., 
Canning, Charles H., 
Dart, George A., 



8th Mass., A, 
8th Mass., A, 
8th Mass., A, 

8th Mass., A, 

8th Mass., A, 
8th Mass., A, 



U. S. M , 



S.S., 

s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 

1st Class, 
2d do. 



2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



46, 47, 44 
46, 46, 44 
44, 46, 44 
44, 46, 44 

44, 46, 44 

45, 46, 44 

44, 48, 43 

45, 46, 42 
42,43, - 

18, 18 

18, 18 
18,18 
20,20 

19, 19 
21, 19 
19,20 
19,21 
20,18 

15, 15 

16, 18 

15, 16 

16, 15 
15, 15 



150 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY A, EIGHTH INFANTRY- Concluded- 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Private, 



Lieutenant, 
Q. M. Sergeant, 
Sergeant, . 



Eaton, Lester D., 
Harris, Howard D., . 
Hoyt, Charles H., . 
Little, George H., 
Murray, William, . 
McDonald. Francis S., 
Ordway, Herbert L., 
Pearson, Alfred, Jr., 
Sullivan, John F., . 
Miller, Edward, 
Hodgkins. George E., 
Dickie, William A., . 



8th Mass., A, 



3d Class, 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


S. S 




s. s 




s. s 


•» 



15, 15 
18, 16 
18, 15 

16, 15 
16,17 
15, 15 

17, 17 
20, 15 
15, 18 



Sharpshooters, . . . .11 
First class marksman, . . 1 
Second class marksmen, . . 9 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



14 
17 

— 52 



COMPANY B, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Sweetser, E. Leroy, . 


5th Mass., E, 


S. S 


•> 


47, 46, 45 


1st Sergeant, 


Brown, Walter E., . 


- 


s. e 


•> 


48, 48, 43 


Private, 


Leslie, Pearl A., 


8th Mass., F, 


s. s 


•» 


47, 47, 44 


Lieutenant, 


Hillman, Charles H., 


- 


1st Class, 


44,42, - 


Sergeant, . 


McFarland, Herbert J., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


44,43, - 


«« 


Woods, Alton H., . 


5th Mass., L, 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Corporal, . 


Sawin, Lewis P., 


- 


1st 


do. 


47,42, - 


<( 


Clark, Winfield A., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


47,43, - 


Musician, . 


Dunbar, William T., 


- 


1st 


do. 


47,44, - 


Private, 


Austin, Harry A., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


45, 45, - 


a 


Casey, Thomas F., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


44,43, - 


<< 


Chapman, Charles G., 


- 


1st 


do. 


43, 43, - 


(( 


Finegan, Joseph W., 


- 


1st 


do. 


44,43, - 


(( 


Wishman, Herbert G., 


1st Mass., A, 


1st 


do. 


44, 43, - 


Lieutenant, 


Kyle, George A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


Sergeant, . 


Glavin, Leonard F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22, 22 


(t 


McGinniss, Edward M., . 


5th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Whitaker, Winfield H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


<« 


Parker, Theodore 0., 


5th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


18,22 


<« 


Casey, Matthew, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


c< 


Henderson, Edward H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Aberle, William H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Benoit, Urbane C, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 21 


<( 


Burrows, Joseph C., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


<4 


Carder, Joseph A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 20 


(< 


Costello, Alfred J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


u 


Dean, Bayard C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


23,25 


«< 


Degnio, Millard F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


(( 


Hammond, Warren B., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


« 


Holmes, William G., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


<( 


Jones, Russell F , . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Langill, Charles L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Mason, George 0., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


«( 


Newcomb, James L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(( 


Newcomb, Lee W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,19 


a 


Park, George R., 


- 


2d 


do, 


18, 18 


<< 


Pedlar, William H., 


5th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


(i 


Perkins, Percy R., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,24 


CI 


Phelan, Joseph B., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(i 


Phillips, Ernest C, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



151 



COMPANY B, EIGHTH INFANTRY— Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Bank. 


Namk. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Potter, Ira S., . 


— 


2d Class, 


22,23 


<< 


Ryan, Frank J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Scott, John K., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Hanna, George A., . 


5th Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


Corporal, . 


Adams, William B., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


Private, 


Batchelder, Harry G., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


<< 


Boynton, Ernest W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Boynton, Leslie C, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


(< 


Bradford, William T., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


<< 


Bresnahan, Patrick L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


t< 


Bullock, Arthur E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


<< 


Carpenter, Frank M., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,17 


<( 


Crocker, Lawrence F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Crowley, Frank T., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


<( 


Hutchings, Frederick A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Kavanaugh, Fred E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


cc 


McAIeavey, John W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(( 


McNarnara, C. Joseph, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


('< 


Morrison, Stuart J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Stormont, Walter E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


<< 


Tracy, John F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(( 


Tuells, Charles F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,18 


(< 


Woodbury, George S., 


— 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 



Sharpshooters, .... 3 
First class marksmen, . . 11 
Second class marksmen, . . 29 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . . ' . 



20 



63 



COMPANY C, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 
Sergeant, . 
Corporal, . 
Private, 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Corporal, . 
1st Sergeant, 
Q. M. Sergeant, 
Sergeant, 



Corporal, 



Bugler, 

Private, 



Loundsbury. Francis J. 
Bradford, William A., 
B,oss, Henry T., 
Patchett, Wallace J., 
Cutler, Charles H., . 
Stearns, Harry N., . 
Acott, Richard H., . 
Lindh, Edward W., 
Lovering, Harry F., 
Greene, William J., 
Weren, Carl E., 
Cutler, Edmund H., 
Stone, Henry B., 
Hutchinson, Herbert R. 
Cutler, George B., . 
Haley, James W., . 
Adams, Benjamin, . 
Bates, Louie E., 
Berke, Henry J., 
Carr, Richard J., 
Clarke, Joseph, 
Gardner, Joseph A., 
Johnson, Herbert W., 
Jones, Lester H., 
Joyce, Alfred W., . 
Kendall, Harry G., . 
Law, Harry R., 
Lindh, Harris G, . 
McChlerie, William A., 



5th Mass., B, 
5th Mass., G, 

5th Mass., A, 



s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



45, 49, 48 
48, 49, 42 
45, 46, 43 

44, 46, 44 
45,45, - 

45, 43, - 
48,45, - 

18,20 
22,20 
18,20 
19, 18 
19,18 
18,20 
22,21 
19, 18 
18,19 

19, 19 

20, 19 
20,21 

21, 22 
18,18 

18, 18 
18,22 

19, 18 
19, 19 

18, 18 

19, 19 
21, 19 
21, 19 



152 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY C, EIGHTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


Metcalf, Fred C, . 




2d Class, 


18, 18 


M 


Roberts, William H., 


- 


2d do. 


22 


20 


tt 


Sacterre, Hector A., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


it 


Slade, Harry B., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


18 


a 


Stephens, Arthur H. B., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


it 


Stevens, John L., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


<< 


Thompson, Edward S., . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


21 


tt 


Thompson, James W., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


<« 


Thompson, Joseph L., 


- 


2d do. 


22 


22 


a 


Toohy, John J., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


18 


t< 


Zelch, Henry A., 


- 


2d do. 


21 


18 


Corporal, . 


Hales, Albert E., 


- 


3d do. 


16 


15 


<« 


Taylor, William B., 


- 


3d do. 


17 


19 


Private, 


Adams, Frank S., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


16 


«« 


Bustin, Joseph B., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


16 


n 


Chandler, Lewis R., 


- 


3d do. 


16 


15 


«< 


Cronin, Desmond M., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 


<( 


Dickson, George, 


- 


3d do. 


17 


16 


«< 


Dor re, Henry J., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 


(< 


Fosdick, Oliver G., Jr., . 


- 


3d do. 


17 


16 


<i 


Fillebrown, Arthur M., . 


- 


3d do. 


17 


15 


<< 


Hayden, Robert F., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


16 


tt 


Hutchins, DeWitt, . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


,15- 


(< 


Lovett, Arthur L., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


17 


tt 


Lundgren, Ozro P., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


l& 


«( 


Mason, Harry C, . 


- 


3d do. 


17 


15 


<« 


Priest, Fred S., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


(< 


Reed, Edwin C, 


- 


3d do. 


18 


17 


(< 


Sherman, Ernest A., 


- 


3d do. 


17 


18 


M 


Steadman. Ross G., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


17 


(( 


Sullivan, Humphrey P., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


t< 


Taylor, William E. E., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


U 


Wahlstedt, Axel E., 


- 


3d do. 


17 


16 


«( 


Walcott, Kenneth B., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 



Sharpshooters 4 

First class marksmen, . . 3 
Second class marksmen, . . 33 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



23 
— 63 



Captain, 


Hilliker. Charles T.. 


8th Mass., D, 


D. M., 


48, 49, 45 


Lieutenant, 


Cobey, Thomas J., . 


8th Mass., D, 


D. M., 


49, 50, 43 


1st Sergeant, 


Jeffers, Charles J., . 


8th Mass.,D, 


D.M., 


48, 50, 46 


Private, 


Campbell, William M., . 


8th Mass., D, 


D. M., 


49, 50, 48 


Lieutenant, 


Cann, William W , . 


- 


S. S., 


45, 47, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Piper, Edward I., 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


<« 


Johnson, Charles J., 


8th Mass., D, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


Godfrey, Frederic S., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 48, 46 


tt 


Weston, Howard B., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 47, 42 


Private, 


Quigley, John H., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Mitchell, Simmons E., 


8th Mass.,D, 


1st Class, 


43, 46, - 


Corporal, . 


Clark, David H., . 


8th Mass , D, 


1st do. 


45,42, - 


ii 


Garvin, Michael H., 


- 


1st do. 


44,42, - 


Private, 


Armstrong, Arthur R., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,43, - 


(i 


Harryian, Peter, 


- 


1st do. 


42,45, - 


n 


Nicholson, George W., . 


8th Mass.,D, 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


tt 


Smith, George H., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


a 


Stevens, George H., . 


~ 


1st do. 


46,45, - 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



153 



COMPANY D, EIGHTH INFANTRY- Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Williams, Forest E., 




1st Class, 


42, 42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Bacheller, Oscar P., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


Corporal, . 


Pillsbury, Arthur R., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


Bugler, 


Baumgarten, A. F., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19. 


Private, 


Bailey, H. M., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


a 


Danforth, A. H., 




- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


<« 


Forton, Napoleon, 




- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


(< 


Gilliatt, J. W., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


«< 


Hall, G. E M . 




_ 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


<( 


Hegarty, R. B., Jr., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(c 


Lane, P. T., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


«« 


Payne, William, 




_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


(< 


Savory, B. W., 




- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Snow, V. P., . 




- 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


<( 


Tobin, J. J., . 




_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Whelan, J. F., . 




_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


De Lue, George H., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Private, 


Butt, A. J., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


u 


Durney, W. A., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


n 


Eaton, N. J., . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«( 


Knox, James A., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 18 


<( 


Leadbetter, R. W., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(« 


Mclnerney, M. A., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(( 


Nason, H. F, . 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Newhall, F. B., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


«« 


Nunan, D. G., . 




7th U S. Inf., 
K. 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


(( 


Russell, W. S., 




3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(( 


Sargeant, P. A., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


«« 


Tizzard, W. J., 




- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


«( 


Warren, C. J. C, 




_ 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


Corporal, . 


Annable, George I., 




- 


2d 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Eager, A. P. J., 




- 


3d 


do. 


- 


'< 


Ober, F. H., . 




8th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


- 


«« 


Robbins, W. E., 




~ 


3d 


do. 


• — 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 4 

Sharpshooters, .... 6 

First class marksmen, . . 10 

Second class marksmen, . . 16 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



16 
7 
— 59 



COMPANY E, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Sergeant, . 


Philpot, William G., 




1st Class, 


42, 42, - 


Corporal, . 


Raymond, Irving L., 


- 


1st do. 


44,42, - 


Lieutenant, 


Burnham, Charles B., 


_ 


2d do. 


21,22 


<( 


Whiting, Ralph S, . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Schade, Harry D., . 


8th Mass., E, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Wilson, Henry F., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,18 


<« 


Farrell, David E., . 


8th Mass.,E, 


2d do. 


21,21 


Corporal, . 


Kelley, Albert H., . 


- 


2d do. 


22,22 


«« 


Torst. Axel G., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Private, 


Ask, Henry E. A., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


<< 


Clayton, George H., 


- 


2d do. 


21, 19 


(i 


Clough, Arthur M., . 


- 


2d do. 


21,19 


<« 


Collier, Frank P., . 


_• 


2d do. 


21,20 


«< 


Foster, Arthur T., . 


- 


2d do. 


21,21 


«< 


Gorten, Ernest O., . 


- 


2d do. 


• 22, 21 


«« 


Holden, Wilbur J., . 


— 


2d do. 


18, 18 



154: ADJUTANT GEKEKAL'S REPOET. [Jan. 



COMPANY E, EIGHTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Hurlburt, Albert W., 




2d Class, 


21,20 


<( 


McEvoy, Frank R., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


«< 


McPherson, D. John, 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 18 


<( 


Pyne, Walter P., 


_ 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


« 


Colson, Llewellyn, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


«< 


Foss, Charles C, 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


<< 


Hawkes, John,. 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Hunt, Burt L, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,15 


<i 


Jenkins, Lemuel R., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


17,18 


<< 


Millett, Henry F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Paul, Arthur N., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


«( 


Pepper, Horace M., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,18 


it 


Rogers, Arthur W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


«« 


Snow, Fred M., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


(< 


Williams, James L., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


Corporal, . 


Whelpley, Edgar J., 


8th Mass., C, 


S. S 


•i 


- 


<< 


Noble, Shirley C, . 


8th Mass., E, 


1st Class, 


- 


Private, 


Munsey, Roy H., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


- 


1st Sergeant, 


Stone, Warren E., . 


8th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Magner, James M., . 


8th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Musician, . 


Sweetman, William D., . 


8th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Maurais, Wilfred A., 


8th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


- 


<( 


Goodwin, William C, 


— 


3d 


do. 


— 


Sharpshooter, 


. 1 


Third class mark 


smen 


> • 


. 12 


First class ma 


rksmen, . . 4 


Unqualified mem 


bers, 


. 


. 13 


Second class r 


narksmen, . . 22 


Total, . 


• 


• 


. —52 



COMPANY F, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Private, 
Corporal, . 
Captain, 

Q. M. Sergeant, 
Sergeant, . 
1st Sergeant, 
Private, 



Lieutenant, 
Private, 

a 

Corporal, 
Private, 

a 

Corporal, 
Sergeant, 

n 

Private, 

a 

Corporal, 
Private, 



Sergeant, 
Private, 



Musician, 



Beauchamp, Edmund, 
Griffin, Bertram S., . 
Jewell, David E., 

Sleeper, Harry E., . 
Short, Harry H., 
Smith, George P., . 
Thompson, Lester E., 
Austin, Herbert, 
Campbell, Harry B., 
Jellison, Charles E., 
McLeod, Angus, 
Wentworth, George E. 
Warren, Samuel M., 
Atwood, Fred H , . 
Brian, Salathael W., 
Deane, Charles H., . 
Hutchinson, Albert E., 
Holt, Cyrus E., 
Hardy, Charles W M 
Love joy, Fred S., . 
Peaslee, Roy E., 
Strout, Harry W., . 
Severance, Herbert, . 
Tilton, Herbert S., . 
Whittier, Fred H., . 
Coffin, Arthur H., . 
Cook, Albert H., 
Dubois, Napoleon, . 



8th Mass., F 

and K. 
8th Mass., F, 
8th Mass., F, 



8th Mass., F, 
8th Mass., F, 



8th Mass., F, 



S. s 




s. s 




s. s 


•> 


s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 



44, 46, 46 
44, 46, 42 
44, 47, 42 

44, 46, 48 

44, 46, 48 

45, 47, 47 
44, 46, 45 

42.43, - 

43.44, - 
45,47, - 
42,43, - 
42,43, - 
42,42, - 

20,19 
21,23 
20,21 
18,18 
20, 18 

18, 18 

19, 19 
19,18 
20,21 
18, 18 
20,21 
20,20 
16, 15 
16, 15 
18, 16 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



155 



COMPANY F, EIGHTH INFANTRY- Concluded. 



Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 

Corporal, 

Private, 
<< 

<« 

(< 
<( 

Corporal, 

Private, 
<< 

<( 
Lieutenant, 


• 


Davis, Charles H., . 
Desmond, John A., . 
Lucier, Harry J., 
La Free, Peter N., . 
Randall, Bert L., 
Short, George L., No. 2, . 
Wentworth, Harris M., . 
Bilodeau, Philip P , 
Coombs, Arthur C, 
Guertin, Edward P., 
Short, George L., No. 1, . 
Whittier, David F., . 


8th Mass., F, 

8th Mass., F, 
- 

8th Mass., F, 

8th Mass., F 
andK. 


3d Class, 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
2d do. 
3d do. 
2d do. 
2d do. 
1st do. 


17, 15 
17,19 
17,17 
19, 16 
16, 16 
15, 16 
16,17 



Sharpshooters, .... 7 
First class marksmen, . . 7 
Second class marksmen, . . 15 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



11 
3 
— 43 



COMPANY G, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Private, 



1st Sergeant 

Corporal, 

Private, 

Lieutenant, 

Musician, 

Corporal, 



Private, 



Sergeant, 
Corporal, 
Private, 



Alderman, Merit P., 
Dunbar, Ernest W., 
Dunbar, Fred R , 
Ehler, Ernest A., 
Howe, Ernest, . 
Johnson, Frank W., 
Kin cade, Gerard M., 
Parker, John E , 
Phalen, James E., . 
Pine, Angus, . 
Abbott, Thomas P., 
Allen, Frank A., 
Ballou, Edward P., . 
Bennett, George, 
Clark, Walter H., . 
Collins, Charles A., . 
Collins, Charles P., . 
Dier, Julius F., 
Davis, Horace W., . 
Dunbar, Gorden W., 
Eaton, Robert L., . 
Frasier, Joseph P., . 
Greenleaf, Walter, . 
Hallett, William L., 
Johnson, William J., 
Keefe, James S., 
Linnehan, Cornelius J., 
Lord, Eugene R., 
Lufkins, John J., 
McKay, James B , . 
McPhee, Fred E., . 
Morong, John H., . 
O'Brien, Michael J., 
O'Malley, Joseph, . 
O'Neil, Simon A., . 
Parker, Daniel F., . 
Parsons, Herman A., 
Pine, Archibald, 
Powers, Edward K., 



- 


S. S., 


47, 46, 47 


- 


S. S., 


48, 48, 47 


- 


S. S., 


47, 48, 46 


8th Mass., G, 


S. S., 


45, 47, 46 


- 


S. S., 


45, 46, 46 


- 


S.S., 


45, 46, 46 


_ 


S. s., 


46, 47, 46 


8th Mass., G, 


s. s., 


48, 47, 46 


- 


S. 8., 


45, 47, 48 


- 


s. s., 


46, 49, 46 


- 


2d Class, 


19, 18 


8th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


20, 19 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


8th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


19, 19 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


- 


2d do. 


20,19 


8th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


- 


2d do. 


19,19 


- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


- 


2d do. 


22,21 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


8th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


19, 18 



156" ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY G, EIGHTH INFANTRY- Concluded. 







Service in U. 8. 










Volunteers, 




Scores. 


Rank. 


Name. 

i 


1898. 
Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


1901. 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Radcliffe, John A., 




2d Class, 


21,21 


Private, 


Rogers, Guy H., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Spates, Arthur N., . 


8th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


20, 19 


Private, 


Thomas, Charles P., 


- 


2d do. 


20, 18 


<( 


Thomas, Walter R., 


8th Mass., G, 


2d do. 


19, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Veno, Gilbert S., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Private, 


Wall, Ulric V., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


«« 


White, Walter W., . 


_ 


2d do. 


19, 19 


« 


Anderson, Everett A., 


- 


3d do. 


- 


<« 


Burns, John M., 


8th Mass., G, 


1st do. 


- 


Captain, 


Horton, Edward J., 


8th Mass., G, 


S. S., 


- 


Private, 


Jacobs, Thomas W., 


8th Mass., G, 


s. s., 


- 


Lieutenant, 


McDonald, Hugh M., 


8th Mass., G, 


1st Class, 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Shrinert, Arthur L., 


- 


S. S., 


- 


Private, 


Wilkins, George A., 


8th Mass., G, 


2d Class. 


- 


Corporal, . 


Banks, John J., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 


Private, 


Beaton, Alexander J., 


- 


3d do. 


15,15 


<( 


Corliss, George H., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


«< 


Plow, Albert, . 


- 


3d do. ■ 


15, 16 


(< 


Silva, Joseph, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<« 


Strangman, Herbert T., . 


- 


3d do. 


17,16 


<< 


Wilkinson, Clarence G., . 


— 


3d do. 


15, 15 



Sharpshooters, . . . .13 
First class marksmen, . . 2 
Second class marksmen, . . 38 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



2 
— 63 



COMPANY H, EIGHTH INFANTRY 



Private, 


Craig, Robert A., 


8th Mass., B, 


S. S 


■> 


46, 46, 47 


Corporal, . 


Fuller, J. Irving, 


8th Mass.,H, 


S. s 


■> 


44, 46, 46 


Sergeant, . 


Hoberg, Frank A., . 


8th Mass., H, 


s. s 


•> 


45, 46, 47 


Captain, 


Jewett, George N., . 


8th Mass.,H, 


s. s 


■j 


45, 46, 47 


1st Sergeant, 


Peach, Henry S , 


8th Mass., C, 


s. s 


•» 


45, 46, 46 


Lieutenant, 


White, Ernest C, . 


8th Mass.,H, 


s. s 


•> 


45, 46, 46 


Private, 


Winn, Edwin W., . 


- 


s. s 


M 


44, 47, 47 


Corporal, . 


Crowell, William A., 


- 


1st Class, 


43,44, - 


Sergeant, . 


Curwen, James H., . 


8th Mass., C, 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Private, 


Dickey, Arthur L., . 


8th Mass.,H, 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


Corporal, . 


Larrabee, Ernest E., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


Private, 


McGarrell, Edward D., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


Musician, . 


Osborne, Edward C, 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


Private, 


Pariseau, Joseph A., 


- 


1st 


do. 


43,43, - 


<< 


Pierce, Lorenzo W., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,46, - 


(< 


Rice, Ernest, . 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


Lieutenant, 


Robinson. Frank W., 


8th Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


43,43, - 


Private, 


Smallie, Herbert C, 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


<< 


Yeaton, Stephen, 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,45, - 


Sergeant, . 


Bartlett, John P., 


8th Mass., F, 


2d 


do. 


22,21 


Private, 


Cotter, Garrett E., . 


8th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Cronin, John A., 


8th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Gray, Thomas A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


(< 


Hoberg, William P., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Hart, Edward H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


Corporal, . 


Hurley, John J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


Private, 


Jones, Warren F., . 


8th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Lasker, Charles L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Lebel, Octave, . 


8th Mass., K, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<« 


Mallard, Herbert T., 


8th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



157 



COMPANY H, EIGHTH INFANTRY- Concluded. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Private, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 



Corporal, 
Private, 



McLaughlin, John J., 
Milliken, Frank S , . 
Molonson, Maurice F., 
Moreland, George F., 
Moreland, Harry A., 
Mulligan, John, 
Peabody, Wilbur H., 
Reese, Arthur H , . 
Ryno, Allen J., 
Somes, Arthur C, . 
Walsh, Austin J., . 
Carr, Martin E., 
Copeland, Henry P., 
Dooley, Joseph J., . 
Dow, Walter E., 
Dullea, Daniel F., . 
Ferguson, Fred E., . 
Gouthier, Edward, . 
Heffernan, Harry S , 
Larrabee, Harris M., 
Murray, James G., . 
St. Pierre, S. Adelard S., 
Thibeault, Alfred J , 
Webber, Fred C, 
Whelton, John J., 
White, Frank J., 
Caisse, Maxime J., 
Griffin, John C, 
Sweeney, Daniel F. 



8th Mass., E, 
8th Mass., H, 



8th Mass., H, 
8th Mass., H, 



8th Mass.,H, 



2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2.1 
2d 
2d 
2d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 



Class, 


19, 


do. 


19, 


do. 


19, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


21, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


19, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


17, 


do. 


17, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


16, 


do. 




do. 


- 


do. 





18 
18 
20 
19 
18 
19 
20 
18 
18 
18 
19 
16 
18 
16 
17 
16 
15 
17 
16 
16 
15 
17 
17 
16 
17 
16 



Sharpshooters, .... 7 
First class marksmen, . . 12 
Second class marksmen, . . 22 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



18 

2 

— 61 



COMPANY I, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 


Clark, F. Ernest, .' 




D. M., 


48, 50, 49 


Private, 


Abbott, W. T., 


- 


D. M., 


50, 49, 49 


(< 


Sisson, A. H 


- 


D. M., 


44, 47, 44 


Captain, 


Packard, P. Frank, . 


1st Mass., K, 


S. S., 


48, 46, 44 


Lieutenant, 


Jones, William C, . 


- 


S. S., 


44, 47, 49 


1st Sergeant, 


Crosby, H. P., . 


- 


S. s., 


45, 46, 42 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Green, A. W., . 


46th U. S. V., 
N. C. S. 


S. s., 


44, 47, 45 


Sergeant, . 


Linehan, J. P., 


U. S. Stmr. 
Catskill. 


S. s., 


49, 46, 43 


<< 


Percival, B. W., 


- 


s. s., 


50, 48, 44 


Corporal, . 


Campbell, H. D., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 47, 43 


Lance Corporal, . 


Leavitt, W. C, 


- 


s. s., 


46, 47, 44 


Bugler, 


Brennan, W. J., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 49, 47 


Private, 


Davies, W., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 49, 47 


(i 


Dawson, C. A., 


1st Mass., C, 


s. s., 


48, 47, 45 


<< 


Hamilton, J. L., Jr., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 49, 42 


<t 


Hanson, P. S., . 


- 


s. s., 


49, 50, 47 


(< 


Woolridge, W. J., . 


- 


s. s.. 


46, 46, 42 


Corporal, . 


Burdett, H. M., 


- 


1st Class, 


44, 44, - 


c< 


Farrington, W. W., . 


8th Mass.,D, 


1st do. 


43, 42, - 


Private, 


Atkinson, G. C, 


- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


<« 


Besse, A. G., . 


*• 


1st do. 


42,43, - 



158 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S EEPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY I, EIGHTH INFANTRY - Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Bane. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


Chamberlin, W. H., 




1st Class, 


46, 44, - 


<( 


Habgood, H., . 


- 


1st do. 


45, 42, - 


«« 


Kimball, A. H., 




- 


1st do. 


44, 42, - 


(< 


Smith, A. M., . 




_ 


1st do. 


44,43, - 


«( 


Sylvester, S. H., 




- 


1st do. 


46, 42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Wyman, L., 




- 


2d do. 


19,24 


«< 


Hanson, G. E., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Martin, A. H., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


t< 


Matson, W. E., 




- 


2d do. 


18,21 


«< 


Morse, J. F., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


c< 


Gainley, L. N., 




8th Mass., D, 


2d do. 


18,21 


Private, 


Alexander, G. L., 




1st U. S. Vol. 
Engs., A. 


2d do. 


18, 19 


<( 


Baker, J. S., 




1st Miss., C, 


2d do. 


20,20 


«« 


Bradford, P., . 




- 


2d do. 


21,21 


<( 


Bradley, K. M., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Connors, R. S., 




- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


<« 


Copp, A. G , . 




- 


2d do. 


18,21 


(< 


Cotton, E. C, . 




- 


2d do. 


18,20 


<« 


Cutler, C. A., . 




_ 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Dovle, E. A., . 




IstN. H., H., 


2d do. 


18,20 


{< 


Engel, K., 




- 


2d do. 


21,21 


<( 


Foster, J. L., . 




- . 


2d do. 


19,20 


<« 


Harris, W. D.. . 




- 


2d do. 


19, 20 


<< 


Havward, H. E., 




- 


2d do. 


19,20 


«< 


Healy, W. H., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


«< 


Holmes, E. A., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Horton, F. L., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


i< 


Kenney, I. L., . 




- 


2d do. 


22,23 


M 


Kenney, W. A., 




- 


2d do. 


19,20 


<« 


Palmer, A. F., . 




- 


2d do. 


18,20 


(t 


Raddin, G. G., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


(< 


Raddin, T., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(( 


Reierson, 0., . 




- 


2d do. 


19,21 


(« 


Roles, W. M., . 




- 


2d do. 


18,19 


(< 


Stratton, G. M., 




- 


2d do. 


20,21 


(« 


Walthall, M. E., 




2d Virginia, 


2d do. 


20,20 


<( 


Bizley, C. E., . 




- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


(« 


Johnson, F. 0., 




- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


«( 


MacLean, M. F., 


»• 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


(« 


Norris, H. L., . 




- 


3d do. 


15,17 


«« 


Shaw, H. A., . 




- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


<« 


Ternstedt, A. K., 




— 


3d do. 


16,17 


Distinguished 


marksmen, . . 3 


Second class marksmen, . 


. 31 


Sharpshooters 


14 


Third class marksmen, 


. 6 


First class maj 


•ksmen, . . 9 


Total, .... 


. —63 



COMPANY L, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Provost, Joseph H., 


8th Mass.,L, 


S. S 


•> 


44, 46, 46 


Lieutenant, 


Connors, James E., . 


8th Mass., L, 


1st Class, 


42, 42, - 


Private, 


Carmody, John, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


«< 


. 


Carroll, John F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


(< 


. 


Tessier, Charles, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, 


# 


Hewett, Thomas J., 


8th Mass.,L, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


# 


Connors, John T., . 


8th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<« 


. 


Teichman, Frank F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


Corporal, 


• 


Hagerty, John A., . 


— 


2d 


do. 


19,18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



159 



COMPANY L, EIGHTH INFANTRY -Concluded. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Corporal, 


• 


Private, 


. 


<< 




<< 


. 


<< 




it 




(( 




(< 




<< 




u 




(( 


. 


«« 




(« 


. 


Captain, 
1st Sergeanl 
Corporal, 
Sergeant, 
Lieutenant, 


'.» • 


Private, 


. 


<( 


• 



Young, Alfred E., . 
Carpenter, John F., . 
Blanchet, Frederick A., 
Shaw, Arthur, . 
Hulton, William E., 
Maguire, John F., . 
Torrey, Escar J., 
Guilfoyle, Frederick C, 
Sheedy, James, 
Goodwin, Leonard A., 
Lund, Louis S., 
Fitzgerald, Frank, . 
Purcell, James H., . 
Cattor, David, . 
Larrivee, Eugene, . 
Shea, John F., . 
Doherty, John J., 
Daley, William J., . 
Armitage, George A., 
Kane, Patrick, . 
Cuss, George, . 



8th Mass., L, 
8th Mass., L, 
8th Mass., L, 
8th Mass , L, 
8th Mass., L, 
8th Mass., L, 



2d Class, 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 
S. S., 
S. S., 
2d Class, 
2d do. 
1st do. 
3d do. 
2d do. 



18 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
15 
15 
1,3 
16 
17 
16 
16 
15 



18 
15 
16 
15 
16 
16 
15 
15 
15 
15 
16 
15 
15 
16 



Sharpshooters, .... 3 
First class marksmen, . . 2 
Second class marksmen, . . 11 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



14 
23 



53 






COMPANY M, EIGHTH INFANTRY. 



Corporal, 

Captain, 

Lieutenant, 


• 


Sergeant, . 


• 


Corporal, 


• 


(< 




Private, 


, 


<< 


, . 


(< 


, . 


(< 


. 


<< 


. 


Musician, 


, 


Private, 


. 


(< 


1 > 


(C 


. 


Sergeant, 
Private, 


' 


(< 




a 




it 




<< 




<( 




<< 




(< 




(C 




(( 




(( 




ti 


• 



Frost, George N., 
Canfield, George I., . 
Sleeper, Stephen W., 
Ulm, Albert A., 
Collupy, Carroll R., 
Cook, Wellington T., 
Cowan, John W., 
Wiley, Robert S., . 
Bodge, Herbert W., . 
Craig, Alfred J., 
Foskett, Clifford G-, 
Gorrell, Robert W., . 
McKenzie, Harry F., 
Parkhurst, Charles W., 
Penny, George S., . 
Richardson, William A., 
Small, Robert C, 
Clements, Herman J., 
Baker, William, 
Lawson, Lorenzo. W., 
Donahue, Timothy, . 
Parmenter, John J , . 
Rebello, William P., 
Sumner, Thomas L., 
Wallace, William A., 
Wallace, George A., 
Wentworth, Clarence W. 
Adams, Ralph S., . 
Carty, John J., 
Skane, Richard W., . 



8th Mass., M, 

8th Mass., M, 
8th Mass., M, 
5th Mass., L, 
8th Mass., M, 



1st Class, 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 



- 




2d 


do. 


- 




2d 


do. 


- 




2d 


do. 


- 




2d 


do. 


- 




2d 


do. 


- 




2d 


do. 


8th Mass. 


,M, 


2d 


do. 


8th Mass. 


M, 


2d 


do. 


8th Mass. 


, M, 


2d 


do. 


- 




2d 


do. 


8th Mass. 


M, 


3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


8th Mass. 


M, 


3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


- 




3d 


do. 


8th Mass. 


M, 


3d 


do. 


8th Mass. 


K, 


2d 


do. 



42, 44, 
18, 18 

18 



19 

18 
IS 
18 
20 
18 
21 
20 
19 
18 
21 
20 
20 
18 
15 
17 
15 
15 
15 
17 
18 
15 
15 
17 



21 
18 

20 
18 
19 
19 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
19 
19 
18 
15 
15 
15 
18 
16 
17 
15 
15 
15 
15 



160 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY M, EIGHTH INFANTRY— Concluded. 



Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Lieutenant, 
1st Sergeant, 
Private, 


Wiley, Joseph E., . 
Hanaford, Louis L., 
Parkhurst, Edwin F., 


8th Mass., M, 
8th Mass., M, 


2d Class, 
2d do. 
2d do. 


- 



First class marksman, . . 1 
Second class marksmen, . . 20 
Third class marksmen, . . 12 



Unqualified members, . . 18 
Total, —51 



FIELD AND STAFF, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 
Colonel, 

Captain, 

Lieutenant, 

Sergeant Major, . 

Color Sergeant, . 

Major, 

Lieut. Colonel, . 

Major, 
Captain, 

Lieutenant, 
Sergeant Major, . 
Bugler, 

Lieutenant, 
<« 

Major, 

Sergeant, . 

Major, 

Hosp. Steward, . 

Orderly, 



Breen, John, 
Donovan, William H., 



Kane, John P., 
Murphy, Daniel J., 
Connelly, Matthew, 
Frost, Charles, . 
Sullivan, John J., 
Logan, Lawrence J., 



Murray, George F. H., 
Casey, William J., . 
McGourty, James E., 
Golden, John T., 
Phelps, Asa L., 
Sullivan, James E., . 

Flanagan, Benjamin J., 
Foley, Joseph J., 
Kelley, Joseph J., . 

Monks, James M., . 
Lombard, John P., . 
Hickey, David C, . 

Novak, Michael C, . 







9th Mass., 


Field. 




9th Mass. 


F, 


9th Mass. 


L, 


9th Mass. 


K, 


9th Mass. 


E, 


9th Mass . , 


Field. 




9th Mass. 


B, 


9th Mass. 


I, 


9th Mass. 


E, 


9th Mass., 


N C. S. 




9th Mass., 


H, 


9th Mass., 


c, 


9th Mass., 


Staff. 




9th Mass., 


N. C. S. 




9th Mass., 


I, 



D. M., 

S. S., 

s. s., 
s. s.,' 

S. o., 

S. s., 

IstClass, 
2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

1st do. 
1st do. 
2d do. 

2d do. 
3d do. 
3d do. 

3d do. 



47, 48, 46 

48, 49, 48 

46, 47, 45 

47, 47, 45 
46, 46, 45 

48, 49, 48 
45, 43, - 

21, 20 

18, 19 
18, 19 
24, 19 
18, 19 
18, 19 
19,20 



16, 17 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 
Sharpshooters, .... 5 
First class marksmen, . .3 
Second class marksmen, . . 9 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



3 
7 
— 28 



COMPANY A, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Rogers, George M., . 


9th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


46, 47, 46 


1st Sergeant, 


Frost, Frederick C, 


9th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


46, 47, 46 


Sergeant, . 


Doolan, John P.. 


9th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


47, 47, 47 


« 


Wythe, Thomas P., . 


9th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


46, 49, 47 


Private, 


Cuddy, John R., 


9th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


47, 48, 46 


(< 


Rae. Edward P., 


9th Mass., A, 


s. s., 


46, 47, 46 


Lieutenant, 


Sullivan, Timothy J., 


9th Mass., A, 


1st Class, 


43,42, - 


Corporal, . 


Sammon, John J., . 


9th Mass., A, 


1st do. 


42,43, - 


Private, 


McCarthy, Michael C, . 


9th Mass., A, 


1st do. 


44, 44, - 


Lieutenant, 


Logan, Edward, 


9th Mass., 
N. C. S. 


2d do. 


18, 18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



161 



COMPANY A, NINTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Sergeant, . 


Maguire, Hugh J., . 


9th Mass., A, 


2d Class, 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Connolly, Daniel, 


9th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


Private, 


Blaisdell, William, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Brown, James F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


a 


Casey, Patrick J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


23,23 


(( 


Dunne, John J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


23,21 


(( 


Fuller, John J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


(( 


Fuller, Edward G., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Healey, Edmund A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,24 


<( 


Kelly, John J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,19 


(< 


McKenna, Dennis F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Nelson, Harold, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Sullivan, Michael A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


(( 


Shannon, James, 


9th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Corporal, . 


Corkery, Jeremiah F., 


9th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Gaylor, Frederick, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<t 


Haverty, James, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


a 


Phillips, Richard, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


(< 


Downey, James W, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Corporal, . ! 


Hewes, George B., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Private, 


Keown, Edward J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


(< 


McEldowney, Ernest, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Sergeant, . 


Doyle, Michael J., . 


9th Mass., A, 


S. S 


•> 


- 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Hurney, Michael F., 


9th Mass., A, 


2d Class, 


- 


Corporal, . 


McQuillan, George H., . 


9th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Battis, Alfred C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


<«. 


Connolly, Thomas S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


Corporal, . 


Driscoll, Michael A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Wall, Charles J., . , . 


9th Mass., A, 


2d 


do. 


- 


Musician, . 


Slattery, Maurice F., 


9th Mass., D, 


3d 


do. 


- 


Private, 


Allgaier, Jacob, 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


(< 


Chambers, Frank F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


t( 


Corbett, Thomas F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


«< 


Foley, Robert J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


«< 


Gilmore, William, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


(< 


Donahue, James W., 


9th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


_ 


<< 


McCurdy, George, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


«< 


Walsh, Thomas F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


(i 


Wallace, John, 


9th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


- 


Sharpshooters 


i, . . . .7 Third class marksmen, 


. 17 


First class im 


irksmen, . . 3 


Unqualified members, 




. 8 


Second class ] 


marksmen, . . 22 


Total, . 


• 


. —57 



COMPANY B, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Walsh, James F., . 


9th Mass.,B, 


S. S 




45, 48, 48 


Lieutenant, 


Hickey, John J., 


9th Mass., B, 


s. s 




44, 49, 48 


Sergeant, . 


Carnie, John, . 


9th Mass., B, 


s. s 




45, 48, 49 


Lieutenant, 


Guthrie, James A., . 


- 


1st Class, 


45, 45, - 


Corporal, . 


Bertsch, Frank, 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 43, - 


<( 


Cameron, C. W., 


- 


1st 


do. 


43, 45, - 


<c 


Neil, W. J., . 


2U.S.,H.A., 
G. 


1st 


do. 


42, 43, - 


Private, 


Buckley, D. A., 


1st 


do. 


43, 45, - 


Sergeant, . 


Graham, J. J., . 


9th Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


i< 


Kirby, Thomas, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<« 


Morrissey, John, 


9th Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Callaghan, M. J., 


9th Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 



162 ADJUTANT GEKEKAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY B, NINTH INFANTRY- Concluded. 







Service in U- S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Corporal, . 


Ryan, W. F., . 


9th Mass., B, 


2d Class, 


18,20 


t< 


Smart, M. F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


<< 


Bishop, W. J., . 


1st Engineers, 

L. 
1st Engineers, 

L. 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


<< 


Scannell, W. J., 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


(< 


Conlon, J. M 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


Musician, . 


Carroll, N. F., . 


9th Mass., B, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Cobb, N. A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


K 


Cleary, N. A., . 


1st Engineers, 
L. 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Crowton, G. F., 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<( • 


Howe, J. F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


" * 


Jennings, E. P., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


tt 


Judge, P. W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


M 


Powers, C. C, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


(< 


Tavlor, H. S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


it 


Watson, G. W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Kelly, John P., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,15 


Private, 


Ames, P. F., 


- 


3d 


'do. 


15, 15 


(i 


Bell, T. F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


a 


Burns, M. F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Cady, P. J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


tt 


Cobb, J. M., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


n 


Coughlin, J. J., 


9th Mass., D, 


3d 


do. 


18, 15 


• • 


Fitzgerald, J. S., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


n 


Hein, J. W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


<( 


Holland, P. W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,18 


tt 


Kelly, P. J 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Kelsch, H. W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


(< 


Kenney, E. J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


it 


Mahoney, P. J., 


9th Mass., B, 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


it 


McDonald, J. J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


n 


Morgan, E. V., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


a 


O'Brien, J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a \ ' 


Sullivan, F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


a 


Stanton, C. M., 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 16 


tt 


Schindler, E. M., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


a 


Toomev, C, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


it 


Ward, H. J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


tt 


Whalen, J. J 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Edwards, A. P., 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


a 


Weir, W. F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


- 


a 


Wilson, G. A., . 


9th Mass., A, 


3d 


do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, .... 3 
First class marksmen, . . 5 
Second class marksmen, . . 19 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



26 
6 
— 59 



COMPANY C, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 
Q. M. Sergeant, 
Lieutenant, 
1st Sergeant, 
Corporal, . 
Captain, 
Sergeant, . 



Bowlen, Maurice E., 
Henderson, William F., 
King, Michael L., . 
Horgan, John A , 
Mclsaac, Frank L., . 
Quinlan, Thomas F., 
Stickel, Louis C, 
King, Mark A., 



9th Mass., C, 

9th Mass., C, 
9th Mass., C, 

9th Mass., C, 



s. s 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



45, 48, 45 
44, 46, 44 
44, 45 
42,47 
43,44 
18, 18 
21,21 
20, 19 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JSTo. 7. 



163 



COMPANY C, NINTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Sergeant, . 


Stewart, Richard J., 




2d Class, 


20,20 


(< 


Kehoe, Thaddeus M., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21 


22 


Corporal, . 


Ayers, Nathan, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


tt 


Barrett, Patrick K., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19 


20 


<< 


Kane, Paul F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


Private, 


Cox, Joseph F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


c< 


Green, George A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20 


21 


<( 


Harrington, Thomas S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


<i 


Kelleher, Cornelius A., . 


9th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


<< % # 


Kane, Walter J., 


9th Mass., C, 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


<< 


McCarthy, Louis W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


19 


<« 


Moriarty, James, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18 


18 


Corporal, . 


Hagerty, James A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


18 


Musician, . 


Barrett, William H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17 


16 


Private, 


Blaney, James J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 


<i 


Carroll, Daniel J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


16 


<t 


Catarius, Jacob, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


<« 


Desmond, John J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


17 


t< 


Donahue, Michael H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


17 


(< 


Kelley, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 


<i 


Libbey, Waldo H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


(i 


Morgan, John F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


<< 


Mullen, James F. P., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


17 


t< 


McGourty, Francis E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


16 


(< 


McDonald, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


«< 


McDonald, Gardner W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


19 


«< 


North, Charles H , . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


<« 


O'Keefe, Patrick D., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


(< 


Phillips, John V., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


18 


tt 


Putnam, Ernest C., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


15 


a 


Sharon, Fred G., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16 


17 


it 


Thompson, John H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


, 15 


(< 


Truesdale, David A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


, 16 


i« 


Winn, Bartholomew D., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


15 


(( 


Washburn, Bertram, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15 


, 16 


(< 


Yerrick, William R., 


— 


3d 


do. 


15 


,20 



Sharpshooters, .... 2 
First class marksmen, . . 3 
Second class marksmen, . . 15 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



24 
19 



63 



COMPANY E, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Lieutenant, 

Sergeant, 

Musician, 

Captain, 

Sergeant, 



Corporal, 
1st Sergeant 
Corporal, 



Private, 



Sullivan, Daniel P., . 
Brennan, John J., . 
Televich, Charles S., 
Barry, John J., 
Dunn, John A., 
Healy, Thomas P., . 
Curran, Peter J.; 
Healv, Cornelius J., 
Galvin, Joseph P., . 
Fielding, Henry P., 
Kenney, John J., 
Sullivan, William H., 

Donovan, Paul F., . 
Brett, John R., 
Coleman, James I., . 



9th Mass., E, 

9th Mass., E, 
9th Mass., E, 
9th Mass., E, 
9th Mass., E, 
9th Mass., E, 
9th Mass., E, 
9th Mass.,B, 
9th Ma8S.,E, 
9th Mass.,E, 
9th Mass., E, 
2d U. S. 

Art'y, 
9th Mass., E, 



s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



46, 48, 49 

47, 48, 47 
50, 50, 50 
42,42, - 
42,44, - 

46.47, - 

45.48, - 
47,46, - 

19, 19 

19, 19 

20, 19 
18, 18 

19,20 

18, 18 

19, 18 



164 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY E, NINTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in TJ. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Private, 


Conley, Patrick J., . 




2d Class, 


20,20 


(i 


Henchon, James D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Keon, John, Jr., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


i< 


Lowther, William H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


(i 


McLaughlin, Michael. E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


(< 


McMahon, John, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


<< 


Mahoney, Daniel L., 


9th Mass., D, 


2d 


do. 


22, 21 


<< 


Mahoney, Thomas F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Rilley, James J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


<< 


Dunn, Nicholas J., . 




2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Lieutenant, 


Murphy, Cornelius J., 




3d 


do. 


15,15 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Lavin, Mathew J., . 


9th Mass., E, 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


Corpora], . 


Kane, John, 


9th Mass. , E, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


c< 


Verkampen, Joseph A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


Private, 


Burrill, Albert A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


it 


Broderick, Samuel J., 


- 


3d 


do.. 


15, 15 


<( 


Buttrick, Fred. J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Burke, "Wallace, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<( 


Canavan, John L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Donigan, Robert F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<( 


Duggan, John M., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<( 


Earlev, William B., 




3d 


do. 


16, 16 


M 


Fay, Herbert F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


it 


Flynn, Thomas F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


it 


Gallagher, Edward J., 


9th Mass., E, 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


it 


Griffin, Thomas F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


il 


Gulley, George E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


U 


Hannon, Edward M , 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


« 


Harrington, Edward L., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 17 


(< 


Jackson, Richard T., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<« 


Kelley, W T illiam F., . 


9th Mass.,E, 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


it 


Kelly, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,16 


«( 


Lanagan, Edward J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Lee, Michael J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


(« 


Lee, Robert E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


«< 


O'Brien, John H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


41 


Peckham, Albert W , 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(( 


Pezzith, John, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(« 


Rose, Edward C, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


«< 


Royal, Edward D., . 


U. S. Navy, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(( 


Sullivan, Dennis J., . 


9th Mass., E, 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(« 


Sullivan, Cornelius J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


tt 


Walsh, William W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


U 


Driscoll, Cornelius W., . 


' 


3d 


do. 


~ 


Sharpshooters 


, . . . .311 


hird class mark 


?men 


» • 


. 34 


First class ma 


rksmen, . .51 


rnqualified mem 


bers, 


. 


. 3 


Second class r 


uarksmen, . . 17 J 


Total, . 


• 


• 


. —62 





COMPANY F, NINTH INFANTRY. 




Captain, 


Sands, Patrick A., . 


9th Mass., F, 


S. S., 


47, 46, 47 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Manahan, Ezra F., Jr., . 


8th Mass., B, 


s. s., 


45, 47, 47 


Private, 


Gemmell, William H., 


9th Mass., F, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 45 


(< 


Kirkwood, Thomas, 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 45 


Lieutenant, 


Donovan, Frank L., 


9th Mass., F, 


1st Class, 


43,44, - 


a 


Boles, Michael S., . 


9th Mass., F, 


1st do. 


42, 43, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Graham, Peter, 


9th Mass., F, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, . 


McNally, Frank, 


~ 


2d do. 


18, 18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



165 



COMPANY F, NINTH INFANTRY -Concluded. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Sergeant, 

(< 

Corporal, 
Musician, 
Private, 



Sergeant, 
Corporal, 



Private, 



Kelleher, John J., 
Tierney, Frank, 
Corcoran, Francis, 
Needham, Sumner H 
Flaherty, Thomas, 
Finnegan, James, 
Grace, Charles, 
Hill, Alfred, . 
Holland, William, 
Kelleher, Dennis H., 
Matruire, Michael J., 
McCarthy, William J., 
Whittaker, Arthur N., 
Butler, Frank J., 
Fitzgerald, Maurice, 
Higgins, Patrick J. 
Coleman, Frank, 
Beever, Albert, . 
Casey, James, . 
Flantwell, James, 
Corcoran, John J., 
Charleton, Walter T. 
Donovan, John J., 
Evans, William T., 
Fagan, Charles A., 
Foley, Martin J., 
Fitzgerald, John F., 
Fitzpatrick, Charles S. 1 
Griffin, Chris. P., . 
Henderson, Millard, 
Linnehan, John J., . 
Manion, John J., 
Moynihan, Timothy F , 
Moynihan, Michael A., 
McCavitt, James B., 
Norton, Patrick J. 
Reagan, John A., 
Sweeney, John, 
Shea, Maurice P., 
Rinn, William F., 
Williams, William H. 
Worster, John B., . 



9th Mass., B, 



2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 
3d 



Class, 


20, 


do. 


19, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


20, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


20, 


do. 


21, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


19, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


23, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


17, 


do. 


17, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


17, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


17, 


do. 


17, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


16, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


18, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


15, 


do. 


19, 



,21 
, 19 
, 18 
, 19 
,21 
, 19 
, 20 
, 21 
, 20 
, 19 
, 18 
, 19 
, 19 
, 16 
, 17 
, 16 
, 16 
, 15 
,17 
, 17 
, 16 
, 16 
,17 
, 17 
, 17 
, 16 
, 15 
,17 
, 15 
, 16 
, 16 
, 19 
, 16 
, 16 
, 16 
, 15 
, 17 
,17 
, 15 
, 15 
, 16 
,16 



Sharpshooters, .... 4 
First class marksmen, . . 2 
Second class marksmen, . .15 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



29 
13 
-63 



COMPANY G, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Moynihan, Jeremiah J., . 


9th Mass., G, 


S. S., 


46, 48, 48 


Lieutenant, 


Hines, Matthew E., . 


- 


S. S., 


47, 48, 48 


a 


Hurley, John F., 


9th Mass., G, 


S. S., 


45, 46, 47 


1st Sergeant, 


McCann, William E., 


9th Mass., G, 


S. S., 


46, 47, 46 


Sergeant, . 


Corliss, John J., 


9th Mass., G, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 46 


«< 


Horan, Michael J., . 


9th Mass., G, 


s. s., 


46, 47, 46 


a 


Degnan, Charles J., 


9th Mass., G, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 46 


u 


Lavin, Thomas F., . 


9th Mass., G, 


s. s., 


47, 46, 46 


Private, 


Prendeville, Patrick J., . 


9th Mass., G, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Burke, David J., 


9th Mass., G, 


1st Class, 


43,44, - 



166 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY G, NINTH INFANTRY -Concluded. 







Service in D. S. 








Bane. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
19U1. 






Regt. and Co. 








Corporal, . 


Rooney, Robert H., 


9th Mass., G, 


1st Class, 


43,42, - 


«( 


McGuire, Hugh, 


9th Mass., G, 


1st 


do. 


46,45, - 


Private, 


Casey, James A., 


9th Mass , G, 


1st 


do. 


42, 42, - 


i< 


Cavanaugh, John F., 


12th U. S. I., 


1st 


do. 


42, 44, - 


«( 


Carberry, Edward J., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42,44, - 


«« 


O'Gorman, Samuel J., 


_ 


1st 


do. 


43,42, - 


K 


Quinn, John H., 


- 


1st 


do. 


42, 43, - 


Corporal, . 


Keane, Maurice A., . 


9th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


23,21 


a 


Shea, Michael J., 


12th U. S. L, 


2d 


do. 


23,23 


Musician, . 


Sperrett, Nicholas J., 


i 9th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


Private, 


Baldwin, Henry W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


« 


Burke, Ulysses" M M . 


12th U. S. I., 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


«( 


Cullen, Joseph W., . 


6th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


«< 


Delaney, Michael J., 


9th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


(« 


Donovan, Michael J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


{< 


Driscoll, Dennis J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Foley, Thomas F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<« 


Gardner, Octave, 


12th U. S. I , 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


(i 


Kneeland, Fred W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 19 


«« 


McGourty, Michael M., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


« 


McMahon, Timothy J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Moriarty, Michael J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


<< 


Moriarty, Timothy J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


<( 


Power, John J., * . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 20 


<< 


Shea, John F-, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,23 


«< 


Scanlon, Charles M., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, i9 


(• 


Whalen, James, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 20 


<< 


Burns, James F., 


- 


3d 


'do. 


15, 17 


<< 


Carberry, James M., 


9th Mass., G, 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


«< 


Doyle, Dennis J., 


9th Mass., G, 


3d 


do. 


20, 17 


«< 


Forhan, Edward F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


(< 


Heffernan, John "W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Kelleher, John J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Lavertv, Herbert J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


MaNultv, John F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«< 


McGillicuddy, Gerald F., 


9th Mass , G, 


3d 


do. 


16, 18 


k 


Morrissey, Thomas F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(« 


O'Leary, Cornelius J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«< 


Sullivan, Michael J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


«( 


Sullivan, William E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


(i 


Kelley, George E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


(< 


Power, James F., 


9th Mass., G, 


2d 


do. 


- 


<< 


Sullivan, John, 


- 


3d 


do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen, 



22 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



14 

3 
— 56 



COMPANY H, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Haves. John J., 


9th Mass., H, 


1st Class, 


47,44 


1st Sergeant, 


Sears, Fred. F., 


9th Mass., H, 


1st do. 


42,43 


Sergeant, . 


Connollv, Bartholomew, . 


9th Mass., H, 


1st do. 


43,44 


Corporal, . 


Donoghue, Charles C, 


9th Mass., H, 


1st do. 


43, 44 


k 


Sullivan, Patrick J., 


9th Mass., H, 


1st do. 


44,46 


Private, 


Harvey, Arthur, 


•- 


1st do. 


45,44 


« 


McCarthy. Jeremiah F., . 


9th Mass., H, 


1st do. 


43,44 


Lieutenant, 


Sullivan, Patrick H., 


9th Mass., H, 


2d do. 


19, 19 


<« 


Clark, Thomas F , . 


9th Mass., H, 


2d do. 


19,20 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



16T 



COMPANY H, NINTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 













Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volanteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Odermatt, Francis J., 


9th Mass., H, 


2d Class, 


19, 19 


Sergeant, . 


Sheehan, John J., . 


9th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<t 


Tracy, James E , 


9th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


n 


Sampson, William H., 


9th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Moore, George F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


«( 


Fox, John P., . 


9th Mass., H, 


2d 


do. 


18, 20 


Musician, . 


Harrington, Frank C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Barron, Patrick S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


it 


Blake, Patrick J., . 


S. C, 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<< 


Deegan, John, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<( 


Gallagher, John J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


n 


Schonfeldt, Arthur, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<< 


Todd, Robert A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<< 


White, John A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


Corporal, . 


Waters, Fred J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


Private, 


Brady, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,16 


<< 


Burns, William J., . 


9th Mass., H, 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


(< 


Craffey, George A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<(. 


Donnelly, Thomas J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Falconner, Charles, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<t 


Flaherty, Lawrence, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


u 


Foley, William T., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


a 


Gibbons, John C, . 


9th Mass., H, 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Graham, Joseph A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Keefe, Frank A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Kirby, David T., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(< 


Mahoney, Timothy J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


«< 


Mexal, George, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(( 


O'Connell, William, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Sanders, George B., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 18 


<( 


Sullivan, Cornelius J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(< 


Sullivan, John J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<« 


Sweeney, William J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


« 


Taylor, Frederick J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


Corporal, . 


Devlin, Thomas N., . 


9th Mass., H, 


1st 


do. 


— 



First class marksmen, . . 8 
Second class marksmen, . . 16 
Third class marksmen, . . 20 



Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



10 
— 54 



COMPANY I, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Cully, James A., 


9th Mass., I, 


S. S 




44, 47, 45 


Sergeant, . 


Marston, Arthur F., 


9th Mass., I, 


s. s 




45, 46, 44 


Private, 


Larken, Emmet J., . 


9th Mass., I, 


s. s 




47, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Delaney, John F., . 


9th Mass., T, 


1st Class, 


42, 43, - 


<< 


Mclnnes, John F., . 


9th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


44,44, - 


1st Sergeant, 


Zewer, Russell M., . 


9th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


43,44, - 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Puddister, Edward J., 


9th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


42,44, - 


Sergeant, . 


Sheehan, William J., 


9th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


43,44, - 


<< 


Burke, Patrick F., Jr., . 


9th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


43,44, - 


Corporal, . 


Herley, Charles J., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


43,44, - 


Musician, . 


Quill, Patrick E., . 


9th Mass., I, 


1st 


do. 


44,42, - 


Private, 


Crimmons, Joseph P., 


- 


1st 


do. 


44,42, - 


«c 


Deady, Charles F., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


44,43, - 


c< 


Hannon, John F., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


45, 45, - 


Sergeant, . 


Byrnes, Walter J., . 


9th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Canning, Henry L., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<( 


Kemp, Herman W., 


— 


2d 


do. 


19,21 



168 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S KEFOET. [Jan, 



COMPANY I, NINTH INFANTRY — Concluded. 







Service in XT. 8. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co 








Corporal, . 


Lally, Thomas J., . 




2d Class, 


21, 18 


it 


McCarthy, Dennis J., 


- 


2d 


do- 


18, 18 


<( 


Sheehan, James J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 19 


Private, 


Feeley, Daniel P., . 


U. S. Navy, 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


«< 


Foley, Peter M., % . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


<« 


Harrow, John F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


<< 


Hayden, Thomas J., 


9th Mass., I, 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


« 


Lee, Christopher F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<« 


Mackey, John P., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Murphy, Andrew J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


K 


Winch, Waldo H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Killeen, James F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


Private, 


Barron, John F., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


<( 


Brodie, Patrick B., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


<« 


Cahill, Martin, 


7th U. S., 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


«* 


Costello, Peter F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Dowling. John S., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


«< 


Drake, Frederick, Jr., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Fahey, Patrick J., . 


7th U. S., 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


11 


Flynn, William J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


18, 16 


«c 


Gallagher, William J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 15 


it 


Hoppe, Frank A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


(< 


Jay, Edward C, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<« 


Kane, John J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


(< 


Keefe, Augustine, . 


9th Mass., I, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(« 


Keeley, James, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<« 


Krause, Herman C, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


t< 


Leary, John J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


<( 


Lane, Edward T., . 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<< 


Lindstrom, John J., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<< 


Maginnis, John W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


«< 


Mahoney, John J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


<( 


McNulty, Edward J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


c< 


Quirk, Michael, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


« 


Shine, John M., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Stuart, James, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


(i 


Sullivan, John F , . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


« 


Willeverth, Frank J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Young, Joseph H., . 


~ 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


<< 


Corcoran, John J., . 


~ 


3d 


do. 


- 


<( 


Mulert, William F., 


_ 


3d 


do. 


- 



Sharpshooters, . . . .3 
First class marksmen, . . 11 
Second class marksmen, . . 14 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



30 

4 



62 



COMPANY K, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Corporal, 
Private, 



Sergeant, . 
Lance Corporal, 
Corporal, . 
Lieutenant, 
Private, 



Cannon, Peter J., 
Healey, Martin J., . 
Barrows, Lester N., . 
Call, Charles H., . 
Clements, Thomas A., 
Doody, William, 
Scanlon, Edward J., 
Sullivan, William E., 
O'Malley, Michael F., 
Boyle, John J., 
Clements, Louis, 



9th Mass., K, 
9th Mass., K, 



9th Mass., K, 
9th Mass.,K, 



s. s 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



45. 46, 45 
44, 46, 44 

42.43, - 

42.44, - 
42, 43, - 
43,43, - 
44, 45, - 
42,43, - 

43.45, - 
18, 18 
20,20 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JSTo. 7. 



169 



COMPANY K, NINTH INFANTRY- Concluded. 



Rank. 



Namk. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Kegt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Musician, 
Private, 



Corporal, 

«< 

Private, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 



Corporal, 
1st Sergeant 
Private, 



Corporal, 
«< 

Private, 

Q. M. Sergeant, 

Private, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 
«< 

Sergeant, 
Private, 



Duran, William P., 
Holleran, Michael, 
Kittridge, Edward, 
Kittridge, George E 
Morgan, Sidney, 
Mulroy, John J., 
Munroe, George M., 
McCarthy, Charles, 
McCormick, Henry J. 
McDonnell, James E., 
McGuinness, Michael, 
McNamee, John, 
McRell, Robert, 
Nacy, Martin, . 
O'Connor, William, 
Perry, Silas, 
Pierson, Fredrick J 
Quinn, Patrick, 
Russell, Alexander M. 
Scanlon, John F., 
Scanlon, James H. 
Steele, James K., 
Tierney, Charles S 
Vint, Thomas H., 
Ward, John T., 
Cochrane, George W 
Collins, John W., 
Comaskev, Thomas F., 
DeWitt, Leon S., 
Flagg, Joseph F., 
Garvey, John, . 
Grady, Standish T., 
Green, Charles D., 
Gregoire, George, 
Healey, Joseph J., 
Hoborn, Patrick J., 
Hynes, William J., 
Houlihan, Michael. 
LaFountain, Joseph 
Lawson, John R., 
Mackey, James C, 
Morgan, William, 
O'Malley, Michael A 
Orr, Thomas, . 
Robertson, James B 
Toner, Frank P., 
Toner, William F., 
Wallace, John H., 



9th Mass., K, 



9th Mass., K, 



9th Mass., K, 



9th Mass., K, 



2d Class, 


18, 19 


2d 


do. 


j 18, 18 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


2d 


do. 


20, 18 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 



Sharpshooters, .... 2 
First class marksmen, . . 7 
Second class marksmen, . . 27 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



23 
4 
-63 



COMPANY L, NINTH INFANTRY. 



Captain, 


Kennealy, John F., . 


9th Mass. 


L, 


S. 


s., 


47, 


46, 


46 


Lieutenant, 


McGee, James H., . 


9th Mass. 


L, 


s. 


s, 


46, 


48, 


47 


(i 


Schneider, Charles, . 


9th Mass.. 


L, 


s. 


s., 


45, 


47, 


47 


Sergeant, . 


Green, Charles E., . 


9th Mass. 


L, 


s. 


s., 


44, 


46, 


43 



170 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY L, NINTH INFANTRY -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 








Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 






Regt. and Co. 








Sergeant, . 


Steele, John D., 


9th Mass., L, 


S. S 


•> 


46, 48, 46 


a 


Casgrain, Dana A., . 


9th Mass., L, 


S. S 


•» 


45, 48, 46 


a 


Morein. Joseph N., . 


9th Mass , L, 


s. s 


• > 


44, 46, 43 


Corporal, . 


Pond, Franklin T., . 


- 


s. s 




45, 47, 45 


H 


Lemoine, Henry J., . 


9th Mass., L, 


1st Class, 


42,43, - 


Private, 


Bates, William P., . 


- 


1st 


do. 


43,44, - 


i< 


Kelley, Thomas H., 


- 


1st 


do. 


44,43, - 


(« 


McDonald, Stephen, 


- 


1st 


do. 


43,44, - 


<« 


McKenzie, Bennie E., 


- 


1st 


do. 


46, 44, - 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Hickey, James F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,22 


Corporal, . 


Ryan, Clement J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 21 


(< 


Murphy, Joseph E., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<< 


Clongh, Walter H., . 


9th Mass., L, 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


Musician, . 


McGrath, James J, . 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Burke, John F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


«t 


Coleman, Daniel S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


<( 


Coleman, Philip H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Crowley, Ernest, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Gerrity, John, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 20 


(< 


Gerrish, Roy C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


<< 


Hanson, Arthur D., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,18 


(< 


Hayes, William A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20, 20 


a 


Healey, Jeremiah, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21.20 


<( 


Henthorne, Charles F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


<« 


Hoeg, James A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 19 - 


M 


Hogan, Edward A., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


<< 


Lareault, Edward, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


c< 


Monteit.h, Robert J., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,20 


(< 


Page, Walter B., 


• 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


a 


Perry, Herbert E., . 


6th Mass., E, 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


<< 


Sloper, Frank S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


22,20 


Corporal, . 


Geehan, John F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


a 


Garvey, Thomas H., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Private, 


Atwood, Francis E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17, 16 


i< 


Bowes, Thomas P., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<t 


Burman, Charles, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,15 


<< 


Cotter, William E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


«< 


Dixon, Charles E., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Donahoe, Frederick W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<i 


Doran, Ambrose E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


<< 


Flynn, John F., 


9th Mass., L, 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


u 


Foley, Walter T., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16,17 


«( 


Greene, Charles A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


<« 


Houle, Peter E., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,16 


«( 


Lamont, Robert, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


McCormack. William A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


(( 


McKenzie, Harrv A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


«( 


Pluff, Napoleon P., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(( 


Potvin, Charles, 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


a 


Stapleton, Edward, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,15 


a 


Toohill, George, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Twomev, William F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


(< 


Welch, "Patrick J., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, .... 8 
First class marksmen, . . 5 
Second class marksmen, . . 23 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



21 
3 



60 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



171 



COMPANY M, NINTH INFANTRY. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Lieutenant, 


Gillow, Joseph S., . 


9th Mass., M, 


S. s., 


46, 46, 45 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Laing, John , 


9th Mass , M, 


s. s., 


47, 49, 47 


Sergeant, . 


Whiteley, Harry W., 


9th Mass.,M, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 45 


(i 


Dickey, William, 


9th Mass.,M, 


s. s , 


46, 47, 46 


<( 


Carr, Charles H., 


9th Mass., M, 


s. s., 


45, 47, 45 


Corporal, . 


Dole, George A., 


9th Mass., M, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 45 


i< 


Yarnold, Richard M., 


9th Mass., M, 


s. s., 


45, 47, 46 


Private, 


Russell, John W., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 44 


ct 


Snow, Edmund, 


_ 


s. s., 


44, 46, 44 


Lieutenant, 


McNulty, Philip, 


9th Mass., M, 


1st Class, 


46, 45, - 


Corporal, . 


Hildreth, Edward W., . 


9th Mass., M, 


1st do. 


43, 46, - 


c« 


Landry, John, . 


9th Mass., M, 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


<< 


Sweet. William F., . 


9th Mass., M, 


1st do. 


43,45, - 


Private, 


Gallagher, John P., . 


7th U. S. 
Arty., G. 


1st do. 


45, 43, - 


<( 


Currier, F. Allison, . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 43. - 


Sergeant, . 


Crowell, Elmer E., . 


9th Mass., M, 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Private, 


Allen, Eddie, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


u 


Billings, Harry R., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


a 


Douglass, Stephen A., 


9th Mass., M, 


2d do. 


22, 22 


a 


Fogarty, Fred., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


it 


Kennedy, Thomas, . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


a 


Light, Daniel H., 


_ 


2d do. 


18, 18 


ti 


MacDonald, Angus J., . 


9th Mass., M, 


2d do. 


19,20 


(( 


Page, William H., . 


9th Mass., M, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(( 


Reed, Charles F., 


- 


2d do. 


21,22 


•Corporal, . 


Turnquist, Victor, . 


9th Mass., M, 


3d do. 


16, 16 


Musician, . 


Callahan, Fred., 


_ 


3d do. 


16, 16 


Private, 


Coulter, Henry, 


_ 


3d do. 


16,17 


<< 


Coulter. Thomas, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


(< 


Duffy, James A., 


9th Mass., M, 


3d do. 


15,17 


«< 


Goulding, James A., 


5th Mass., F, 


3d do. 


15, 16 


i< 


Geoffrey, Joseph, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


i« 


Gill, John F., . 


_ 


3d do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Lawler, Arthur, 


- 


3d do. 


15,17 


it 


Largur, Oliver, 


_ 


3d do. 


15, 16 


<( 


King, Ludger, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


<« 


Regan, James, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 


ti 


Rutledge, John, 


- 


3d do. 


15,17 


«( 


Snow, Clifford, . 


_ 


3d do. 


16, 18 


tt 


Sullivan, Joseph, 


_ 


3d do. 


15,16 


a 


Vallely, James E., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


a 


Hall, Joseph C, 


- 


1st do. 


- 


it 


Hansen, Harry C, . 


- 


3d do. 


- 


it 


Keller, Allan, . 


- 


1st do. 


- 


a 


Light, Willis E., 


_ 


3d do. 


- 


(( 


Muldoon, James, 


_ 


3d do. 


- 


(( 


Metiver, Wilfred, . 


_ 


3d do. 


- 


< < 


Reeves, Lemuel, 


_ 


3d do. 


_ 


it 


Sanders, Thomas, . 


- 


3d do. 


- 


ti 


Spinney, Isaac, 


i 


3d do. 


- 


Captain, 


Mitten, Anthony D., 


9th Mass , M, 


S. s., 


■" 



Sharpshooters, . . . .10 
First class marksmen, . . 8 
Second class marksmen, . . 10 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



23 
10 



61 



172 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 



FIELD AND STAFF, FIRST CORPS CADETS. 







Service in IT. S. 






Bank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Knapp, Benjamin L., 




S. S., 


44, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Rowan, Alfred J , . 


- 


S.S., 


44. 47, 44 


t< 


Stearns, William B., 


- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


Sergeant Major, 


Thaver, Henry V., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 50, 44 


Lieutenant, 


Cheever, David, 


- 


2d Class, 


19, 20 


Lieut Colonel, . 


Edmands, Thomas F., 


- 


2d do. 


19. 19 


Major, 


Green, Charles M., . 


- 


2d do. 


20,21 


Lieutenant, 


Bremer, Samuel P., . 


- 


1st do. 


- 


<< 


Haves, William A., 2d, . 


- 


Si S., 


- 


Major, 


Robeson, Andrew, . 


— 


1st Class, 


— 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 



Second class marksmen, 
Total, . 



10 



COMPANY A, FIRST CORPS CADETS. 



Corporal, 

Lieutenant, 

Corporal, 

a 

Lieutenant, 
Sergeant, 



1st Sergeant 

Corporal, 

Private, 



Sergeant, 
Private, 



Musician, 
Private, 



Sergeant, 
Corporal, 
Private, 



Blake, Benjamin S.,. 
Blanchard, John A., 
Howe, James C, 
Lambert, Edward B., 
Lavelle, John, . 
Payson, T. Lowell, . 
Pierce, Charles S., . 
Strout, Henry F., 
Ware, Robert D., 
Adams, Ernest G., . 
Batchelor, Chauncey C, 
Bird, Reginald W., . 
Blake, John A. L., . 
Brownell. Bryant M., 
Hodges. Gilbert, Jr., 
Pierce, George B., . 
Adams, Huntington, 
Chandler, Joseph E., 
Channing. Henry M., 
Coyle, Philip E., 
Dane, Chester L., 
Dixey, Arthur S., . 
Foot, Nathan C, 
Forer, Horton C, 
Frothingham, Brooks, 
Haushtbn, Percy D., 
Hayden, Howard E., 
Hinckley, Harold, . 
Hooper, Parker M., . 
Ingalls, Lucius, 
Lawrence, John S., . 
Magoun, William N., 
I Noble, John, Jr., 
I Farker, Charles H., Jr., 
| Poor, Henry V., 
Soule, Frederick W., 
Soule, Henry W., . 
Stackpole, Pierpont L., 
Stevens, Arthur W., 
Stevenson, Thomas G., 
Swan, Walter D., . 
Tnlbot, Thomas, 
Wadleigh. Herbert A., 
Watson, Edmund J., 



S. S., 
S. S., 
S. S., 
S. S., 
S. S., 
S. S., 

s. s., 

s. s., 
s. s., 

1st Class, 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 



2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



6th Mass., E, 



2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 



44, 47, 44 
46, 48, 43 

44, 47, 44 

46, 48, 43 

45, 48, 42 
45, 46, 43 
45, 46, 43 
44, 47, 43 

47, 48, 43 
42,44, - 
47,42, - 
43,42, - 
44,42, - 
42,42, - 

42, 42, - 

43, 43, - 
20,22 
18, 19 
21.21 
19,20 

20, 22 
18,20 
20,21 
18, 19 
20,20 

21, 22 

20, 21 

21, 21 
18, 18 

18, 18 

22, 23 

19, 20 
21,21 
19,20 
19, 22 
18, 19 
19,21 
19,20 
18,20 
19,20 
IS, 18 

18, 19 

19, 20 
18,18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



173 



COMPANY A, FIRST CORPS CADETS -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class, 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


Wheelwright, William B., 




2d Class, 


18, 19 


<< 


Bigelow, William DeF., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


a 


Briggs, Frank R., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,15 


«< 


Clark, John T., 


- 


3d do. 


17,17 


a 


Fitzgerald, Harold, . 


- 


3d do. 


16,19 


(« 


Lyman, Roland T., . 


- 


3d do. 


17,17 


a 


Parks, John W., 


- 


3d do. 


16,17 


<< 


Jackson, Arthur L., 


- 


2d do. 


_ 


Captain, 


Joy, Franklin L., 


- 


S. S., 


- 


Musician, . 


Little, Frank E., 


- 


2d Class, 


- 


Private, 


Lyman, Charles F,. . 


- 


1st do. 


- 


Corporal, . 


Pennell, Henry B , . 


- 


S. S., 


- 


Private, 


Scaife, Roger L., 


- 


2d Class, 


— 



Sharpshooters, . . . .11 
First class marksmen, . . 8 
Second class marksmen, . . 32 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



6 

— 57 



COMPANY B, FIRST CORPS CADETS. 



Private, 

<< 

Captain, 
Corporal, 
Lieutenant, 
Corporal, 

a 

Private, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 

1st Sergeant 

Lieutenant 

Private, 



Corporal, 
Private, 



Sergeant, 

Private, 
«< 

Sergeant, 

Private, 
a 

Corporal, 
Private, 



Musician, 
Private, 



Allen, Frederick W., 
Bartlett, Joseph W., 
Cabot, Francis E., . 
Chase, Porter B., 
Cole, Charles H., Jr., 
Drew, Thomas L., . 
Foss, Leon F., . 
Foster, David, . 
Hale, Anthony T. E., 
Hanson, David, 
Kimball, Charles E., 
Liffler, Charles, 
Newcomb, George D., 
Perkins, Holten B., . 
Phinney, Frank F., 
Simonds, Frederic P., 
Ayers, Harold W., . 
Baldwin, Percy V., . 
Brackett, Forrest G., 
Corbin, Arthur E., . 
Kinsman, Nathaniel, Jr., 
Rice, William, . 
Burnham, Franklin J., 
Clark, Charles S., 
Cutter, Irving T., 
Hardon, Kenneth W., 
Rice, Henry N., 
Slack, H. Carleton, . 
Standley, Harry R., 
Wadsworth, Clarence S., 
Willis, Arthur L., . 
Winship, Stephen E., 
Bartlett, Ralph S., . 
Carpenter, George A., 
Forbes, John W., . 
Goodbeart, John A., 
Newman, Stephen L, 



D. M., 

S. S., 

s. s., 
s. s., 

s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 

S.S., 

s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 

S.S., 

s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 

1st Class, 
1st do. 



1st 
1st 
1st 
1st 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
3d 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



S. S., 
S. S., 
3d Class, 



46, 48, 43 
44, 47, 46 

44, 47, 43 

47, 46, 47 

45, 48, 42 
45, 46, 45 
49, 49, 46 
44, 47, 44 

44, 47, 43 
47, 48, 42 

45, 47, 43 

44, 46, 43 

45, 48, 42 
44, 46, 43 
44, 46, 44 

46, 49, 43 

44.43, - 

44.46, - 

42.44, - 

44.47, - 
42,42, - 
46,44, - 

19,20 
18, 19 
20,20 

18, 22 

19, 19 
18, 19 
19,20 
19,21 
21,21 
20,23 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 
Sharpshooters, . . . .17 
First class marksmen, . . 6 



Second class marksmen, . . 11 
Third class marksmen, . . 2 
Total, —37 



174 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S KEPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY C, FIRST CORPS CADETS. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Sergeant, 

Corporal, 

Captain, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 



Corporal, 

Private, 

Corporal, 

Private, 

«( 

1st Sergeant 
Private, 



Corporal, 

Private, 

Sergeant, 

Private, 

Lieutenant, 

Private, 
Sergeant, 
(< 

Corporal, 
<< 

Private, 



Musician, 
Private, 



Sergeant, 
Private, 



Hinckley, Freeman, 
Osborne, John F., . 
Pond, Virgil C., 
Wise, Stuart W., 
Barry, Charles S., . 
Carter, Frank B., 
Clapp, Eugene H., . 
Cross, Howard G., . 
Downing, George W., 
Flagg, Henry W., . 
Geiger, Albert, Jr., . 
Gilman, Harry S., . 
Goodwin, Frederick E. A 
Greeley, Norman F., 
Harvey, Fred P., 
Hyde, Frank C, 
Macleod, William P., 
Mitchell, William L., 
Montague, David T., 
Pierce, Eugene E., . 
Rowan, James T., . 
Stearns, Frank A., . 
Stevens, Jesse F., 
Tent, George E , 
Toppan, William J., 
Williams, Boylston L., 
Atwood, Joshua, 3d, 
Barnard, Orrin A., . 
Carter, Charles H., . 
Carter, Charles W., . 
Cowles, Luzerne S., 
Drouet, William C, 
Baylor, Henry D., . 
Bell, Tilton S., . 
Cliflord, Daniel P., . 
Coffin, Melbourne F., 
Cook, Frederick S., . 
Cozzens, Clarence S., 
Dodge, Frank E., 
Floyd, Charles H., . 
Green, Robert E., 
Holmes, Henry T., . 
Livermore, Albert S., 
Manks, George H., . 
Osborne, Walter J., . 
Pender, Horace G., . 
Phemister, Walter R., 
Rice, George W. B., 
Russell, James W., Jr., 
Sabin, Charles W., Jr., 
Staples, Henry B., . 
Strong, Lewis C, 
Tirrell, Arthur H., . 
Williams, Christopher E. 
Bright, Charles E., . 
Estes, Dana, Jr., 
Grover, Edwin M., . 
Gurney, Thomas L. D., 
Hunnewell, James M., 
Luther, Benjamin S., 
Stetson, George W., 
Bacon, Robert, 
Cushing, Henry S., . 



8th Mass., H, 



D. M., 
D. M, 
D. M., 
D. M., 

S. S. 

s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 
s. s. 

1st Class, 
1st do. 



1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

3d 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



S. S., 



49, 50, 44 

47, 48, 44 

48, 49, 45 

50, 50, 49 
46, 47, 43 
44, 46, 42 
48, 49, 45 

46, 47, 50 
44, 47, 45 

47, 46, 42 
44, 46, 43 

44, 48, 43 
46, 50, 46 

45, 47, 44 
44, 48, 42 

46, 46, 45 

46, 47, 44 

44, 46, 42 

45, 46, 44 

47, 46, 44 
45, 46, 43 
45, 48, 45 
44, 46, 44 
44, 47, 42 
44, 46, 42, 
44, 46, 46 
44, 42, - 

43, 48, - 

42, 42, - 

44, 44, - 
44,47, - 

43, 46, - 
20,21 
21,22 
20,21 
21,21 
19,20 
19, 20 
18,19 
18, 19 
19,21 
21,21 
18, 18 
21,22 
20,20 
19,20 
18, 19 
18,20 
21,22 
19,20 
18, 19 
20,20 
18,18 
19,20 
15, 15 

44,43, - 
43,46, - 

45, 43, - 
43,45, - 
44,43, - 
45, 43, - 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 4 
Sharpshooters, . . . .23 
First class marksmen, . . 13 



Second class marksmen, . . 22 
Third class marksman, . . 1 
Total —63 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



175 



COMPANY D, FIRST CORPS CADETS. 



Bank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Private, 
Sergeant, 



Private, 



Lieutenant, 
Private, 

Corporal, 
Private, 



Musician, 
Private, 



1st Sergeant 
Corporal, 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Private, 
(< 

Corporal, 
Private, 



Musician, 
Private, 
Corporal, 
Private, 



Corporal, 
Private, 



Parker, Maurice W., 
Upton, Joshua D., . 
Aldrich, Albert C, . 
Cross, Charles H., 2d, 
Damon, John L., Jr., 
Edson, John W., 
Estey, Harold W., . 
Eallon, John B., Jr., 
Johnson, Charles H., 
Loud, Charles E., . 
Lovis, Frederick S., 
Newhal], Charles A., 
Newhall, Elbridge K., 
Sargeant, Edward H., 
Sawyer, Philip B., . 
Sturtevant, Roy E., 
Williams, Webster F., 
Wiswall, Dexter B., 
Adams, Elmer H., . 
Adams, Walter A., . 
Cram, Albert B., 
Dickinson, Alexander, 
Dockham, Paul R., . 
Fox, Walter B.C., . 
Hoyt, Edward H., . 
Jenkins, Lawrence W., 
Rollins, Charles H., 
Simmons, William S., 
Taylor, Harry M., . 
Whitney, Travis H., 
Wingate, Edward L., 
Beach, Sylvester J., . 
Blake, Dehon, . 
Blake, Francis M., . 
Blanchard, William R., 
Brannan, Frank D., 
Conrad, Harry M., . 
Fletcher, Lawrence B., 
Hall, Edward K., . 
Lincoln, William E., 
Mackinnon, Bergan A., 
Noyes, Curtis D., 
Richardson, Willough by F. 
Willcutt, Edward F., 
Willcutt, Joseph N., 
Knight, John C, 
Brewer, James, 



D. M., 
D. M., 

S. S., 

S. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 
s. s., 

1st Class, 
1st do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

1st 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

2d 

S. S., 

3d Class, 



48, 49, 48 

49, 48, 48 
44, 46, 44 
44, 46, 47 
44, 47, 43 

44, 46, 46 
47, 46, 46 

45, 47, 49 
47, 46, 43 

44, 47, 42 
47, 49, 46 

45, 46, 44 
45, 50, 43 

44, 47, 44 

45, 46, 44 
45, 47, 44 
44, 47, 47 
44, 46, 44 

42, 43, - 
42,48, - 
44, 45, - 

43.44, - 

43, 45, - 

42.45, - 
43, 43, - 
42,43, - 

42, 46, - 

43, 42, - 
43,43, - 
42,47, - 
43, 42, - 

18,18 
18, 19 
18, 19 
18,19 
21,22 
20,21 
20,21 
18, 19 
18, 18 
18,20 
20,21 
19,20 
19,21 
18, 19 

15, 19 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 2 
Sharpshooters, . ... 17 
First class marksmen, . . 13 



Second class marksmen, . . 14 

Third class marksman, . . 1 

Total, 



47 



FIELD AND STAFF, SECOND CORPS CADETS. 



Major, 


Fitz, Andrew, . 




o. o., 


44, 47, 44 


Lieutenant, 


Robertson, Robert, . 


_ 


S. S., 


47, 47, 43 


Lieut. Colonel, . 


Peck, Walter F., 


- 


2d Class, 


21,22 


Lieutenant, 


Titus, Harry A., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


a 


Vaughn, Ira, . 


- 


2d do. 


18,18 


it 


Sturgis, B. F., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 



176 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 



FIELD AND STAFF, SECOND CORPS CADETS — Concluded. 



Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 
Sergeant Major, 
Drum Major, 
Lieutenant, 
Chaplain, . 
Major, 


Burding, W. A., 
Leach, H. R., . 
Lee, H. W., . 
Maloon, E. A., . 
Prescott, E. J., . 
Voss, J. W., . : 


8th Mass., E, 


3d Class, 
1st do. 
1st do. 
3d do. 
S. S., 
3d Class, 


- 



Sharpshooters, . 
First class marksmen, 
Second class marksmen, 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



4 
— 12 



COMPANY A, SECOND CORPS CADETS. 



Lieutenant, 




Sergeant, . 
1st Sergeant, 


Corporal, 

«« 


• 


(« 




<< 




<< 




Private, 


. 


«« 




n 




<( 




u 




<( 




Q. M. Serge 


ant, . 


Private, 


, . 


«< 




(< 


. 


.«( 




«« 




«< 




<< 




<« 


. 


« 




<< 




Sergeant, 


• 


Private, 


• 


<( 




« 




« 


• 



Symonds, George E , 
Symonds, Charles H., 
Blinn, George W., . 
Carlin, Edward P., . 
Ellery, Frank B., . 
Hodgkins, Frank H., 
Hooper, Arthur K., . 
Strout, Frederick E., 
Belyea, Albert T., . 
Brown, Edmund M., Jr., 
Cleveland, Charles H., 
Draper, George, 
Folsom, Fred B., 
Folsom, Henry D., . 
Handy, Charles C, . 
Hayford, Charles E., 
McBain, John W., . 
Norton, Henry W., . 
Peek, Charles A., 
Sutton, Richard, 
Ward, William G., . 
Foley, Andrew J., . 
Rice, Frederic E., . 
Ferrin, George W., . 
Phillips, Harry J., . 
Phillips, Percival, . 
Roberts Frederic L., 
Robertson, Alexander, 

Staples, Walter I., . 
Staples, William A., 
Whittaker, George R., 



8th Mass., K, 



8th Mass., K, 



8th Mass., 
E and F. 



D.M., 


S. S 


• , 


1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


S. S 


• > 


1st Class, 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 



45, 46, 43 
47, 46, 44 
43,46, - 
45,46, - 

44, 44, - 

45, 44, - 
45, 44, - 
43,44,-- 

19,21 
19,21 
19,22 
19, 19 
23,23 
19,21 
18,19 
22,22 
22,23 
20,22 
18,22 
19) 20 
19,20 
17, 19 
16, 16 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters, . . . . 2 

First class marksmen, . . 8 

Second class marksmen, . . 17 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



38 



COMPANY B, SECOND CORPS CADETS. 



Corporal, . 
Lieutenant, 



Fowler, F. C, . 
Miles, A. R., . 
Burbeck, J. G., 



S. S., 

s. s., 

1st Class, 



44, 46, 44 

45, 48, 44 
42,44 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JSTo. 7. 



177 



COMPANY B, SECOND CORPS CADETS — Concluded. 







Service In U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Corporal, . 


Cilley, B. it., . 


_ 


1st Class, 


42,43, - 


Sergeant, . 


Fogg, E. A., . 




- 


1st do. 


44, 42, - 


Musician, . 


Mahew, H. N., 




- 


1st do. 


46,46, - 


Private, 


Robinson, J. A., 




- 


1st do. 


42,45, - 


<( 


Stanley, F. A., . 




- 


1st do. 


43,42, - 


Sergeant, . 


Brown, D. L., . 




- 


2d do. 


18,20 


Private, 


Ellis, S. P., 




- 


2d do. 


22,22 


«< 


Johnson, A. E., 




- 


2d do. 


20, 18 


Corporal, . 


Maxfield, R. E., 




- 


2d do. 


20, 18 


Private, 


Nickerson, A. W., 




- 


2d do. 


21,21 


• « 


Pettis, H. F., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Rea, E. C, 




- 


2d do. 


18,19 


Private, 


Sears, John, 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Whipple, Walter, 




- 


2d do. 


18,20 


Private, 


Gifford, R. H., . 




- 


3d do. 


16,17 


«< 


Toye, L. H., . 




- 


3d do. 


15,18 


Corporal, . 


Cressy, G. S., . 




- 


3d do. 


- 


Private, 


Fallon, J. H., . 




- 


3d do. 


- 


«( 


French, 0. B., . 




- 


2d do. 


_ 


cc 


Gifford, C. P., . 




- 


2d do. 


_ 


a 


Putney, G. W., 




- 


3d do. 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Redmond, E. T., 




- 


2d do. 


- 


Private, 


Torr, J. M., . 




- 


3d do. 


- 


Captain, 


Webb, A. N., . 




- 


2d do. 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Graham, E. T., 




- 


S. S., 


- 


Private, 


MacLean, C. J., 




- 


2d Class, 


- 


<( 


Woodman, E. F., 




- 


2d do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, .... 3 
First class marksmen, . . 6 
Second class marksmen, . . 15 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



6 
8 
— 38 



COMPANY C, SECOND CORPS CADETS. 



Lieutenant, 
Private, 

Captain, 

Sergeant, 

Private,. 

1st Sergeant, 

Lieutenant, 

Private, 



Q. M. Sergeant, 
Corporal, . 
Private, 



Bugler, 
Private, 



Corporal, 

Private, 
<< 

Sergeant, 
Private, 



Perkins, Frank S., . 
Evans, Charles H., . 
Martin, Oscar C, 
Spencer, John E., . 
Stephenson, Albion, Jr., 
Jackman, Chas. M., Jr., 
Mann, William A., . 
Peach, Harry R., 
Phippen, Fred T., . 
South, Walter E., . 
Woodward, Harold F., 
Bennett, Frank P., Jr., 
Brown, Horace M., 
Burns, Frank G., 
Clay, William. H., 
Dyer, Herman G., 
Earp, Edwin, . 
Ebsen, Anton, . 
Foster, Arthur W., 
Gilpin, John B., 
Grey, Clarence N., 
Gross, Charles E., 
Hall, Harry M., 
Harris, John H., 
Hewitt, Starr C, Jr 



D. M., 


S. S 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



46, 48, 42 
45, 46, 45 
45, 49, 42 

47, 47, 44 
44, 46, 44 
42, 44, - 
46,44, - 
44,47, - 

43.44, - 
44,46, - 

42.45, - 
18,19 
20,20 
21,21 
19,20 
18, 18 
18, 18 
19,20 
18,18 
21, "22 
20,22 
20,21 
18,19 
18,20 
20,23 



178 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 



COMPANY C, SECOND CORPS CADETS — Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Bane. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Sergeant, . 


Hoyt, W. Everett, . 




2d Class, 


20,20 


Private, 


Hurley, Timothy E., 


- 


2d do. 


21,23 


Color Sergeant, . 


Nourse, Henry P., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Otte, Henry, 




- 


2d do. 


18,19 


Private, 


Petrie, Edwin W., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


t< 


Phalen, William C, 




- 


2d do. 


21, 19 


<< 


Rice, William V., 




- 


2d do. 


18,22 


<( 


Saul, Ernest T., 




- 


2d do. 


21,22 


u 


Stuart, J. Leslie, 




- 


2d do. 


18,18 


«( 


Taylor, James R., 




- 


2d do. 


21,21 


(( 


Upton, John M., 




- 


2d do. 


21,21 


«< 


Welsh. William C, 




- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


cc 


Wheeler, Alfred W., 




- 


3d do. 


17,17 


(( 


Drinkwater, Ralph B., 


- 


S. S., 


_ 


a 


Kingsley, Forrester, 


- 


3d do. 


- 


«« 


Seaver, Edwin E., . 


- 


2d do. 


_ 


<« 


Stuart, Charles F., . 


- 


2d do. 


— 


Distinguished marksman, . . 1 


Third class marksmen, 


. 3 


Sharpshooters, .... 5 


Unqualified member, 


. 1 


First class marksmen, . . 6 


Total, .... 


. —43 


Second class marksmen, . . 27 






COMPANY D, SECOND CORPS* CADETS. 


Lieutenant, 


Clark, J. N., . 




S. S., 


45, 46, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Mclnnis, J. W., 




8th Mass., H, 


s. s., 


48, 47, 45 


Captain, 


Ropes, C. F;, . 




- 


s. s., 


46, 48, 45 


Sergeant, . 


Semple, Frank, 




8th Mass., H, 


s. s., 


47, 48, 45 


Private, 


Wade, R. C, . 




- 


S.S., 


47, 49, 44 


«< 


Ankatel, W. J., 




- 


1st Class, 


43,46, - 


a 


Barry, J. G., 




- 


1st do. 


43,47, - 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Newhall. E. L., 




- 


1st do. 


45, 45, - 


Private, 


Ropes, P. H., . 




- 


1st do. 


42,45, - 


«« 


Sutherland, G. F., 




- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


<< 


Aylward, D. A., 




- 


2d do. 


20,21 


«< 


Bell, Harry, 




- 


2d do. 


18,19 


(< 


Carpenter, W. E., 




- 


2d do. 


20,21 


Corporal, . 


Curtis, 0. L., . 




8th Mass., H, 


2d do. 


21,21 


Private, 


Gamble, D. E., 




- 


2d do. 


19,23 


<< 


Gray, W. P., . 




- 


2d do. 


21, 23 


«« 


Gould, J. N., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Hebert, A. L., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


«< 


Herrick, R. F., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Corporal, . 


Harlev, T. S., . 




- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Private, 


Lent, H. M., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


K 


Lundgren, W. S., 




- 


2d do. 


21,21 


Sergeant, . 


McCue, F. W.,. 




8th Mass., H, 


2d do. 


20, 18 


Private, 


Merrill, G. H , . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(i 


Newhall, C. E., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


« 


Newhall, H. 0., 




- 


2d do. 


18,20 


1st Sergeant, 


Parker, P. A., . 




8th Mass., H, 


2d do. 


21,20 


Private, 


Pitman, E. F., . 




- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


ti 


Porter, C. A , . 




- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


Corporal, . 


Pollock, R. E., 




- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


Private, 


Waire, E. R., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<( 


Wheeler, F. W., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«< 


White, H. J., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Bugler, 


Dow, F. E., . 






3d do. 


18, 16 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



179 



COMPANY D, SECOND CORPS CADETS- Concluded. 



Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Kegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 
<i 

(< 

Bugler, 
Sergeant, . 
Private, 
Lieutenant, 
Private, 




Graham, F. W., 
Larcom, C. E., . 
Pack, E. L., . 
Almy, C. B., . 
Cushman, R. W., 
Ingalls, E. P., . 
Perkins, H. S.,. 
Willard, M. D., 




- 


3d Class, 
3d do. 
3d do. 
S. S., 

s. s., 

3d Class, 
1st do. 
S. S., 


18, 17 
16, 15 
17,17 



Sharpshooters, .... 8 
First-class marksmen, . . 6 
Second class marksmen, . . 23 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified member, 
Total, . 



5 
1 
-43 



FIELD AND STAFF, NAVAL BRIGADE. 



Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 
Volunteers, 


Class. 


Scores. 






1898. 






1901. 


Lieutenant, 


Richards, John B., . 


_ 


D.M., 


48, 46, 44 


Captain, 


Buffinton, George R. H., 


Prairie, Ka- 
tahdin. 


S. S 


•» 


45, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Jones, Gardner L, . 


Lehigh, Jason, 


S. S 




45, 48, 48 


(< 


Lincoln, Jonathan T., 


- 


1st Class, 


43,44, - 


<< 


Armstrong, Thomas R., . 


Catskill, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Chief Bugler, 


Bergonzoni, Guyton R., . 


Catskill, 


2d 


do. 


21,22 


Pay Yeoman, 


Burr, Bronson S., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Lieutenant, 


Eldredge, David G., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


<< 


Marshall, James, 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,22 


Lt. Commander, 


Merritt, Silas V , 


Lehigh, 


2d 


do. 


22,23 


Ensign, 


Prouty, Thomas S., 


Catskill, 


2d 


do. 


20,22 


Lieutenant, 


Sughrue, Dennis F., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


a 


Talbot, Herbert C, . 


- 


2d 


do. 


21, 22 


Apothecary, 


Weed, William H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,21 


(« 


Blair, Orland R., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,17 


Equip. Yeoman, 


McEwen, William H., Jr., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


Master at Arms, . 


Belcher, Chester S., . 


Prairie, 


S. S 




_ 


Lt. Commander, 


Dillaway, James H., Jr., . 


Lehigh, Sem- 
inole. 


s. s 


•> 


- 


<{ 


Edgar, William P., . 


Catskill, 


s. s 


•> 


— 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 
Sharpshooters, .... 5 
First class marksman, . . 1 



Second class marksmen, 
Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



10 
2 
— 19 



HEADQUARTERS DIVISION, NAVAL 


BRIGADE. 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Jones, Edward L., . 


Lehigh, 


S. S., 


44, 47, 45 


Quartermaster, . 


Bodge, Leander C, . 


- 


1st Class, 


42,42, - 


Signalman, 


Mahoney, John T., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Manton, Alfred H., . 


Lehigh, 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


Signalman, 


McDonald, William H. V., 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


<< 


Ney, John E., . 


- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


Quartermaster, . 


Atwood, George L., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 



180 



ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPOET. 



[Jan. 



HEADQUARTERS DIVISION, NAVAL BRIGADE -Concluded. 







Service In U. S. 






Scores. 


Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 


Class. 






1898. 






1901. 


Machinist, . 


Black, Robert, . 




2d Class, 


18, 18 


Chief Q. M., 


Borden, Raymond D., 


Prairie, 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Seaman, 


Broderick, Arthur C, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Signalman, 


Buckley, Thomas L., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,18 


Seaman, 


Edmunds, David D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Signalman, 


Godley, Clarence B., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Jennings, Christopher D., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


Chief G. M., 


O'Hearn, John, 


Inca, 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Machinist, . 


Sealey, John H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Signalman, 


Solomon, James N., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


Seaman, 


Wyman, Alfred M., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,20 


Signalman, 


Young, Edwin R., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Seaman, 


Barnes, "Warren S., 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,18 


Fireman, 


Collins, Jeremiah F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


c< 


Dunn, "William F., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


Machinist, . 


Keen, George W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


Fireman, . 


Pratt, Ronald H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


Water Tender, . 


Pitcher, Charles W., 


Catskill, 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


Fireman, . 


Quinn, "William, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


«< 


Robinson, Alphonso A., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


17,18 


<< 


Campbell, John E., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


- 


« 


Reading, Malcom A., 


- 


2d 


do. 


— 



Sharpshooter, .... 1 
First class marksmen, . . 5 
Second class marksmen, . . 15 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



3 
— 32 





COMPANY A, NAVAL BRIGADE. 




Bos'n Mate, 


Fisher, George C, . 


i Lehigh, 


S.S., 


45, 48, 46 


Chief B. M., 


McLaughlin, William J., 


Lehigh, 


s. s., 


44, 47, 46 


Seaman, 


Turner, Robert W., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


Quartermaster, . 


Allen, Frank L., 


Prairie, 


1st Class, 


42, 44, - 


Lieutenant, 


Bittues, Arno A., 


Prairie, 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Seaman, 


Brennan, Joseph P., 


- 


2d do. 


18,19 


(< 


Bullens, George A., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


<< 


Follansbee, Charles A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 22 


<« 


Jones, Chester E., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<< 


Leary, Charles A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


a 


Nee, Patrick J., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Ensign. 


Pierce, Bradford H., 


- 


2d do. 


22, 22 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Ratigan, William A., 


Lehigh, 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Coxswain, . 


Sanborn, Morton F., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


Seaman, 


Simons, Walter A., . 


Prairie, 


2d do. 


18,21 


Lieutenant, 


Sughrue, Daniel H., 


Prairie, 


2d do. 


21,23 


Seaman, 


Weeks, Harry A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Baker, Alexander J., 


Lehigh, 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<i 


Benson, James F., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Bullens, Charles E., 


- 


3d do. 


17, 19 


«< 


Collins, Richard J., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Coman, Harry H., . 


- 


3d do. 


17, 18 


Cook, . 


Dearborn, Harry N., 


Texas, 


3d do. 


15, 15 


Seaman, 


Eberts, Robert J., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


<( 


Edwards, Bertram C, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 19 


<< 


Furlong, Nicholas J., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Gibbs, Joseph W., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


H 


Gifford, John L., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Holmes, George L., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


it 


Humphries, Charles C, . 


Prairie, 


3d do. 


16, 17 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JSTo. 7. 



181 





COMPANY A, NAVAL BRIGADE - Concluded 




Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898- 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Seaman, 


Madden, James F., . 




3d Class, 


15, 15 




* . . 


Malm, George P., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 




* . . 


McGuirke, John C, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 




* . . 


McKenna, John C, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 




' . . 


Murray, Joseph J., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 




' . . 


Norton, Patrick I., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,17 




* . . 


Quinn, William J., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 




' . . 


Reynolds, William F., 


- 


3d do. 


15,17 




* . . 


Rice, James F., 


- 


3d do. 


17,20 




' . 


Ross, Henry, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


Quartermaster, . 


Sughrue, Frank A., . 


- 


3d do. 


16,17 


Bugler, 


Viall, Charles R., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


Seaman, 


Williamson, Edward E., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


<< 


Bishop, George A., . 


- 


3d do. 


- 


Bos'n Mate, 


Chandler, Robert A., 


- 


1st do. 


- 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Dennie, Horace, 


- 


2d do. 


- 


Coxswain, . 


Scully, George H., . 


Prairie, 


1st do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, .... 3 
First class marksmen, . . 4 
Second class marksmen, . . 13 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



27 
12 



59 



COMPANY B, NAVAL BRIGADE. 



Gunner's Mate, . 


Cooley, George P.. . 


1st Mass., B, 


D. M., 


48, 49, 48 


Bos'n Mate, 


French, Frederic H., 


- 


S.S., 


47, 46, 48 


Quartermaster, . 


Kilmer, Charles H., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 46, 47 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Manson, Gilbert T., . 


- 


s. s., 


48, 47, 46 


Seaman, 


Robbins, Herbert S., 


Lehigh, 


s. s., 


45, 46. 43 


Ensign, 


Cartwright, David J., 


- 


1st Class, 


42,45', - 


Bos'n Mate, 


Lewis, William A., . 


- 


1st do. 


43,44, - 


Coxswain, . 


Pray, Dudley M., . 


- 


1st do. 


43,44, - 


Chief B. M., 


Stevens, Fred A., 


- 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


Seaman, 


Bixby, Edwin R., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Caddigan, John J., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


«< 


Coo, John B. B., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


Bayman, . 


Dorsey, Michael J , . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 


Lieutenant, - 


Goodridge, Daniel M., 


Sylvia, 


2d do. 


22 


22 


Seaman, 


Harper, George E., . 


- 


2d do. 


20 


19 


<< 


McGregor, Charles P., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


c< 


Pearson, Charles E., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


20 


a 


Peters, George H., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


18 


tt 


Pierce, Herbert A , . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


tt 


Porter, Frank A J., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


M 


Rogers, William H., 


- 


2d do. 


.19 


21 


tt 


Shaw, H. Earl, 


- 


2d do. 


22 


21 


Coxswain, . 


Shortwell, Ernest H., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


18 


Seaman, 


Tierney, William T., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


it 


Wood, George E., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


19 


it 


Curley, Hugh F., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 


tt 


Curtis, Charles C, . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


17 


tt 


Daggett, John F., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


tt 


Davis, John L., 


- 


3d do. 


17 


16 


it 


Dearborn, Harry L., 


- 


3d do. 


17 


17 


a 


Emerson, Freeman 0., . 


- 


3d. do. 


15 


16 


tt 


Hadlock, Frank B., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


tt 


Hadlock, William G., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


15 


<( 


McLeod, Daniel A., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


17 


tt 


Morris, Almon H., . 


— 


3d do. 


17 


18 



182 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



COMPANY B, NAVAL BRIGADE -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


1901. 


Seaman, 


O'Connor, Jeremiah J., . 




3d Class, 


15, 16 


Bugler, 


Odiorne, Howard E., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


Seaman, 


O'Malley, James J., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,17 


«« 


Rich, Arthur W., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 17 


«< 


Shaw, Ralph R., 


- 


3d do. 


15,15 


<< 


Shorrock, James T., 




3d do. 


19,17 


<( 


Smith, Edmund A., . 


- 


3d do. 


17, 15 


<( 


Thomas, Burton L., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


<( 


Watson, William P., 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Bartlett, George B., . 


- 


3d do. 


- 


<< 


Lewis, Charles F., . 


1st Mass., C, 


S. S., 


- 


<< 


McSwain, Magnus A., 


- 


S. s., 


- 


<( 


Pridham, Henry M. K., . 


- 


2d Class, 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Dyer, Frederick M., 


Lehigh, 


2d do. 


— 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters, .... 6 

First class marksmen, . . 4 

Second class marksmen, . . 18 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



20 
5 
— 54 



COMPANY C, NAVAL BRIGADE. 



Lieutenant, 


Felton, Lewis E., 


Catskill, 


D. 


M., 


46, 48, 48 


Chief B. M., 


Adams, George B., . 


Catskill, 


S. S., 


46, 46, 45 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Stowe, Edwin A., . 


Prairie, 


1st Class, 


42,43, - 


Bayman, 


Blankenburg, Charles H., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


Seaman, 


Duffy, Thomas F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


t. 


Dunn, Edward F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


(< 


Dunn, Richard F., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 19 


u 


Herbert, James, 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,19 


Quartermaster, . 


Keith, Edwin W., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


20,20 


Seaman, 


McKenna, Richard H., . 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


Bos'n Mate, 


Perham, Robert W., 


- 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


Seaman, 


Phillips, Daniel, 


- 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Robinson, Frederick G., . 


Gov. Russell, 


2d 


do. 


21,21 


Bos'n Mate, 


Wallace, William B., 


- 


2d 


do. 


19,21 


Seaman, 


Williams, George S., 


- 


2d 


do. 


18,20 


Coxswain, . 


Williamson, Frederick R., 

Jr. 
Woodman, Robert W., . 


Prairie, 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


Bugler, 


_ 


2d 


do. 


18,21 


Seaman, 


Bowers, Fred W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


<< 


Brennan, Michael J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


«< 


Buckley, William A., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


k 


Caswell, Royal H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<< 


Chase, Charles H., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 15 


ii 


Freeman, James, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


t< 


Geary, James F., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


(< 


Gilbakian, John, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<< 


Hall, Herbert, . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 17 


«< 


Hourihan, Michael J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<( ' 


Hingley, John W., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


(« 


Hurley, Timothy J., 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 


<< 


Kee, Walter 0., 


Gov. Russell, 


3d 


do. 


16, 17 


<< 


Kenney, Daniel J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 15 


<( 


Lanagan, Frank W., 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 


«< 


Laskey, Henry J., . 


- 


3d 


do. 


16, 16 




McSweeney, William H., 

Jr. 
Molton, Robert, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15,16 


Quartermaster, . 
Seaman, 


- 


3d 


do. 


15, 16 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



183 



COMPANY C, NAVAL BRIGADE -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 

1898. 


Class. 


1901. 


Seaman, 


O'Brien, William J., 




3d Class, 


16,17 


(< 


, 


Parsons, Archibald, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 17 


<< 


, # 


Smith, Frank T., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 15 


Cook, . 


. 


Tashjiani, Harry, 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


Seaman, 


. 


Thayer, George E., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


a 


. 


Trainer, Thomas L., 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


(( 


, 


Walters, James H., . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 18 


(< 


. 


Whitehead, Harry, . 


- 


3d do. 


15, 16 


Lieutenant, 


Parker, Charles H., . 


Catskill, Mar- 
cellus. 


S. S., 




Distinguished marksman, . . 1 Third class marksmen, 


. 26 


Sharpshooters, . ... 2 Unqualified member, 


. 1 


First class marksman, . . 1 


Total, .... 


. —45 


Second class marksmen, . . 14 






COMPANY E, NAV. 


AL BRIGADE. 





Chief B. M., 

Seaman, 

Coxswain, . 

Ensign, 

Quartermaster, 

Lieutenant, 

Bos'ns Mate, 
Seaman, 



Coxswain, . 
Quartermaster, 
Gunner's Mate, 
Seaman, 
Bos'ns Mate, 
Seaman, 



Bugler, 
Seaman, 



Cary, Arthur F., 
Cary, Ralph H., 
Clark, Charles H., . 
Corrao, Alva G., 
Newhall, Howard W., 
Smith, Herbert L., . 
Turnbull, Fred H., . 
Abbott, Ernest D., . 
Blethen, Walter H.,. 
DeMeritt, William M., 
Duffy, James A., 
Peale, Ernest R., 
Sawyer, William G., 
Shaw, Charles E., . 
Shuman, Joseph H., 
Andersen, Charles L., 
Barry, Edward J., . 
Blomgren, Axell T., 
Bodkin, Michael T.,. 
Berdge, Rodman E., 
Cloran, William F.,. 
Devitt, George E., . 
Evans, Daniel N., . 
Geyer, Julius C, 
Ham, Kelley P., 
Hamill, John H., 
Hamilton, George, . 
Holder, Walter S., . 
Hughes, Ernest O., . 
Jones, James E., 
Jones, Wesley G., . 
Jones, William M., . 
Long, Edward W., . 
Long, Lucius S., 
Long, Elmer F., 
Mansfield, Jonathan A., 
McCarthy, Clarence T., 
McElroy, James, 
Murchison, Charles P., 
Powell, John L , 
Purington, William H., 



Catskill, 
Signal Service 

Prairie, 

Catskill, 

Prairie, 



East Boston, 
Catskill, 



Gov. Russell, 



D. M , 


S. S 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




s. s 




1st Class, 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


1st 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



46, 47, 45 
44, 46, 42 
46, 46, 44 
48, 49, 44 
44, 47, 46 
44, 46, 42 
46, 47, 43 
43, 42, - 

43.42, - 

45.43, - 
42,45, - 
43, 43, - 

43.42, - 

43.43, - 
43,42, - 

18,21 
18,19 
18,20 
18, 18 
21,23 
21, 21 
20,20 
18,20 
18, 18 
18, 19 
18, 18 
19,20 
19,19 
19,22 
18, 18 
20,21 
18, 19 
22,22 

18, 19 
20,20 
20,21 

19, 19 
18, 18 
18, 19 
18,18 
18,20 



184 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY B, NAVAL BRIGADE -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


1901. 


Seaman, 


Ricker, Guy H., 




2d Class, 


21,22 


<« 


Robinson, Edward L., 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 


<« 


Rodland, Louis A., . 


- 


2d do. 


20,21 


« 


Tate, William F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


<< 


White, Charles E., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,21 


(< 


White, William A., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


<< 


Whorling, Charles F., 


Catskill, 


2d do. 


18,21 . 


<< 


Barry, Michael J., . 


- 


3d do. 


17, 18 


Bayman, . 


Chisholm, John L., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 19 


Seaman, 


Edwards, Joseph B., 


- 


3d do. 


17,18 


<< 


Keene, Charles L., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,16 


M 


McAdoo, Howard P., 


- 


3d do. 


17, 20 


t( 


McEneany, Thomas F., . 


- 


3d do. 


15,18 


« 


Philbrick, William A., . 


- 


3d do. 


16, 16 


it 


Potter, Fred H., 


- 


3d do. 


16,17 


(t 


Chisholm, Everett C, 


- 


2d do. 


- 


u 


Smith, Walter H., . 


- 


2d do. 


— 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 
Sharpshooters, .... 6 
First class marksmen, . . 8 



Second class marksmen, 
Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



35 

8 
— 58 



COMPANY P, NAVAL BRIGADE. 



Seaman, 


Barry, W. L., . 




S. S., 


46, 47, 43 


«< 


Benton, A. T., . 




- 


s. s., 


44, 48, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Borden, C. N., . 




Coast Signal, 
Lehigh. 


s. s., 


46, 47, 46 


Ensign, 


Deane, M. I., . 




Lehigh, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


Quartermaster, . 


Jeff, H. W., . 




- 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


Coxswain, . 


Leonard, J. F. A., . 




- 


s. s., 


46, 47, 43 


Bos'n Mate, 


Merritt, W. P., 




Prairie, 


s. s., 


49, 46, 42 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Nelson, J. T., . 




- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


Seaman, 


Paquin, J. A., . 




Coast Signal, 


s. s., 


46, 46, 46 


a 


Paquin, T. N., . 




- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


Chief B. M.', ! 


Young, J. M., Jr., . 




Lehigh, 


s. s., 


47, 46, 44 


Seaman, 


Ankarstran, W. B., . 




- 


1st Class, 


45,45, - 


n 


Davis, B. V., . 




- 


1st do. 


47,46, - 


u 


Foster, C. E., . 




- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


a 


Macomber, A. A., . 




- 


1st do. 


42,43, - 


«< 


McQuillan, A. W., 




- 


1st do. 


42, 45, - 


<« 


Newell, George C, J 


r., . 


- 


1st do. 


43,44, - 


<< 


Rigby, J., 




- 


1st do. 


45, 42, - 


it 


Snow, W. E., . 




- 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


(< 


Sullivan, G. E., 




- 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


<( 


Sweeny, J. F., . 




- 


1st do. 


43,44, - 


<< 


Sherman, W. A., 




- 


1st do. 


44, 44, - 


Coxswain, . 


Warburton, J., 




_ 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Seaman, 


Abbott, C. J., . 




- 


2d do. 


20,20 


it 


Ankarstran, J. D., . 




- 


2d do. 


21,21 


a 


Bourdon, E., . 




- 


2d do. 


20, 18 


a 


Booth, W. E., . 




- 


2d do. 


19, IS 


a 


Britton, E , 




46th U. S., I, 


2d do. 


20, 19 


M 


Connors, D. F., 




- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


<( 


Cunningham, J., 




- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


Coxswain, . 


Dalton, H., 




Texas, 


2d do. 


23, 20 


Seaman, 


Donovan, W. F., 




- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


Bugler, 


Gale, C. E., 




- 


2d do. 


22,20 


Seaman, 


Gifford, A. L., . 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



185 



COMPANY P, NAVAL BRIGADE -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 


Class. 


1901. 


Seaman, 


Grenfell, W. E., 




2d Class, 


22,22 


Cook, 


Grinnell, G. H., 




- 


2d do. 


20, 18 


Seaman, 


Kirkham, T. H., 




- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Korzneski, E., . 




Prairie, 


2d do. 


22,21 


Seaman, 


Loran, H. D., . 




- 


2d do. 


22, 19 


<< 


Marsden, W. J., 




- 


2d do. 


20,20 


<( 


Mills, C. A., . 




- 


2d do. 


20, 19 


<< 


Nelson, W. H., 




- 


2d do. 


21,20 


Bayman, 


O'Connell, J. E., 




- 


2d do. 


20, 18 


Seaman, 


Peterson, H. H., 




_ 


2d do. 


19, 18 


(< 


Sterling, T., Jr., 




- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


«« 


Shea, D. J., 1st, 




- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


(< 


Skahan, , . 




- 


2d do. 


21, 19 


a 


Slattery, L. F., 




- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


it 


Thompson, C. S , 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


a 


Thompson, W. E., 




- 


2d do. 


20,20 


a 


Wakem, J. E., 




- 


2d do. 


21,21 


it 


Walsh, J. H , . 




- 


2d do. 


20,20 


Bos'n Mate, 


Wilson, J. H., Jr., 




- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Seaman, 


McGuinness, E. A., 




- 


3d do. 


16, 15 


«< 


Shea, D. J., 2d, 




- 


3d do. 


18,17 


Lieutenant, 


Beattie, W. H., 




- 


S. S., 


- 


Seaman, 


Fuller, C. E., . 




- 


3d Class, 


- 


«( 


Hadfield, S. J., 




- 


1st do. 


- 


M 


Jackson, A., 




- 


1st do. 


— 



Sharpshooters, . . . .12 
First class marksmen, . . 14 
Second class marksmen, . . 30 



Third class marksmen, 
Total, . 



59 





COMPANY G, 


NAVAL BRIGADE. 




Lieutenant, 


Baudoin, Edmund E., 




D. M., 


49, 50, 50 


Coxswain, . 


Ardrey, F. C, . 


- 


S. S., 


46, 50, 45 


Chief B. M., 


Bates, Edwin B., 




Catskill, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


Seaman, 


Byrne, James, . 




Gov. Russell, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 43 


a 


Farrell, James, 




- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


a 


Howland, R. A., 




- 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


Coxswain, . ' 


McDonald, J. G., 




_ 


s. s., 


46, 46, 42 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Peirce, W. C, . 




_ 


s. s., 


48, 48, 43 


Ensign, 


Read, Ernest C, 




_ 


s. s., 


46, 46, 43 


Bos'n Mate, 


Silvia, John S., 




Prairie, 


s. s., 


44, 46, 45 


Seaman, 


Silvia, D. M.. . 




- 


S. o., 


48, 46, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Thomas, A. Ernest, 




Gov. Russell, 


o. S ., 


45, 50, 48 


Bos'n Mate, 


Walton, J. F., . 




- 


S. s., 


44, 46, 43 


Seamen, 


Bradshaw, Geo. L., 




- 


1st Class, 


45, 43, - 


<« 


Carrier, A., 




- 


1st do. 


44, 42, - 


<« 


Higham, J. H., 




- 


1st do. 


43,42, - 


a 


Moore, J. J.,* . 




_ 


1st do. 


42,43, - 


Quartermaster, . 


Rounsevell, S. H., 




_ 


1st do. 


43,42, - 


Seaman, 


Records, Geo. E., 




- 


1st do. 


42, 43, - 


tt 


Reed, F. A., . 




_ 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Quartermaster, . 


Sohlgren, Chas. R., 




- 


1st do. 


43,44, - 


Seaman, 


Winsper, Wm. H., 




- 


1st do. 


44,46, - 


Gunner's Mate, . 


Counsell, J., Jr., 




Gov. Russell, 


2d do. 


21,22 


Seaman, 


Claudino, M. C, 




_ 


2d do. 


18, 21 


Bayman, . 


Clarke, A. R., . 




_ 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Seaman, 


Dillingham, F. O., 




_ 


2d do. 


18, 21 


a 


Enos, J. M., 




— 


2d do. 


18,20 



186 



ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S KEPOKT. 



[Jan. 



COMPANY G, NAVAL BRIGADE - Concluded , 



Rank. 



Xamk. 



Service in U. 8. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Bugler, 
Seaman, 



Foley, Chas. A., 
Frechette, A., . 
Merrow, Chas. P., 
McCarthy, John, 
McKay, John, . 
Rose, A. E., 
Rice, H. L., 
Ricketson, E. T., 
Records, W. L., 
Ryan, John, 
Stowell, A. F., . 
Thorpe, Joseph, 
Thompson, J. W., 
Tinkham, A. C, 
Weeden, E. L., 
Fish, J. H., 
Hynes, J. H., . 
Henner, E., 
Johnson, Wm., 
Lackie, Geo. A., 
Lemaire, G., 
Morse, E. F., . 
Miller, C. A., . 
Russell, E. S., Jr., 
Tomlinson, A. E., 
Wilson, J. F., Jr., 
Foley, J. A., 



2d Class, 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


2d 


do. 


~ 



18 
20 
18 
20 
21 
20 
21 
19 
22 
20 
20 
18 
20 
22 
21 
16 
17 
17 
18 
19 
16 
18 
15 
18 
16 
16 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters, . . . .12 

First class marksmen, . . 9 

Second class marksmen, . . 21 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



11 

3 
— 57 





COMPANY H, NAVAL BRIGADE. 




Bos'n Mate, 


Adams, George T., . 




D. M., 


46, 48, 44 


Ensign, 


Barr, Walter S., 


- 


S. S., 


44, 48, 48 


Seaman, 


Brooks, Herbert A., 


- 


S. S., 


46, 46, 43 


ii 


Clark, George W., . 


- 


S. s., 


44, 46, 42 


Lieutenant, 


Cohn, William O., . 


Lehigh, 


s. s., 


45, 46, 44 


Seaman, 


GrifBng, Harrv A., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 47, 45 


<( 


Jennings, Curtis H., 


Prairie, 


s. s., 


50, 48, 45 


Chief B. M., 


Owens, William H., 


Prairie, 


s. s., 


48, 49, 45 


Seaman, 


Parsons, Frederick C, 


- 


s. s., 


46, 50, 43 


(< 


Russell, Stephen O., 


- 


s. s., 


45, 46, 42 


Quartermaster, . 


Shaw, James H., 


_ 


s. s., 


45, 46, 43 


«< 


Smith, Edwin S., 


Prairie, 


s. s., 


50, 50, 48 


Seaman, 


White, Fred L., 


_ 


s. s., 


46, 46, 45 


Barman, 


Witt, Ernest A., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 47, 47 


Seaman, 


Wood, Henry N., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 49, 43 


Bos'n Mate, 


Wripht, Alfred T., . 


- 


D. M., 


48, 48, 42 


Seaman, 


Boutin, Charles G., . 


- 


1st Class, 


44,43, - 


(< 


Dart, Ernest N., 


- 


1st do. 


44,43, - 


(< 


Graves, Rolla W., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


(< 


Paro, Louis L, . 


- 


1st do. 


42,44, - 


t< 


Sackett, Charles A., 


- 


1st do. 


46, 44, - 


<« 


Vining, Charles H., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 42, - 


Bugler, 


Atkinson, Rowland, 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


Seaman, 


Bartlett, Leon E., . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



187 



COMPANY H, NAVAL BRIGADE — Concluded. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Seaman, 



Gunner's 
Seaman, 



Mate, 



Lieutenant, 
Seaman, 



Cook, . 
Seaman, 



Coxswain, 
Seaman, 



Gunner's Mate, 



Baxter, George S., . 
Best, Walter R., 
Bliss, Nelson 0., 
Burger, Charles E, . 
Clark, Webster C, . 
Cooley, Howard J., . 
Coote, Thomas T., . 
Crocker, Charles E., 
Dexter, Jenness K., 
Fielding, Frank R., 
Flosdorf, Frederick, 
Gammie, George R., 
Hare, Charles I., 
Hitt, Robert A., 
Johnson, Thomas N., 
Kilgour, William T., 
Leach, Edward A., . 
Murray, George S., . 
Paro, Alfred A., 
Reardon, George W., 
Shumway, Frederick A., 
Smith, Charles H., . 
Thayer, Fred. G., . 
Warriner, Alford H., 
Williams, Edwin L., 
Barnard, Mark J., . 
Dwyer, Edmund M. L., 
Goodwin, Harry B., 
Rawley, Albert C, . 
Rodier, George L., . 
Wicks, Charles F., . 
Stanley, Arthur N., 
White, Daniel C, . 



Prairie, 



Gov. Russell, 



2d Class, 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


1st 


do. 


S. S 


•> 



20, 18 

18, 18 

21, 18 

21, 18 
20, 18 
20, 19 
22,22 
20, 18 

22, 22 

19, 18 
22, 19 
18,20 
20,21 
20,18 

20, 18 
19, 19 
22,20 
24,22 
21,20 
19, 19 
19, 18 

18, 19 

19, 19 

20, 19 

20, 19 
15, 17 
15, 16 
15, 16 

21, 17 
17,16 
19, 16 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 2 

Sharpshooters, . . . .15 

First class marksmen, . . 7 

Second class marksmen, . . 27 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



59 



COMPANY I, NAVAL BKIGADE. 



Lieutenant, 
Seaman, 
Bos'ns Mate, 
Quartermaster, 
Bugler, 
Bos'ns Mate, 
Seaman, 
Coxswain, . 
Gunner's Mate, 
Chief B. M., 
Seaman, 



Olding, William M., 
Ainley, Joseph H., . 
Downey, Timothy, . 
Evans, Richard, 
Flynn, John E., 
Harrington, James E., 
Hibbert, Frank, 
Murphy, Edward J., 
O'Brien, Thomas, 
Pargen, Thomas, 
Walton, Alfred P., . 
Bolger, Patrick E., . 
Boyd, William J., . 
Burke, James C, 
Connelly, William L., 
Conroy, James T., . 
Cozzins, Arthur, 
Farrar, William, 



Prairie, 



S. s 


■i 


46, 46, 44 


1st Class, 


42, 42, - 


1st 


do. 


45, 43, - 


1st 


do. 


42,43, - 


1st 


do. 


42,45, - 


1st 


do. 


44,45, - 


1st 


do. 


45, 42, - 


1st 


do. 


42, 44, - 


1st 


do. 


43, 44, - 


1st 


do. 


42,42, - 


1st 


do. 


44, 42, - 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


2d 


do. 


21, 18 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 


2d 


do. 


19, 18 


2d 


do. 


18, 18 



188 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



COMPANY I, NAVAL BRIGADE - Concluded. 



Rank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Seaman, 



Gunner's Mate, 
Seaman, 



Bay man, 
Seaman, 



Cook, . 
Seaman, 



Lieutenant, 
Ensign, 



Goodwin, Chester A. 
Kay, George F., 
Kirby, Frank J., 
Lawton, Thomas E., 
Leary, Raymond, 
Lees, Harry, 
Lewis, Robert J., 
Lomax, Joseph, 
McCarthy, Charles, 
McGrady, Joseph, Jr., 
Mulrooney, Joseph P., 
O'Connell, Francis, . 
Piatt, James, . 
Shea, James E., 
Squire, Arthur G., . 
Sullivan, Daniel, 
Swortls, Thomas F., 
Taylor, Thomas L., . 
Tobin, John T., Jr., . 
Toolan, James F., . 
Toomey, Frank, 
Turner, John S., 
Walsh, Edward^ 
Ward, Thomas, 
Welch, John J., 
Whittaker, Amos, . 
Wilkinson, Joseph V., 
Winkley, Joseph, 
Ashworth, James, . 
Flynn, Edward, 
Hanscom, Matthew, 
Harrington, Fred J., 
Henry, Walter, 
Maloney, Dennis A., 
Oliver, Henry, . 
Thibault, Louis A., Jr., 
Waldron, Michael J., 
Borden, Richard P., 
Wilcox, Miner W., . 



Prairie, 



Prairie, 



Prairie, 
Lehigh, 



2d Class, 


21, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


22, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


22, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


22, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


20, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


21, 


2d 


do. 


18, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


2d 


do. 


19, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


15, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


17, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


3d 


do. 


16, 


S. S 


• , 




s. s 


•> 





19 
19 
18 
18 
18 
21 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
21 
18 
22 
18 
18 
20 
20 
18 
19 
19 
19 
18 
18 
19 
18 
18 
18 
16 
16 
16 
15 
16 
15 
16 
16 
15 



Sharpshooters, .... 3 
First class marksmen, . . 10 
Second class marksmen, . . 35 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



9 
2 

— 59 



FIELD AND STAFF, FIRST BATTALION CAVALRY. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Sergeant, . " . 


Harrison, Christopher, . 




S. S., 


42, 42, 41 


Lieutenant, 


Hall, John W., 


- 


2d Class, 


19, 18 


(< 


Mudge, Alfred, 


- 


2d do. 


20, 20 


Sergeant, . 


Lovesey, Arthur H., 


- 


3d do. 


17, 16 


Lieutenant, 


Alexander, Winthrop, 


- 


S. S., 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Blinn, Alfred M., . 


- 


2d Class, 


" 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



189 



FIELD AND STAFF, FIRST BATTALION CAVALRY -Concluded. 



Rank. 


Name. 


Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Eegt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Lieutenant, 
Major, 
Sergeant, . 


Kerrison, John C, . 
Perrins, Wm. A., 
Walton, Albert J., . 
Ward, Fred L., 


- 


s. s., 

S.S., 

s. s., 

2d Class, 


— 



Sharpshooters, . 
Second class marksmen, 



5 | Third class marksman, 
4 Total, 



. —10 



TROOP A, FIRST BATTALION CAVALRY. 



Sergeant, . 


Barrows, John S., . 




D. M., 


47, 43, 39 


Corporal, . 


Appleton, Charles B., 


- 


S. S., 


42, 44, 41 


Lieutenant, 


Hitchcock, Frank T., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 46, 41 


Private, 


Leavitt, Frederick A., 


- 


s. s., 


43, 46, 41 


■u 


Marshall, George L., 


- ' 


s s., 


46, 47, 43 


<( 


McMaster, George R., 


- 


S.S., 


43, 46, 40 


<( 


Norman, Walter F., 


- 


s. s., 


42, 42, 39 


<( 


Perkins, Fred., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 48, 42 


Corporal, . 


Robinson, Fred R., . 


- 


s. s., 


46, 44, 38 


<( 


Wilde, Samuel J., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 44, 42 


Private, 


Antrobus, William, . 


Nav. Brig., A, 


1st Class, 


40,41, - 


Sergeant, . 


Housman, William, 


- 


1st do. 


41,39, - 


Private, 


Kenny, John, . 


8th Mass., M, 


1st do. 


42,43, - 


Corporal, . 


Stevens, Walter C, . 


- 


1st do. 


44,38, - 


Private, 


Tufts, George E., 


- 


1st do. 


41,42, - 


Musician, . 


Waugh, Charles, 


- 


1st do. 


40,41, - 


Private, 


Allen, Donald A., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Musician, . 


Brownlow, George S., 


- 


2d do. 


17, 18 


Private, 


Bickford, Alfred, 


- 


2d do. 


17, 18 


<< 


Bailey, Albert E., . 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 


Sergeant, . 


Caldwell, Jackson, . 


- 


2d do. 


17, 17 


Private, 


Churchill, Percival M., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


<< 


Curtis, Everett N., . 


- 


2d do. 


17,19 


(« 


Davies, Daniel F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,20 


<« 


Flagg, George F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Frampton, William R., . 


- 


2d do. 


18,22 


a 


Fisher, Frank W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 19 


<< 


Garland, Francis B., 


- 


2d do. 


17, 17 


<< 


Ham, Leon W., 


- 


2d do. 


17,18 


<t 


Jennings, Fred T., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,19 


u' 


Kueble*, Charles L., 


- 


2d do. 


20,21 


Sergeant, . 


Martin, Frank E., . 


- 


2d do. 


17,17 


Private, 


Mitchell, Byron R., . 


- 


2d do. 


19,20 


Captain, 


Neal, Frank K., 


- 


2d do. 


17,18 


Private, 


Newton, Leon W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


«< 


Perkins, John K., . 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 


(< 


Perkins, Ralph G., . 


- 


2d do. 


17,20 


<< 


Paull, George B. P., 


- 


2d do. 


17, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Rice, James, . > . 


- 


2d do. 


17,20 


Corporal, . 


Ramsdell, Charles E., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Private, 


Saunders, Leo F., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


u 


Staples, Thomas H., 


- 


2d do. 


18,21 


<< 


Shattuck, William A., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Turner, Thomas 0., 


- 


2d do. 


17, 18 


Private, 


Torrey, William M., 


- 


2d do. 


17,17 


<( 


Tailby, William W., 


- 


2d do. 


17, 18 


(< 


VanderhofF, John H., Jr., 


— 


2d do. 


19,20 



190 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



TROOP A, FIRST BATTALION CAVALRY -Concluded. 



Kank. 



Name. 



Service in U. S. 

Volunteers, 

1898. 

Regt. and Co. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Corporal, 
Private, 



Lieutenant, 
Private, 

Corporal, . 
1st Sergeant, 
Private, 



Wiggin, Walter, 
Austin, George W., . 
De Venne, John E., 
Forde, John H., 
Glynn, John F., 
Hancock, Winfield S., 
Hedtler, Oscar, 
Hoffman Herman, . 
Proctor, George, 
Bunting, James E., . 

Barrows, Harold K., 
Havlin, Fred G., 
Haskell, Warren B., 
Kimball, Edward A., 
Smith, Elmer C, 
Sawin, Benjamin G., 



Georgia Im- 
munes. 



Nav. Brig., A, 



2d Class, 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


S. S 




S. s 




3d Class, 


2d 


do. 


3d 


do. 


2d 


do. 



19,20 

14, 14 

15, 16 
14,16 
15, 15 

15, 15 
14, 14 
14, 15 

16, 16 



Distinguished marksman, . . 1 

Sharpshooters, . . . .11 

First class marksmen, . . 6 

Second class marksmen, . . 34 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



11 
11 



74 



TROOP D, FIRST BATTALION CAVALRY. 



Corporal, . 


Swan, William L., . 


1st Mass., L, 


D. M., 


48, 46, 41 


Trooper, 


Charles, Owen C, . 


- 


S. S., 


45, 45, 41 


Corporal, . 


Googins, Frank J., . 


- 


s. s., 


42, 42, 44 


Sergeant, . 


Locke, Edwin S., . 


- 


s. s., 


44, 43, 40 


Trooper, 


Moulton, Clyde D., . 


- 


s. s., 


45, 44, 44 


1st Sergeant, 


Sinclair, Samuel T., 


- 


s. s., 


44, 43, 38 


Trooper, 


Smith, Lewis G., 


- 


D. M., 


45, 48, 43 


Sergeant, . 


Tandy, Elon F., 


2d U.S. Arty., 
A. 


D. M., 


44, 43, 38 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Wilson, William H., 


s. s., 


46, 47, 45 


Corporal, . 


Akins, John C, 


- 


1st Class, 


41,42, - 


<< 


Kenny, William, 


8th Mass., M, 


1st do. 


40,42, - 


Trooper, 


Libby, Frederick W., 


- 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


Musician, . 


Simmons, William A., 


6th Mass., E, 


1st do. 


40,41, - 


Trooper, 


Bowman, Harry E., 


- 


2d do. 


21,20 


<( 


Carraher, J. Joseph, 


, 


2d do. 


21,20 


Lieutenant, 


Coburn, Eugene A., 


5th Mass., A, 


2d do. 


21,21 


Trooper, 


Connors, Edward J., 


5th Mass., E, 


2d do. 


20,20 


(< 


Cytronberg, Charles J., . 


1st U.S. Cav., 
L. 


2d do. 


19, 19 


Corporal, . 


Gilman, John E., Jr., 


2d do. 


20, 19 


<< 


Lane, Frederick C., . 


- 


2d do. 


17,17 


Trooper, 


Leigh ton, Albert B., 


- 


2d do. 


17,17 


it 


Lewis, Percival C, . 


- 


2d do. 


22,20 


<« 


Marston, G. Lester, . 


- 


2d do. 


19, 18 


a 


O'Brien, John H., . 


5th Mass., E, 


2d do. 


19, 18 


Sergeant, . 


Rogers, William C, 


2d U. S. 
Arty., A. 


2d do. 


19,18 


Musician, . 


Willis, Harry E., . 


6th Mass., M, 


2d do. 


19,18 


Trooper, 


Vibert, George A., . 


- 


2d do. 


20, 17 


«« 


Atkins, Francis J., . 


- 


3d do. 


16,15 


<( 


Boyd, William R., . 


- 


3d do. 


18, 15 


<< 


Burnaby, William E., 


- 


3d do. 


17, 16 


<« 


Cantwell, C. Frank, . 


— 


3d do. 


14, 14 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



191 



TROOP D, FIRST BATTALION CAVALRY -Concluded. 







Service in U. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Trooper, 


Watson, Arthur, 


_ 


3d Class, 


18, 14 


(< 


Baker, Benjamin L., 


- 


2d do. 


- 


<( 


Colclough, John E., . 


- 


3d do. 


- 


«< 


Dana, William J., . 


- 


1st do. 


_ 


«< 


Downes, George M., 


- 


3d do. 


- 


<< 


Fendian, Antaki A., 


- 


3d do. 


_ 


t« 


Harding, Herbert P , 


- 


3d do. 


- 


<< 


Hartung, Emil G., . 


- 


2d do. 


- 


(< 


Harting, Paul G., 


- 


S. S., 


- 


Lieutenant, 


Kelly, William H., . 


- 


1st Class, 


_ 


Trooper, 


Lewis, John E., 


- 


3d do. 


_ 


Corporal, . 


May, Arthur W., 


- 


3d do. 


- 


Trooper, 


McMillan, Archibald, 


- 


D. M., 


_ 


Captain, 


Perrins, John, Jr., . 


- 


S. S., 


- 


Trooper, 


Robinson, Henry, . 


- 


2d Class, 


- 


« 


Reed, Samuel V., 


9th Mass., B, 


3d do. 


_ 


Sergeant, . 


Schmitz, Charles A., 


- 


2d do. 


- 


Trooper, 


Tolman, William S., 


5th Mass., A, 


2d do. 


- 


a 


Woodbury, Harry C, 


- 


3d do. 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Worden, Louis E., . 


~ 


3d do. 


- 


Distinguished 


marksmen, . . 4 


Third class mark; 


smen, 


. 14 


Sharpshooters 


, .... 8 


Unqualified mem 


bers, 


. 20 


First class ma 


rksmen, . . 6 


Total, . 


. . 


. —71 


Second class r 


aarksmen, . . 19 








TROOP F, UNATTACHED CAVALRY. 


Captain, 


Monahan, John J., . 




D.M., 


43, 45, 43 


Lieutenant, 


Keyes, Edward H., . 


- 


D. M., 


47, 47, 43 


Sergeant, . 


McMaster, Harry C., 


- 


D. M., 


42, 43, 41 


Lieutenant, 


Shaw, Elisha H., 


- 


S. S., 


43, 42, 42 


1st Sergeant, 


Bartletl, Charles E., 


- 


S. s., 


43, 44, 45 


Q. M. Sergeant, . 


Scribner, Charles F., 


- 


s. s., 


45, 45, 42 


Sergeant, . 


Fisber, Edward, 


- 


s. s., 


42, 44, 41 


(c 


Wilson, John H , 


- 


s. s., 


42, 42, 41 


Corporal, . 


Quigley, William H., 


- 


s. s., 


47, 44, 43 


Private, 


McMaster, F. E., . 


- 


S. o., 


47, 44, 41 


Sergeant, . 


Dixon, David J., 


- 


1st Class, 


42,41, - 


Corporal, ." 


Ricker, Edward S., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 40, - 


Private, 


Alderton, Robert, . 


- 


1st do. 


44,44, - 


tt 


Bradley, John J., 


- 


1st do. 


45,41, - 


u 


Brown, George W, . 


- 


1st do. 


40, 41, - 


(( 


Duane, Michael, 


- 


1st do. 


42,42, - 


«( 


Farrow, Joseph E., . 


- 


1st do. 


43, 43, - 


<( 


Jones, George F., . 


- 


1st do. 


43, 40, - 


M 


Larkin, Thomas J., . 


- 


1st do. 


42, 40, - 


<( 


McMaster, John F., 


- 


1st do. 


42,45, - 


<< 


Mitchell, Albert C.,,. 


- 


1st do. 


42, 40, - 


(< 


Mooney, James F., . 


- 


1st do. 


41,42, - 


(« 


Morning, John, 


- 


1st do. 


43,41, - 


«< 


Taylor, Charles F., . 


- - 


1st do. 


44,42, - 


Corporal, . 


Haley, Daniel E., 


- 


2d do. 


19, 19 


t< 


Kimball, Myron C, 


- 


2d do. 


20,20 


Bugler, 


McNally, David P., 


- 


2d do. 


17,18 


Private, 


Barrett, William S., . 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


« 


Chase, Lyman W., . 


- 


2d do. 


17,17 


<i 


Crossland, Christopher E., 


- 


2d do. 


18, 18 


(< 


Downs, Fred, . 


— 


2d do. 


18,18 





192 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPORT. [Jan, 



TROOP F, UNATTACHED CAVALRY — Concluded. 



■ 




Service in 17. S. 






Rank. 


Name. 


Volunteers, 
1898. 

Regt. and Co. 


Class. 


Scores. 
1901. 


Private, 


Egan, James, . 




2d Class, 


18,21 




* . . 


Gerow, George W., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 




* . . 


Gray, John J., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


21 




• . . 


Knowton, Horace E., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 




f t # 


Mallalieu, John F., . 


- 


2d do. 


19 


21 




< , . 


Martindale, John J., 


- 


2d do. 


17 


19 




* . . 


Maybury, Eugene H., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 




« . . 


Otterson, Ingreld L., 


- 


2d do. 


20 


21 




1 . . 


Pope, George J., 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 




* , . 


Purcell, Herman L., 


- 


2d do. 


19 


19 




* . . 


Queesey, George N., 


- 


2d do. 


17 


19 




< . , 


Robbins, Waldo S., . 


- 


2d do. 


17 


17 




< . . 


Spaulding, Harry G., 


- 


2d do. 


17 


18 




< . , 


Spicer, Alvin, . 


- 


2d do. 


17 


19 




< . . 


Dutton, Alex., . 


- 


2d do. 


18 


18 


Asst. Surgeon, . 


Scoboria, Arthur G., 


- 


3d do. 


16 


, 16 ' 


Hosp. Steward, . 


Parker, Ralph W., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


,18 


Private, . . • 


Bailey, John G., 


- 


3d do. 


16 


20 




< , . 


Barris, Walter J., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


16 




'• . . 


Brown, George M., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


17 




* . . 


Buttrick, Archie W., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


17 




t * % # 


Dutton, Daniel W., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 




' , . 


Flagg, Warren H., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


17 






Hutchinson, John W., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


16 




' m m 


Jones, Alfred F., 


- 


3d do. 


15 


17 




< ■ . 


Karlson, Emile C., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


18 




< m . 


Mason, Joseph E., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


18 




k j . 


Palmer, Lewis B., . 


- 


3d do. 


15 


, 18 




" , . 


Parker, George H., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


16 




'< . . 


Smith, Pearley D., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


17 




" . . 


Ward, Harry E., . 


- 


3d do. 


16 


17 




" . . 


Boies, Ernest H., 


- 


3d do. 


- 




'< i 9 


Decatur, Edward E., 


- 


2d do. 


- 




ii 9 


Farran, Samuel T., . 


- 


3d do. 


- 




K # 


Fletcher, William, . 


- 


2d do. 


- 




" . . 


Riney, Joseph B., . 


- 


2d do. 


- 




" . . 


Wright, Sidney W., 


- 


3d do. 


- 




f m m 


Fulton, Charles S., . 


- 


S. S., 


- 




(< ^ m 


House, Arthur W., . 


- 


- 


- 




ii # # 


Johnson, William H., 


- 


S.S., 


_ 




( f # . 


McLeod, Doual J., . 


- 


S. s., 


_ 


Bugler, 


Carll, Williston, 


- 


D. M., 


- 


Corporal, . 


Marshall, J. E., 


- 


s. s., 


- 


<< t . 


Karlson, Hjalraer 0., 


- 


s. s., 


- 


k m 


O'Brien, John W., . 


- 


s. s., 


- 


Sergeant, . 


Wilkins, J. H., 


1 


1st Class, 


— 



Distinguished marksmen, . . 4 

Sharpshooters, . . . .13 

First class marksmen, . . 15 

Second class marksmen, . . 26 



Third class marksmen, 
Unqualified members, 
Total, . 



19 

4 
— 81 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



193 



REVOLVER QUALIFICATIONS. 



Bank. 



Name. 



Organization. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Col. James G. White, 

" James A. Frye, 
Maj. Charles P. Nutter, 
Lt. John B. Paine, . 

" John M. Portal, . 
Sgt. Maj. Wm. D. Huddleson 
Q. M. Sgt. S. G. Smith, . 
P. M. " George R. Russell 
Col. Sgt. Horace N. Conn, 
" " Axel T. Tornrose, 
Capt. E. Dwight Fullerton, 
Lt. James H. Smyth, 
Capt. Walter E. Lombard, 
Lt. Frederick Spenceley, . 
Capt. Joseph L. Gibbs, . 
" Walter L Pratt, . 
Lt. Ralph E. Mathewson, 
Maj. Frederick E. Pierce, 
Lt.-Col. Edwin R. Shumway 
Capt. Edwin G. Barrett, . 
Lt. Herbert A. Warren, . 
Capt. Edwin R Gray, 
Lt. Fred S. Weymouth, . 

" William Butement, . 
Capt. William C. Hayes, 
Lt. Fred B. Jordan, . 
Capt. Harry C. Young, . 
Lt. Chester W. French, . 

" David A. Turner, 
Capt. James A. Campbell, 
Lt. Sydney H. Cliffe, 

" William O'Brien, 
Maj. Wiilard C. Butler, . 
Lt. Fred C. Chamberlain, 

" Charles R. Gow, 
Capt. Henry L. Kincaide, 
Lt. Charles W. Facey, 
Capt. C. E. Hamilton, 
Lt. J. F. Williams, . 
Capt. Thomas McCarthy, 
Lt George S. Cutler, 
Capt. Francis Meredith, Jr., 
Lt. Charles H. Groves, . 
Chaplain J. De Wolf Perry, 
Lt. Col. George H. Priest, 
Maj. Warren E. Sweetser, 
Lt. Franklin G. Taylor, . 
Capt. Frank E. Gray, 
Lt. John H. McMahon, . 

" Elmer E. Morrison, . 
Capt. James C. Smith, 

" Colby T. Kittridge, 
Lt. John H Kelsey, 

" William L. Conrad, . 
Capt. Frank E. Cutter, . 
Lt. Elden L. Holt, . 
Capt. William Fairweather, 
Lt. George S. Howard, 
Capt. George R. Barnstead, 
Lt. William D. Desmond, 
Capt. John F. Barrett, 
Lt. Stanley Donahoe, 

" George W. Langdon, . 
Capt. Charles H. Cutler, . 



Staff, Commander-in-Chief 

First Heavy Artillery, 
(< (< <« 

Staff, First Heavy Artillery, 

(< K a ft 

N. C. S., First Heavy Artillery, 



Hd'qrs, " " 

<< <( « 

Battery A, First Heavy Artillery, 

A, " 

B, " " 
D, " " 

Staff, Second Infantry, 



Co. A, " " 

C, " 

E, " " 

E, " " 

G, " " 

G, " " 

H, " " 

H, " " 

j <( <t 

K, " " 

M, " " 

M, " " 

M, " « 

Fifth Infantry, . 

Staff, Fifth Infantry, 



Co. B, " " 

F, " " 

G,' " » 

G, " " 
H, " « 
M, " " 

Staff, Sixth Infantry, 



Staff, " " 

Co. A, Sixth Infantry, 

A, " " 

A, " " 

B, " " 

C, " " 

C, " " 

D, " " 

F, " " 
j? << «« 

g! " « 

G, « " 

H, " « 

H, " 

M, " " 

M, " " 
Staff, Eighth Infantry, 

Co. C, " " 



1st Class, 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

l6t do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 



28,28 
29,29 
28,28 
28,29 

28, 28 
30, 30 

29, 29 
30,30 
28,28 
28,30 
30,30 
28, 28 
28,28 
28,28 
29,29 
28,28 
28, 28 
28,28 
28,28 
28,28 
28, 28 
28,28 
28,29 
28,28 
28,28 
28,28 
28,30 
28,28 
29,28 
28,29 
28, 28 
28,28 
28,28 
29,28 
30,30 
28,28 
28,28 
28,28 
28, 28 
28,29 
28, 29 
28,29 
28,29 
28,28 
30,30 
28,29 
28, 28 
28,29 
28, 29 
28,29 
29,29 
28,28 
28,30 
28, 28 
28,28 
28,28 
28,28 
28, 28 
29,30 
28,30 
28,28 
28,28 
28, 28 
28,28 



194 ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



REVOLVER QUALIFICATIONS - Continued. 



Bank. 



Name. 



Organization. 



Class. 



Lt. Francis J. Lounsbury, 
Capt. Charles T. Hilliker, 
" George N. Jewett, . 
Lt. Ernest C. White, 
Capt. P. Frank Packard, 
Lt. F. Ernest Clark, 

" William C. Jones, 
Col. William H. Donovan, 
Lt. Col. Lawrence J. Logan, 
Capt. George M. Rogers, . 
Lt. Timothy J Sullivan, 

" Edward J. Logan, 
Capt. Thomas F. Quinlan, 
" Patrick A. Sands, . 
Lt. Frank L. Donovan, . 
Capt. Jeremiah J. Moynihan, 
Lt. Matthew E. Hines, . 

" John F. Hurley, . 
Capt. Peter J. Cannon, . 
" John F. Kenealy, . 
Lt. James H. McGee, 

" Charles Schneider, 
Q.M.Sgt. Benjamin L. Knapp 
Sgt. Maj. Henry V. Thayer, 
Lt. John A. Blanchard, . 

" Charles H. Cole, Jr., . 

'« Frank F. Phinney, 
Capt. Virgil C. Pond, 
Lt. Jesse F. Stevens, 

" Charles E. Loud, 
Lt.-Col. Walter F. Peck, . 
Lt. Robert Robertson, 

" H. A. Titus, 

" George E. Symonds, . 

" Frank S. Perkins, 
G. M. George P. Cooley, . 
Ensign Alva G. Corrao, . 
Lt. Edmund E. Baudoin, 
C. B. M. E. B. Bates, 

B. M. George T. Adams, . 
Ensign Walter S. Barr, . 

C. B. M. William H. Owens, 
Q. M. Edwin S. Smith, . 
Bayman Ernest A. Witt, . 
B. M. Alfred J. Wright, . 
Lt. Winthrop Alexander, 
Sgt. Christopher Harrison, 
Lt Alfred Mudge, . 

Maj. William A. Perrins, 
Sgt. Albert J. Walton, . 
Corporal Charles B. Appleton, 
1st Sgt. Fred G. Havlin, . 
Lt. Frank T. Hitchcock, . 
Corporal Samuel J. Wilde, 
" John C. Akins, . 
Sgt. Edwin S. Locke, 
Trooper Clyde D. Moulton, 
Corporal William L. Swan, 
Sgt. Elon F. Tandy, 
Q. M. Sgt William H. Wilson 
Capt. John J. Monahan, . 
Lt. Edward H. Keyes, 
" Elisha H. Shaw, 
Corporal William H. Quigley, 



Co. C, Eighth Infantry, 
D, " " 

H, " " 

H, " " 

T «( it 

■»-» 

T (< (( 

x » 

U tl 

Ninth Infantry, . 
<< it 

Co. A, Ninth Infantry, 
A, " " 

A, " " 
C, " 

F, " " 
j? «« <« 

G,' " " 

G, " 

G, " " 

K, " " 

L, " " 

L, " " 

L, " " 

N. C. S., First Corps Cadets, 
« << a 

Co. A, " " 

B, " " 

B, " " 

C, " " 

C, " " 

D, " " 

Second Corps Cadets, . 

Staff, Second Corps Cadets, 
t« a u a 

Co. A, " " " 

Q (( il it 

Co. D, Naval Brigade, 

E, " " 
G, " " 
G, " " 

F, " " 
F, " " 
F, " " 
F, " " 
F, " " 
Y " *' 

Staff, First Batt. Cavalry, 
N. C. S., First Batt. Cavalry, 
Staff, 

N. C. S., 
Troop A, 

A, 

A, 

A, 

D, 

D, 

D, 

D, 

D, 

D, 

F, Unattached 

F, 

F, " 

F, 



1st Class, 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 7. 



195 



REVOLVER QUALIFICATIONS — Continued. 



Kane. 



Same. 



Organization. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Lt. William Amory, 2d, . 
Sgt. Arthur Blake," . 
Corporal R. Sever Hale, . 

" Howard L. Rogers, 
Private Howard M. Adams, 
" Roy B Baker, . 
'« Edgar W. Leonard, 
" Wm. E Putnam, Jr. 
" Gardnier Rogers, 
" Charles Walcott, . 
Sgt. Walter J. Cookson, . 
Private William S. Earle, 
Corporal Charles E. French, 
Private Henry A. Leslie, Jr., 
Sgt. John J. McCarty, 

" Delevan R. Nichols, . 
Private Clarence A. Tavlor, 
" Alfred L. Twombly, 
Lt. Moses H. Tisdell, 
Capt. Stephen N. Bond, 

" J. Hallv Craig, 
Lt. Herbert G Whitten, 
Capt. Daniel J. Murphy, 
Sgt. George Burroughs, 
Capt. W. 0. Webber, 
Maj.. Herbert A. Clark, 
Capt. Hugh Bancroft, 
Prov. Segt. Morton E. Cobb, 
Hosp. Stw'd Albert L. Wyman, 
Lt.-Col. Charles B. Woodman, 
Maj. Perlie A. Dver, 

" George F. Quimby, 
Lt. J. Stearns Cushing, . 

" Willard M. Foster, . 

" James E. Totten, 
Ch Bug. Wm. H. Hooper, Jr 
Sgt. Maj. Walter E. Oakes, 
" George E. Potter, 
Orderly Arthur E. Schulze, 
Lt. Marshall Underwood, 

" Arthur E. Hall, . 

" Norman P. Cormack, 

" J. C. De Wolf, . 

" William Renfrew, 

" Bertie E. Grant, 
Capt. George E Horton, 
" Frederic S. Howes, 
Lt. Clifford L. Harris, 

" Alton L. French, 
Capt. David Fuller, . 
Lt. Fred W. Harrison, 

" William J. Meek, 
Ch. Bug. Henry F. Ladbury, 
Capt. William E Parsons, 
Lt. Thomas B. Shaw, 

" Frederick H. Liicke, . 

11 John J. O'Connell, . 

" Everett W. Wilcox, . 

" Frederick M Clark, Jr., 
Capt. Phineas L. Rider, . 
Lt. Edward J. Leyden, . 

" Clarence E. Smith, 
Capt. James R. Gilfillan, . 
Lt. Albert G. Beckman, . 



Battery A, Light Artillery, 
A, " - 

A, " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

B, First Light Artillery, 
B, " " " 

B, " " " 

B, " " " 

B, " M M 

B, " " " 

B, " " " 

B, " " " 

Co. A, Second Infantry, 

Staff, Eighth Infantry, 



" Ninth " 

N. C. S., First Brigade, . 

Staff, " " 

" Second " 

«< «« <i 

N. C. S., Second Brigade, . 

(I «« a 

First Heavy Artillery, 
<« <( << 

<< << «< 

Staff, First Heavy Artillery, 

« (< (< M 

it (( CI (( 

N. C. S., First Heavy Artillery, 



Battery B, " " 

C, " M 

D, " " 

E, " " 
H, " " 

H, " " 

T << (( 

K, " " 

L, « 

L, " " 

M, " " 

M, " " 

M, •■ " 
N. C. S., Second Infantry, 

Staff, " " 

<< (< si 

Co. A, " " 

B, " " 

B, " " 

C, " « 

C, " " 
G, u " 
H, " " 

I, " " 

J, " « 



1st Class, 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

1st do. 

2d do. 



2d 
2d 



2d 
2d 



2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
i 2d 
! 2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 



2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 
2d 



do. 
do. 



2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 



do. 
do. 



2d do. 
2d do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



2d do. 
2d do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



! 30, 30 

29, 29 

30, 30 
29, 29 

28, 29 
i 30, 30 

28,30 

29, 29 
1 29, 30 
] 30, 30 

28,28 
28, 28 
28, 28 

28, 28 

29. 29 
29,30 
28, 29 
28, 28 



I X- 



2" 
■27 
25 
26 
25 
25 
25 
25 
26 
25 
26 
25 
26 
26 
25 
26 
27 
26 
25 
27 
2? 
25 
2: 
25 
25 
26 
2! 
2: 
25 
25 
26 
26 
.26 
27 
25 

2-: 

25 
25 

25 
2r 
2! 



, 26 
,27 
,26 
. 26 
,26 
,26 
,26 
,26 
,26 
,25 
,26 
,26 
,27 
,27 
,25 
,27 
,27 
, 26 
,26 
,27 
,26 
,25 
,26 
,25 
, 26 
,26 
, 26 
,27 
,25 
,25 
,27 
, 26 
,26 
,26 
,27 
,25 
,25 
,25 
,26 
,25 
,26 






196 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S EEPORT. [Jan. 



REVOLVER QUALIFICATIONS — Continued. 
















Scores. 


Rank. Name. 




Organization. 


Class. 


1901. 


Lt. Winfred A. Sabin, 


Co. K, Second Infantry, . 


2d Class, 


26, 26 


Chaplain Charles E Beals, 


Staff, Fifth Infantry, . 


2d 


do. 


28,27 


Surgeon Charles W. Gallonpe, 


a 


< a 


2d 


do. 


26,25 


CoL Sgt. Adolphus G. Gustaf- 




t a 


2d 


do. 


28,26 


son. 
P.M. Sgt. William W. Wade, . 


N. C. S 


, Fifth Infantry, . 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


Lt. Rupert D. Worcester, 


Staff, 


(i «< 


2d 


do. 


27, 26 


Col. Sgt. Walter W. Cooke, . 




<< (< 


2d 


do. 


27,25 


Lt. Rowland W. Bray, . 


Co. A, 


tt tt 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


" Patrick J. McNamara, 


B, 


tt a 


2d 


do. 


28,25 


Capt. Ernest R. Springer, 


c, 


tt it 


2d 


do. 


25, 25 


Lt. Thomas E. Wye, 


c, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


27,26 


" Charles E. Nauman, . 


D, 


tt a 


2d 


do. 


25,27 


" Henry L. Sampson, . 


D, 


a <( 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


" Francis H. Marion, . 


G, 


a tt 


2d 


do. 


25, 26 


" George T. Latimer, . 


H, 


« tt 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


Capt. W. H. Goff, Jr., . 


I, 


(( a 


2d 


do. 


25,26 


" Everard Whittemore, 


M, 


tt tt 


2d 


do. 


26,26 


Sgt. Ma] John E. Bruch, 


N. C. S. 


, Sixth Infantry, . 


2d 


do. 


26,26 


Maj. Cyrus H. Cook, 




«< <« 


2d 


do. 


25, 25 


Capt. Clarence W. Coolidge, . 


Staff, 


«< tt 


2d 


do. 


26,27 


Sgt. Maj. John W. Cull, . 


N. C. S 


<« << 
> • • 


2d 


do. 


25, 28 


Col. Charles K. Darling, . 




<( a 


2d 


do. 


25, 26 


Lt. William N. Decker, . 


Staff, 


(( a 


2d 


do. 


27, 29 


Sgt. Maj. Edgar Dewey, . 


N. C. S 


tt tt 
> • 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


Chf. Bugler Philip M.Emmott, 


<< 


it it 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


Col. Sgt. George Faber, . 


<< 


a a 


2d 


do. 


26,29 


Lt. Joseph S. Hart, . 


Staff, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


27,27 


" Lewis G. Hunton, 


(< 


a a 


2d 


do. 


26,27 


Maj. Isaac N. Marshall, . 




a a 


2d 


do. 


25, 26 


Com. Sgt. Frederic C. M. Silk, 


N. C. S. 


a a 
> • * 


2d 


do. 


26,27 


Lt. Frank V. Gilson, 


Co. B, 


a it 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


" Sumner B. Lawrence, 


B, 


a it 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


" Gardner W. Pearson, . 


c, 


tt a 


2d 


do. 


26,26 


Capt. Andrew J. Whelan, 


r>, 


a tt 


2d 


do. 


26,25 


Lt. William H. Dolan, . 


D, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


25, 25 


Capt. Herbert W. Damon, 


E, 


tt a 


2d 


do. 


26,26 


Lt. George W. Sullivan, . 


E, 


a tt 


2d 


do. 


25,25 


" Frederic M . Kendall, . 


E, 


it it 


2d 


do. 


26, 25 


" Ernest A. Howe, 


F, 


tt tt 


2d 


do. 


26,26 


" Pearl T. Durrell, 


G, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


26,27 


" Duncan M. Stewart, . 


H, 


<< a 


2d 


do. 


26,25 


" John W. Hagerty, 


I, 


a tt 


2d 


do. 


27,27 


Capt. Francis T. Jackson, 


I, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


25, 27 


Lt. Walter Sohier, . 


I, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


25, 25 


" G. W. Braxton, . 


L, 


tt tt 


2d 


do. 


27,26 


" W. B. Gould, Jr., 


L, 


a tt 


2d 


do. 


26,25 


" Charles H. Kimball, . 


M, 


tt n 


2d 


do. 


26,27 


Chaplain Milo H. Gates, . 


Staff, Eighth Infantry, 


2d 


do. 


27,27 


Maj. Thomas L. Jenkins, 


(( 


a a 


2d 


do. 


25,26 


Lt. Edward Miller, . 


Co. A, 


tt a 


2d 


do. 


25,26 


" Ralph L. Shepard, 


A, 


a tt 


2d 


do. 


26, 27 


Capt. E. Leroy Sweetser, 


B, 


tt a 


2d 


do. 


25, 26 


Lt. Charles H. Hillman, . 


B, 


a tt 


2d 


do. 


25,26 


" Thomas J. Cobey, 


D, 


(( << 


2d 


do. 


25, 25 


" Willjam W. Cann, . 


D, 


it tt 


2d 


do. 


25,26 


" Charles B. Burnham, 


E, 


t( (< 


2d 


do. 


27, 26 


Capt. David E. Jewell, . 


F, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


25,26 


Lt. Frank W. Robinson, . 


H, 


tt a 


2d 


do. 


25, 26 


" James E. Connors, . 


L, 


it a 


2d 


do. 


26,27 


Capt. James E. McGourty, 


Staff, Ninth Infantry, 


2d 


do. 


26,25 


Lt. J. J. Hickey, 


Co. B, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


26, 26 


" Maurice E. Bowlen, . 


c, 


a a 


2d 


do. 


26, 28 


" Michael L. King, 


c, 


a n 


2d 


do. 


26,27 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



197 



REVOLVER QUALIFICATIONS — Continued. 



Bank. 



Name. 



Organization. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Capt. John J. Barry, 
Lt. Daniel P. Sullivan, 

»* Cornelius J. Murphy, 
Capt. James A. Cully, 
Lt. John F. Delaney, 

" John F. Mclnnes, 

" Martin J. Healey, 

" John J Boyle, . 
Maj. Charles M. Green, 
Lt. William A. Hayes, 2d 

" Alfred J. Rowan, 

" William B. Stearns, 
Capt. Franklin L. Joy, 
Lt. John Lavalle, 
Capt. Francis E. Cabot, 
Lt. Frank A. Stearns, 
Capt. Charles H Rollins, 
Lt. William S. Simmons, 
Maj. Andrew Fitz, . 
Lt. B. F. Sturgis, . 

" J. G. Burbeck, . 

" E. T. Graham, . 

" Harry R. Peach, 
Capt. John E Spencer, 
Lt. J. M. Clark, 

" H. S. Perkins, . 

" John Bion Richards, 
Ch. Q. M. Raymond D. Borden 

B. M. George C. Fisher, . 
Ensign Bradford H. Pierce, 
Lt. Louis E. Felton, 

" Charles H Parker, . 

C. B. M. Arthur F. Cary, 
Lt. Fred. H. Turnbull, . 
Ensign M. I. Deane, 
Q. M. H W. Jeff, . 
G. M. J. T. Nelson, . 
Coxswain F C. Ardrey, . 

" J. G McDonald, 

Q. M. Chas. R. Sohlgren, 
Lt. A. Ernest Thomas, 
B. M. J. F Walton, 
Q. M. Richards Evans, 
B. M. James E. Harrington, 
G. M. Thomas O'Brien, 
Lt. William M. Olding, 
Sgt. Alfred M. Blinn, 
Lt. John W. Hall, . 
" John C. Kerrison, 
Sgt. Lester S. Norcross, 
Private Donald A. Allen, 

" Albert E Bailey, 
Sgt. John S. Barrows, 
Private Francis B. Garland, 

" Winfield S. Hancock, 
Sgt. William Housman, . 
Private George L. Marshall, 

" George R. Mc Master, 

" Byron R. Mitchell, 
Capt. Frank K. Neal, 
Private Fred Perkins, 
Corporal Charles E. Ramsdell 
Sgt. James Rice, 
Private Thomas H. Staples, 



Co. E, Ninth Infantry, 
E, " " 

E, " " 

T (( <« 

■*■» 

T «< << 

K, " " 

K, " « 

Staff, First Corps Cadets, 



Co. A, " " 

A, " " 

B, " " 

C, " " 

D, " " 
D, " " 

Second Corps Cadets 
Staff, Second Corps Cadets, 

Co. B, " " 

B, " " 

C, « " 

C, " " 

D, " " 

D, " " 
Staff, Naval Brigade, 
Hd'qrs, " " 
Co. A, " " 

A, " " 

C, " " 

C, " " 

E, " " 

E, " " 

F, " " 
p «< *< 

F,' " " 

G, " « 
G, " " 
G, " « 
G, " " 
G, " " 

T ii <( 
■*•» 

T «< u 

x > 

T «« <( 

x » 

it (« 

N. C.S., First Batt. Cavalry, 

Staff, " " 

N. C. S., " « 

Troop A, " " 

A, « « 

A, " " 

A, " '« 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " « 

A, " " 

A, " «' 

A, « «« 

A, " " 

A, " " 



2d Class, 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 

2d do. 



25,25 
26,27 
25, 25 
25, 26 
25, 26 
27,25 
25,26 
25,26 
25, 27 
25, 28 
26,27 
25, 25 
25,26 
25,25 
25,26 
25, 26 
27,28 
26,27 
25, 25 
26,28 
25, 26 
26,25 
25, 25 
25, 26 
26,26 
27,26 
25, 25 

25, 25 

26, 28 
25,26 
27,27 
25, 25 
25,25 
25, 26 
25, 25 
26,25 
25,25 

25, 26 

26, 27 
25, 25 
26,26 

25, 26 
26,26 
26,26 
26,26 

27, 26 
25,25 
28,26 
28,26 

26, 25 
25,26 
25, 25 
26,27 
25, 25 
25,25 
26,27 
26,26 
25, 26 
25, 25 
26,26 
25,25 
25, 26 
26,26 
25, 25 



198 ADJUTANT GEISTEKAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 



REVOLVER QUALIFICATIONS - Concluded. 



RANK. 



Name. 



Organization. 



Class. 



Scores. 
1901. 



Sgt. Thomas 0. Turner, . 
Musician Charles Waugh, 
Trooper Owen C. Charles, 
Corporal Frank J. G-oogins, 
Trooper Frederick M. Libby, 
1st Sgt. Samuel T. Sinclair, 
Musician Harry E. Willis, 
Sgt. David J. Dixon, 
Lt. Harry S. Blake, . 
Sgt. Thomas E. Ripley, . 
" Lincoln Davis, . 
Private Adelbert Ames, Jr., 
" Harold W. Baker, 
" John C. Cobb, Jr., 
" Julian S. Chamberlain 
" Norman Fish, 
" Bertram Lord, 
" Frank B. Lawler, 
" Charles C. Payson, 
" S. Rominy Spring, 
" Robert Wainwright, 
" Harold Wesson, . 
" William A. Army, 
" Joseph W. Barker, 
" Edward F. Brady, 
Sgt. Fred J. Carlson, 
Private Herbert I. Childs, 
" Herbert D. Coombs, 
" John J. Farsett, . 
" William H. Fletcher, 
" Harvey H. Gleason, 
Corporal Fred E. Kibbe, . 
Private Joseph A. La Prade, 
" Stephen B. Randall, 
Lt. William E. Sayles, . 
Private Nicholas J. Smith, 
" James F. Sullivan, 
1st Sgt. Fred S. Taylor, . 
Private Nils Westerlund, 
Sgt. Maj. George H. Russell, 
Lt. William J. McCullough, 



Troop A, First Batt. Cavalry, 

A, 

D, 

D, " 

D, 

D, « 

D, 

F, Unattached, 
Battery A, Light Artillery, 
A, " " 

A, " " 

All K 

t 

Ait a 

j 

A(( it 

» 

A, " " . 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " 

A, " " . 

A a (« 

An tt 

Act <( 

» 

B, First Light Artillerv, 
B, " " " 

B, " " " 

> • 

g «< << «« 

b', " " " 

B, " " " 

g <( it n 

B, ■■ " " 

B, " " " 

Bn i< n 

g (« n n 

b| " " " 

B, " " " 

B, " " " 

B, " " " 

g << (< « 

N. C. S., First Heavy Artillery, 
Battery C, " " <s 



2d Class, 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


27, 


2d 


do. 


28, 


2d 


do. 


27, 


2d 


do. 


27, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


27, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


27, 


2d 


do. 


27, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


Sd 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


27, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


26, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 


25, 


2d 


do. 




2d 


do. 





25 
25 
27 
27 
26 
26 
25 
26 
26 
27 
27 
26 
25 
28 
27 
27 
28 
28 
26 
26 
26 
27 
25 
25 
25 
26 
27 
25 
25 
25 
26 
26 
28 
25 
28 
27 
26 
25 
25 



DISTINGUISHED MARKSMEN IN SERVICE NOV. 16, 1901. 









Date of 


Rank. 


Name. 


Organization. 


Admission to 
Class. 


Private, . 


Abbott, William T., . 


Co. I, Eighth Infantry, 


1896 


B. M., . 


Adams, George T., 


H, Naval Brigade, . 


1896 


Private, . 


Allen, Frederick W., . 


B, First Corps Cadets, . 


1899 


<( 


Anderton, Thomas, 


Batterv B, First HeavvArt'y, 


1897 


Sergeant, 


Baker, Fred I., 


Co. E, Second Infantry, 


1900 


Captain, . 


Barrett, John F., . 


M, Sixth " 


1896 


Lieutenant, 


Baudoin, Edmund E., . 


G, Naval Brigade, . 


1893 


Lieut. -Col., 


Benyon, George H., 


Staff, Commander-in-Chief, . 


1890 


Q.M. Sergeant, 


Berg, C. David, . 


Co. L, Fifth Infantry, . 


1899 


Private, . 


Blake, John W., . 


Battery B, First Heavy Art'y, 


1892 


Bugler, . 


Bourgeois, Samuel, 


Co. A, Sixth Infantry, . 


1900 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— STo. 7. 



199 



DISTINGUISHED MARKSMEN" - Continued. 









Date of 


Bank. 


Name. 


Organization. 


Admission to 
Class. 


Captain, . 


Breen, John, . 


Staff, Ninth Infantry, . 


1895 


Sergeant, 


Barrows, John S., 


Troop A, First Batt. Cavalry, 


1900 


Private, . 


Cadigan, James C, 


Co. M, Second Infantry, 


1891 


(< 


Campbell, William M., 


D, Eighth " 


1901 


Bugler, . 


Carll, Williston, . 


Troop F, Unatt. Cavalry, 


1900 


C. B.M., 


Cary, Arthur F., . 


Co. E, Naval Brigade, . 


1901 


Private, . 


Chesley, George W., . 


A, Sixth Infantry, 


1899 


Lieutenant, 


Clark, "F. Ernest, . 


I, Eighth " ' . 


1900 


«« 


Cobey, Thomas J., 


D. " " 


1900 


Color Sergeant, 


Conn, Horace N., . 


First Heavy Artillery, . 


1891 


G. M., . 


Cooley, George P., 


Co. B, Naval Brigade, . 


1895 


Color Sergeant, 


Cooke, Walter W., 


Fifth Infantry, 


1896 


Private, . 


Coombs, Chester A., . 


Co. A, Sixth Infantry, . 


1901 


Corporal, 


Cowling, Edward J., . 


Battery A, First Heavy Art'y, 


1899 


Q. M. Sergeant, 


Daniels, Fred. R., 


Co. B, Second Infantry, 


1901 


Private, . 


Durward, George, 


G, Fifth 


1896 


<< 


Durward, James, . 


G, " " 


1900 


Corporal, 


Durward, William A , . 


G, " " 


1900 


Private, . 


Ellis, Harrv C, . 


Battery E, First Heavy Art'y, 


1901 


<( 


Erickson, E. C. B., 


«< j> << << c« 


1895 


Color Sergeant, 


Faber, George, 


Sixth Infantry, 


1896 


Lieutenant, 


Facey, Charles W., 


Co. B, Fifth Infantry, . 


1893 


« 


Felton, Louis E., . 


C, Naval Brigade, . 


1897 


«< 


Foster, Willard M., 


Staff, First Heavy Artillery, 


1890 


Colonel, . ' . 


Frye, James A., . 


First Heavy Artillery, . 


1892 


Sergeant, 


Gambell, Philip D., 


Co. G, Fifth Infantry, . 


1897 


Captain, . 


Gibbs, Joseph L., . 


Battery E, First Heavy Art'y, 


1891 


Lieut-Col., 


Gihon, Edward J., 


Staff, Commander-in-Chief, . 


1890 


Captain, . 


Gray, Frank E., . 


Co. A, Sixth Infantry, . 


1893 


Lieutenant, 


Groves, Charles H.. 


M, Fifth " . 


1900 


Captain, . 


Hamilton, Clifford E , . 


F, " " 


1896 


(< 


Hilliker, Charles T., . 


D, Eighth " 


1890 


Sergeant, 


Hinckley, Freeman, 


C, First Corps Cadets, . 


1901 


Private, . 


Hinds, Chester A., 


E, Second Infantry, 


1893 


Sergt. Major, . 


Huddleson, William D., 


N. C. S., First Heavy Art'y, 


1890 


Private, . 


Jackson, W. B., . 


Co. F, Fifth Infantry, . 


1895 


1st Sergeant, . 


Jeffers, Charles J., 


D, Eighth " 


1897 


Private, . 


Jefferson, A. D., 


C, Second « 


1892 


(« 


Jefts, George M., . 


A, Sixth " 


1901 


<< 


Johnson, Ernest V., 


B, Second " 


1901 


Q. M. Sergt., ! 


Keough, James H., 


A, Sixth " 


1890 


Lieutenant, 


Keyes, Edward H., 


Troop F, Unattached Cavalry, 


1890 


1st Sergeant, . 


Litchfield, Allen J., 


Battery B, First Heavy Art'y, 


1900 


1st " " . 


Lutes, Welsford J., 


Co. L, Fifth Infantry, . 


1899 


Captain, . 


McCarthy, Thomas, 


G, " " . 


1896 


Lieutenant, 


McMahon, John H , 


A, Sixth " 


1900 


Trooper, . 


McMillan, Archibald, . 


Troop D, First Batt. Cavalrv, 


1899 


Sergeant, 


McMasters, Harry C, . 


F, Unattached " 


1898 


Captain, . 


Monahan, John J., 


F, " " 


1898 


Lieutenant, 


Morrison, Elmer E., . 


Co. A, Sixth Infantry, . 


1901 


Private, . 


Murphy, William R., . 


A, " " 


1901 


Sergeant, 


McTaggart, David D., . 


A, Second " 


1901 


Major, 


Nutter, Charles P., 


First Heavy Artillery, . 


1894 


Corpora], 


Osborne, John" F., 


Co. C, First Corps Cadets, . 


1899 


Lieutenant, 


Paine, John B., 


Staff, First Heavy Artillery, 


1894 


Private, . 


Parker, Maurice W., . 


Co. D, First Corps Cadets, . 


1899 


a 


Patten, Lewis W., 


G, Fifth Infantry, . 


1897 


Lieutenant, 


Perkins, Frank S., 


C, Second Corps Cadets, 


1899 


Captain, . 


Pond, Virgil C, . 


C, First " « 


1895 


1st Sergeant, . 


Porter, Herbert S., 


L, Second Infantry, 


1900 


Sergeant, 


Pratt, Henry B., . 


F, Fifth « 


1901 


Private, . 


Reid, George W., . 


A, Sixth " 


1896 


Lieutenant, 


Richards, John B., 


Staff, Naval Brigade, . 


1896 


Bugler, . 


Ripley, Winfield S., Jr., 


Battery K, First Heavy Art'y, 


1895 



200 



ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPORT. [Jan. 



DISTINGUISHED MARKSMEN — Concluded. 









Date of 


Rank. 


Name. 


Organization. 


Admission to 
Class. 


P.M. Sergeant, 


Russell, George R., 


N. C. S., First Heavy Art'y, 


1890 


Orderly, . 


Schulze, Arthur R., 


a (< a a 


1897 


Private, . 


Sedgley, Alton R., 


Co. A, Sixth Infantry, . 


1897 


<< 


Sisson, A. H., 


J, Eighth " 


1890 


1st Sergeant, . 


Smith, Herbert L., 


K, Sixth " 


1899 


Trooper, . 


Smith, Lewis G., . 


Troop D, First Batt. Cavalry, 


1901 


Q. M. Sergt., . 


Smith, Samuel G., 


N. C. S., First Heavy Art'y, 


1895 


Sergeant, 


Soule, Ernest L., . 


Battery E, " " " 


1899 


Major, 


Southmayd, Fred'k G., 


Second Infantrv, . 


1890 


Corporal, 


Swan, William L., 


Troop D, First Batt. Cavalry, 


1899 


n 


Sweeney, Thomas J., . 


Co. G. Fifth Infantry, . 


1900 


Major, 


Sweetser, Warren E., . 


Sixth Infantry, 


1893 


Lieutenant, 


Symonds, George E , . 


Co. A, Second Corps Cadets, 


1891 


Sergeant, 


Tandy, Elon F., . 


Troop D, First Batt. Cavalry, 


1901 


Private, . 


Tolman, James H., 


Co. I, Sixth Infantry, . 


1899 


Col. Sergeant, . 


Torn rose, Axel T., 


N. C. S., First Heavy Art'y, 


1895 


Corporal, 


Thresher, Edwin A., . 


Battery B, " " " 


1901 


Lieutenant, 


Underwood, Marshall, . 


B, " " " 


1900 


Sergeant, 


Upton, Joshua D., 


Co. D, First Corps Cadets, . 


1895 


1st Sergeant, . 


Wakefield, Frank A., . 


B, Second Infantry, 


1901 


Lieutenant, 


Williams, J. F., . 


F, Fifth 


1901 


Sergeant, 


Wise, Stuart W., . 


C, First Corps Cadets, . 


1899 


B. M., . 


Wright, Alfred T., 


H, Naval Brigade, 


1900 



Efficients in Service Nov. 16, 1901. 

COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF AND STAFF. 









go 


a 




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W 


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A 


02 


E 


QD 


H 


9 




19 


15 


4 


2 


5 


4 


2 


2 


3 



Colonel James G. White, Inspector General of Rifle Practice. Efficient strength, 
79 per cent. 



FIELD AND STAFF, FIRST BRIGADE. 



18 


16 


2 


- 


2 


2 


8 


4 



Major C. D. Wainwright, A. I. G. R. P. Efficient strength, 88.88 per cent. 



FIELD AND STAFF, SECOND BRIGADE. 



18 


16 


2 


- 


3 


2 


7 


4 



10 



Major Herbert A. Clark, A. I. G. R. P. Efficient strength, 88. 88 per cent. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



201 



FIRST REGIMENT HEAVY ARTILLERY. 









«; 


a 




a 


d 


a 




















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£■23 

08 OS 


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5S 


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83 


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a 


beg 

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CO 

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o 
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w 


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02 


s 


cc 


H 


0? 


Field and Staff, . 


30 


30 


— 


10 


6 


3 


11 


_. 


28 


Battery A, . 








62 


58 


4 


1 


6 


4 


18 


29 


58 


Battery B, 










58 


58 


- 


6 


13 


10 


25 


4 


58 


Battery C, 










63 


47 


16 


- 


9 


5 


18 


15 


44 


Battery D, 










61 


55 


6 


- 


7 


7 


19 


22 


53 


Battery E, 










62 


62 


- 


3 


16 


4 


30 


9 


62 


Battery F, 










62 


61 


1 


- 


6 


8 


24 


23 


60 


Battery G, 










61 


61 


- 


- 


2 


10 


22 


27 


61 


Battery H, 










63 


63 


- 


- 


10 


5 


25 


23 


63 


Battery I, 










63 


62 


1 


- 


6 


15 


32 


9 


60 


Battery K, 










60 


53 


7 


1 


9 


11 


22 


10 


44 


Battery L, 










62 


61 


1 


- 


1 


- 


40 


20 


60 


Battery M, 










63 


63 


- 


- 


20 


12 


26 


5 


63 


Totals, 










770 


734 


36 


21 


111 


94 


312 


196 


714 



Lieut. John M. Portal, I. R. P. Efficient strength, 95.32 per cent. 





SECOND REGIMENT 


INFANTRY. 








Field and Staff, . 


29 


26 


3 


1 


12 


7 


5 


1 


11 


Company A, . 






61 


61 


- 


1 


15 


6 


29 


10 


58 


Company B, . 






53 


50 


3 


3 


12 


3 


15 


17 


49 


Company C, . 






63 


63 


- 


1 


25 


13 


24 


- 


63 


Company D, . 






58 


57 


1 


- 


18 


5 


33 


1 


56 


Company E, . 






58 


54 


. 4 


2 


9 


4 


31 


8 


50 


Company F, . 






63 


29 


34 


- 


- 


1 


14 


14 


29 


Company G, . 






63 


63 


- 


- 


7 


13 


32 


11 


63 


Company H, . 






61 


61 


- 


- 


9 


5 


32 


15 


61 


Company I, . 






55 


52 


3 


- 


20 


5 


16 


11 


47 


Company K, . 






51 


51 


- 


- 


6 


8 


20 


17 


50 


Company L, . 






59 


45 


14 


1 


3 


5 


22 


14 


35 


Company M, . 






63 


61 


2 


1 


24 
160 


15 


21 


- 


61 


Totals, . 




- 


737 


673 


64 


10 


90 


294 


119 


633 



Lieut. Ralph E. Mathewson, I. R. P. Efficient strength, 91.31 per cent. 





FIFTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 








Field and Staff, . 


30 


27 


3 


1 


6 


1 


13 


6 


21 


Company A, . 






63 


56 


7 


- 


1 


3 


22 


30 


53 


Company B, . 






63 


52 


11 


1 


5 


6 


18 


22 


46 


Company C, , 






57 


48 


9 


- 


2 


6 


32 


8 


42 


Company D, . 






63 


34 


29 


- 


1 


1 


22 


10 


33 


Company E, . 






54 


54 


- 


- 


7 


6 


29 


12 


53 


Company F, . 






63 


63 


- 


4 


18 


8 


25 


8 


63 


Company G, . 






58 


58 


- 


7 


6 


6 


31 


8 


55 


Company H, . 






59 


42 


17 


- 


2 


6 


20 


14 


33 


Company I, . 






63 


48 


15 


- 


- 


3 


26 


19 


39 


Company K, . 






61 


38 


23 


- 


1 


2 


29 


6 


34 


Company L, . 






58 


53 


5 


2 


8 


4 


33 


6 


46 


Company M, . 






60 


54 


6 


1 


4 


7 


27 


15 


47 


Totals, . 




• 


752 


627 


125 


16 


61 


59 


327 


164 


565 



Lieut. Charles R. Gow, I. R. P., Efficient strength, 83.37 per cent. 



202 



ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 









£C 


e 




e 


• 


c 












o 






CD 


CD 










.Q 


*sa 


*4 


S 




B 


to 




+z 




T3 






CO 

2^ 


GO CO 

03 ^ 


°°5 


© 




c 

CD 


to 


Sg 


._ U 


o 


2 »* 

03 e3 


Oo3 


S3 


03 . 




a 

'o 


a 
°S 
6 


03 

3 

c 


boa 

.5 

09 


OQ 

a. 

>- 

eS 


aa 


s 


•0 

IS 


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m 


W 


t> 


Q 


C/2 


fc 


oc 


H 


c 


Field and Staff, . 


29 


28 


1 


2 


7 


6 


12 


1 


20 


Company A, . 






62 


62 


- 


11 


19 


7 


25 


- 


62 


Company B, . 






63 


63 


- 


- 


16 


15 


29 


3 


63 


Company C, . 






63 


63 


- 


- 


19 


9 


25 


10 


61 


Company D, . 






60 


60 


- 


- 


7 


4 


31 


18 


60 


Company E, . 






63 


63 


- 


- 


12 


9 


29 


13 


63 


Company F, . 






57 


57 


- 


- 


13 


4 


29 


11 


57 


Company G, . 






58 


58 


- 


- 


8 


9 


29 


12 


49 


Company H, . 






55 


55 


- 


- 


9 


11 


30 


5 


53 


Company I, . 






57 


56 


1 


1 


11 


7 


27 


10 


54 


Company K, . . 






58 


39 


19 


1 


- 


3 


14 


21 


34 


Company L, . 






58 


58 


- 


- 


4 


8 


29 


17 


53 


Company M,. 






60 


60 


21 


1 


4 


5 


25 


25 


58 


Totals, .... 


743 


722 


16 


129 


97 


334 


146 


687 


Lieut. Joseph S. Hart, I. R. P. Efficient strength, 97.17 per cent. 


EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 


Field and Staff, . 


30 


21 


9 




10 


4 


7 


_ 


1 


Company A, . 






52 


35 


17 


- 


11 


1 


9 


14 


32 


Company B, . 






63 


63 


- 


- 


3 


11 


29 


20 


63 


Company C, . 






63 


63 


- 


- 


4 


3 


33 


23 


63 


Company D, . 






59 


52 


7 


4 


6 


10 


16 


16 


48 


Company E, . 






52 


39 


13 


- 


1 


4 


22 


12 


31 


Company F, . 






43 


40 


3 


- 


7 


7 


15 


11 


35 


Company G, . 






63 


61 


2 


- 


13 


2 


38 


8 


54 


Company H, . 






61 


59 


2 


- 


7 


12 


22 


18 


56 


Company I, . 






63 


63 


- 


3 


14 


9 


31 


6 


63 


Company K, . 
























Company L, . 






53 


30 


23 


- 


3 


2 


11 


14 


23 


Company M,. 






51 


33 


18 


- 


- 


1 


20 


12 


27 


Totals, .... 


653 


559 


94 


7 


79 


66 


253 


154 


496 


Lieut. George W. Langdon, I. R. 


P. Efficient strength, 85.60 ] 


3er cen 


t. 




NINTH REC 


JIMENT INFANTRY. 








Field and Staff, . 


28 


21 


7 


1 


5 


3 


9 


3 


15 


Company A, . 






57 


49 


8 


- 


7 


3 


22 


17 


32 


Company B, . 






59 


53 


6 


- 


3 


5 


19 


26 


50 


Company C, . 






63 


44 


19 


- 


2 


3 


15 


24 


44 


Company D, . 
























Company E, . 






62 


59 


3 


- 


3 


5 


17 


34 


58 


Company F, . 






63 


50 


13 


- 


4 


2 


15 


29 


50 


Company G, . 






56 


53 


3 


- 


9 


8 


22 


14 


50 


Company H, . 






54 


44 


10 


- 


- 


8 


16 


20 


43 


Company I, . 






62 


58 


4 


- 


3 


11 


14 


30 


56 


Company K, . 






63 


59 


4 


- 


2 


7 


27 


23 


59 


Company L, . 






60 


57 


3 


- 


8 


5 


23 


21 


56 


Company M,. 






61 


51 


10 


- 


10 


8 


10 


23 


41 


Totals, . 


• 


• 


688 


598 


90 


1 


56 


68 


209 


264 


554 



Lieut. John T. Golden, I. R. P. Efficient strength, 86.92 per cent. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— ISTo. 7. 



203 



FIRST CORPS CADETS. 









DQ 


c 




_j 


B 


a 












<D 






0> 


a> 










JO 


"2H 


t-i 


a 


t» a 


3 






+z 




■g a 


■3.3 




go 

W4d 




S3 


o 




53 

a 

"3 

u 


CD 

s 
.2 
o 


s 


.2 *- 

S o3 

beg 

.a 


o 

3 
.a 


CO 5-t 

as 


OS 

c 
o 
o 


c3 £ 


OS • 
OP* 

5© 




W 


s 


5 


P 


w 


fe 


m 


* 


<y 


Field and Staff, . 


10 


10 


_ 




5 


2 


3 




7 


Company A, . 


57 


57 


- 


- 


11 


8 


32 


6 


51 


Company B, . 


37 


37 


- 


1 


17 


6 


11 


2 


32 


Company C, . 


63 


63 


- 


4 


23 


13 


22 


1 


61 


Company D, . 


47 


47 


- 


2 


17 


13 
42 


14 


1 


46 


Totals, .... 


214 


214 


- 


7 


73 


82 


10 


197 



Lieut. William A. Hayes, I. R. P. Efficient strength, 100 per cent. 



SECOND 


CORPS CADETS. 










Field and Staff, . 


12 


12 


_ 


mm 


3 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Company A, . 


38 


31 


7 


1 


2 


8 


17 


3 


23 


Company B, . 


38 


30 


8 


- 


3 


6 


15 


6 


19 


Company C, . 


43 


42 


1 


1 


5 


6 


27 


3 


38 


Company D, . 


43 


42 


1 

17 


- 


8 


6 
28 


23 


5 


37 


Totals, .... 


174 


157 


2 


21 


85 


21 


123 



Lieut. Robert Robertson, I. R. P. Efficient strength. 90.22 per cent. 



NAVAL BRIGADE. 



Field and Staff, . 


19 


19 


. 


1 


5 


1 


10 


2 


16 


Headquarter Division, 




32 


29 


3 


- 


1 


5 


15 


8 


27 


Company A, . 




59 


47 


12 


- 


3 


4 


13 


27 


43 


Company B, . 






54 


49 


5 


1 


6 


4 


18 


20 


44 


Company C, . 






45 


44 


1 


i 
i 


2 


1 


14 


26 


43 


Company D, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Company E, . 






58 


58 


- 


1 


6 


8 


35 


8 


56 


Company F, . 






59 


59 


- 


- 


12 


14 


30 


3 


55 


Company G, . 






57 


54 


3 


1 


12 


9 


21 


11 


53 


Company H, 






59 


57 


2 


2 


15 


7 


27 


6 


55 


Company I, . 






59 


57 


2 

28 


- 


3 


10 


35 


9 


55 


Totals, . 




• 


501 


473 


7 


65 


63 


218 


120 


447 



Lieut. G. I. Jones, O. O. Efficient strength, 94.41 per cent. 



FIRST BATTALION CAVALRY. 



Field and Staff, 


10 


10 






5 




4 


1 


4 


Troop A, 


74 


63 


11 


1 


11 


6 


34 


11 


56 


Troop D, . . 


71 


51 


20 


4 


8 


6 


19 


14 


32 


Totals 


155 


124 


31 


5 


24 


12 


57 


26 


92 



Lieut. Alfred Mudge, I. R. P. Efficient strength, 80 per cent. 



204 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



TROOP F, UNATTACHED CAVALRY. 









!» 


^ 




c 


s 


s 












a> 




o> 


CD 


CD 










J2 


■ss 


S~ 


a 


s S 


a 


so 




+1 




■ga 




o 
o 

a 


to 


« CO 


89 <" 
COM 


O 




a 

CS 


« 


33 


■ - - 






3£ 


aS . 




a 






5§ 


c 1 ^ 


U S 


So 




s 




S 


« 


s- 

03 
,43 


CO 

(-1 


o 




3* 




w 


W 


P 


fl 


OQ 


fe 


0Q 


H 


G? 




81 


77 


4 


4 


12 


16 


26 


19 


62 



Efficient strength, 95.06 per cent. 



EFFICIENTS, FIRST 


BRIGADE. 








Field and Staff, . 

First Heavy Artillery, . 

Second Infantry, . 

Sixth Infantry, 

Troop F, Unatt. Cavalry, . 


18 
770 
737 
743 

81 


16 
734 
673 
722 

77 


2 
36 
64 
21 

4 


21 
10 
16 

4 


2 

111 

160 

129 

12 


2 
94 
90 
97 
16 


8 

312 

294 

334 

26 


4 

196 

119 

146 

19 


9 

714 

633 

687 

62 


Totals, .... 


2,349 


2,222 


127 


51 


414 


299 


974 


484 


2,105 



Efficient strength, 94.59 per cent. 





EFFICIENTS 


SECOND 


BRIGADE. 








Field and Staff, 




18 


16 


2 


. 


3 


2 


7 


4 


10 


Fifth Infantry, 


... 


752 


627 


125 


16 


61 


59 


327 


164 


565 


Eighth Infantry, 


... 


653 


559 


94 


7 


79 


66 


253 


154 


496 


Ninth Infantry, 


• . . 


688 


598 


90 


1 


56 


68 


209 


264 


554 


First Battalion C 


avalry, 


155 
2,266 


124 


31 


5 


24 
223 


12 


57 


26 


92 


Totals, . 


1,924 


342 


29 


207 


853 


612 


1,717 



Efficient strength, 84.90 per cent. 



CONSOLIDATED REPORT OF EFFICIENTS. 



Commander-in-Chief and 
Staff. 

Field and Staff, First Brigade, 

Field and Staff, Second Bri- 
gade. 

First Heavy Artillery, 

Second Infantry, 

Fifth Infantry, 

Sixth Infantry, 

Eighth Infantry, 

Ninth Infantry, 

First Corps Cadets, 

Second Corps Cadets, 

Naval Brigade, 

First Battalion Cavalry, 

Troop F, Unatt. Cavalry, 

Totals, . 



19 

18 
18 

770 
737 
752 
743 
653 
688 
214 
174 
501 
155 
81 



5,523 



15 

16 
16 

734 
673 
627 
722 
559 
598 
214 
157 
473 
124 
77 



5,005 



2 
2 

36 
64 
125 
21 
94 
90 

17 

28 

31 

4 

518 



21 

10 
16 
16 
7 
1 
7 
2 
7 
5 
4 



98 



2 
3 

111 

160 
61 

129 
79 
56 
73 
21 
65 
24 
12 

801 



4 


2 


2 


2 


8 


4 


2 


7 


4 


94 


312 


196 


90 


294 


119 


59 


327 


164 


97 


334 


146 


66 


253 


154 


68 


209 


264 


42 


82 


10 


28 


85 


21 


63 


218 


120 


12 


57 


26 


16 


26 


19 


643 


2,214 


1,249 



4,592 



Efficient strength, 90.62 per cent. 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7, 



205 



REVOLVER QUALIFICATIONS, 1901. 







03 

to 


33 

60 


> 

33 


h 




►» 


>> 


>> 


CO 

a. 
hi 
o 


ft 

Sh 

o 


CD 

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o 

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S3 

o 






o7 


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l-CG 


29 
"3 fe 




B 
T3 


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e 


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23 




Field and Staff, . 


1 


2 


4 


19 


6 


10 


17 


3 


3 


6 


5 


2 


9 






Company A, . 




- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1 


3 


2 


3 


3 


1 


2 


20 


- 


24 


Company B, . 




- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


1 


3 


2 


2 


- 


- 


25 


Company C, . 




- 


- 


' - 


1 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


3 


3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


Company D, . 




- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


3 


3 


- 


3 


2 


- 


11 


- 


- 


Company E, . 




- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


3 


1 


3 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


Company F, . 














2 


3 


1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


- 


5 


- 


Company G-, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


7 


- 


- 


- 


Company H, . 




- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


- 


- 


Company I, . 




- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


1 


3 


3 


3 


- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


Company K, . 




- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Company L, . 




- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 














Company M, . 




- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


2 


3 


















Totals, . 


1 


2 


4 


38 


29 


27 


49 


21 


27 


18 


13 


31 


40 


5 


49 



REGIMENTAL COMPETITIONS. 

Company Teams of Ten, Ten Shots at 200 Yards. Highest 

Possible Score, 1,125. 

First Regiment Heavy Artillery, Walnut Hill, October 22. The Regimental 
Trophy was won by Battery B. 

Battery B, Cambridge, . . .935 

Battery E, New Bedford, . . 912 

Battery F, Taunton, . . .846 

Battery D, Boston, . . .783 

Battery C, Boston, . . .760 

Battery M, Fall River, . . .759 

Battery K, Boston, . . . 751 



Battery I, Brockton, 
Battery A, Boston, 
Battery H, Chelsea, 
Battery L, Boston, 
Battery G, Boston, 
Headquarters, Boston, 



714 
706 
686 
635 
616 
947 



Second Infantry, Holyoke, October 17. The Regimental Trophy was won by 
Company B. 

Company B, Springfield, 
Company M, Adams, . 
Company E, Orange, 
Company A, Worcester, 
Company D, Holyoke, . 
Company I, Northampton, 



. 889 


Company G, Springfield, 


. 839 


. 871 


Company H, Worcester, 


. 829 


. 857 


Company C, Worcester, 


. 822 


. 856 


Company K, Springfield, 


. 784 


. 854 


Company L, Greenfield, 


. 754 


. 852 


Company F, Pittsfield, . 


. 680 



Fifth Infantry, Lexington, October 10. 
Company G. 

Company G, Woburn, . . . 969 

Company F, Waltham, . . 888 

Company L, Maiden, . . . 884 

Company M, Hudson, . . . 769 

Company E, Medford, . . .722 

Company C, Newton, . . . 661 



The Regimental Trophy was won by 



Company K, Braintree, 
Company I, Attleborough, 
Company H, Charlestown, 
Company A, Charlestown, 
Company B, Cambridge, 
Company D, Plymouth, 



655 
640 
579 
576 
564 
534 



206 



ADJUTANT GEISTEKAL'S KEPORT. [Jan. 



Sixth Infantry, Lexington, October 14. 
Company A. 

Company A, Wakefield, . . 974 

Company C, Lowell, . . . 945 

Company I, Concord, . . . 862 

Company D, Fitchburg, . . 835 

Company B, Fitchburg, . . 835 

Company H, Stoneham, . . 833 



The Regimental Trophy was won by 



Company E, So. Framingham, 
Company G, Lowell, 
Company F, Marlborough, 
Company L, Boston, 
Company M, Milford, . 
Company K, Southbridge, 



823 
753 
699 
695 
691 
628 



Eighth Infantry, Lynn, October 24. The Regimental Trophy was won by Com- 
pany I. 

Company I, Lynn, 
Company D, Lynn, 
Company B, Everett, . 
Company G, Gloucester, 
Company H, Salem, 
Company F, Haverhill, 



. 919 


Company C, No. Cambridge, 


. 657 


. 877 


Company E, Beverly, . 


585 


. 834 


Company A, Newburyport, . 


. 573 


. 758 


Company M, Somerville, 


549 


. . 705 


Company L, Lawrence, 


. 469 


. 681 







Ninth Infantry, Walnut Hill, November 1. The Regimental Trophy was won by 
Company A. 

Company A,»Boston, 
Company L, Natick, 
Company G, Worcester, 
Company M, Lowell, 
Company E, Boston, 



. 847 


Company F, Lawrence, 


. 640 


. 787 


Company B, Boston, ■ . 


. 479 


. 765 


Company I, Boston, 


. 452 


. 695 


Company C, Boston, 


. 420 


. 653 


Company H, Boston, . 


. 337* 



First Corps Cadets, Lexington, October 19. The Corps Trophy was won by Com- 
pany C. 

Company C, Boston, . . . 852 [ Company D, Boston, . - . . 827 
Company B, Boston, . . . 832 I Company A, Boston, . . . 799 



Second Corps Cadets, Marblehead, September 20. The Corps Trophy was won 
by Company D. 



Company D, Salem, 
Company A, Salem, 



795 
759 



Company C, Salem, 
Company B, Salem, 



727 
720 



Naval Brigade, Walnut Hill, October 29. The Brigade Trophy was won by Com- 
pany H. 

Company H, Springfield, 
Company F, Fall River, 
Company B, Boston, 
Company E, Lynn, 
Company G, New Bedford, 



. 870 


Company I, Fall River, 


. 717 


. 818 


Company C, Boston, 


. 580 


. 799 


Company A, Boston, . 


. 561 


. 741 


Headquarters, Boston, . 


. 728 


. 737 







CAVALRY COMPETITION. 

Teams of Ten, Ten Shots at 200 and Ten at 500 Yards. 
Possible Score, 1,000 Points. 



Walnut Hill, October 3. Trophy won by Troop D. 



Troop D, 
Troop A, 



742 
685 



Troop F, 



666 



* 13 men. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 207 



STATE GENERAL COMPETITIONS. 

I. The State General Rifle Competition, for teams of fifteen, 
ten shots each at 200 and 500 yards, was held at Walnut Hill, 
September 26, and was won by the team of the Sixth Infantry. 
Possible score, 1,500 points. 

Sixth Regiment Infantry. 

Maj. Warren E. Sweetser, . 200 yards, 4554455444 44 

500 " 4 5 5 5 4 5 5 4 4 5 46 

— 90 
Capt. George R. Barnstead, .200 " 5 4 4 5 4 4 4 5 4 5 44 

500 " 3 3 5 5 5 4 3 4 5 37 

— 81 
1st Sergt. Herbert L. Smith, .200 " 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 41 

500 " 4 4 4 3 5 5 5 5 35 

— 76 
Priv. George Faber, . . .200 " 4 5 5 5 4 5 4 4 5 4 45 

500 " 4 5 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 2 41 

— 86 
Q. M. Sgt. James H. Keough, 200 " 4 4 5 4 5 5 5 4 4 5 45 

500 « 4 4 4 5 4 3 3 5 5 5 42 

— 87 
Priv. Robert E. Gibson, . .200 " 4 4 4 5 4 5 4 4 5 4 43 

3355433444 38 

Lieut. John J. McMahon, ^9 " 4445454544 43 

3544434434 38 

Priv. James H. Tolman, . .200 " 5 4 4 3 4 3 3 5 4 4 39 

355544453 5 43 



200 


<< 


600 


(i 


200 


u 


500 


a 


200 


t< 


500 


« 


200 


(< 


500 


a 


200 


« 


500 


<( 


200 


a 


500 


x 


200 


(< 


500 


<( 


200 


it 


500 


<< 


200 


(I 


500 


(« 


200 


(< 


500 


u 



81 



81 



— 82 
1st Sergt. Joseph G. Holmes, .200 " 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 41 

4544533344 39 

— 80 
Lieut. Elmer E. Morrison, .200 " 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 3 44 

4545545455 46 

— 90 
Priv. George W. Reid, . .200 " 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 5 45 

5454325455 42 

— 87 
Priv. William R. Murphy, .200 " 5454444543 42 

5554345555 46 

— 88 
Priv. George M. Jefts, . .200 " 444545455444 

4445445435 42 

— 86 
Priv. Chester A. Coombs, . !00 " 4555554444 45 

3544455444 42 

— 87 
Priv. George W. Chesley, .200 " 5 4 4 4 5 3 5 4 4 4 42 



445544545444 



' 86 
1,268 



208 



ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 



First Regiment Heavy Artillery. 
Sgt. Maj. Wm. D. Huddleson, 200 yards, 4 4 4 4 4 4 



Priv. Thomas Anderton, . 



Q. M. Sgt. Samuel G. Smith, . 200 

500 

P. M. Sgt. George R. Russell, 200 

500 



Maj. Charles P. Nutter, . 
Capt. Joseph L. Gibbs, . 
Sergt. C. Warren Leach, . 
Corp. Edwin A. Thresher, 



Bugler Winfield S. Ripley, Jr., 200 

500 



Priv. John W. Blake, 
Serg. George W. Cole, 
Serg. Ernest L. Soule, 
Priv. Harry C. Ellis, 
Orderly Arthur R. Schulze, 



500 " 4 5 4 3 5 5 

200 " 5 5 5 5 5 4 

500 " 5 4 5 4 5 4 

5 4 4 4 4 4 

4 3 5 5 5 4 

5 4 5 4 4 5 

3 5 4 4 4 4 

200 " 5 4 4 5 3 4 

500 " 4 4 3 2 4 4 

200 " 4 4 4 4 4 5 

500 " 4 4 4 4 4 5 

200 » 3 4 5 5 4 4 

500 " 3 4 4 3 4 5 

200 " 4 5 4 5 4 4 

500 " 3 5 4 4 5 5 

4 4 5 5 4 5 
3 5 4 3 4 3 

200 " 4 4 4 5 4 4 

500 " 4 4 5 5 4 4 

200 '< 5 4 3 4 3 4 

500 " 4 4 4 4 5 5 

200 " 5 5 4 3 4 4 

500 " 4 5 5 4 4 4 

200 " 4 4 5 5 4 5 

500 " 5 4 3 4 4 4 

200 « 4 4 5 4 4 4 

500 " 3 5 3 5 4 



Col. Sgt. Arthur T. Tornrose, .200 " 4 4 4 5 4 4 

500 " 5 4 4 4 5 4 



5 4 4 

4 4 5 

5 5 4 

5 5 4 

5 5 4 

5 5 4 

4 4 4 

4 3 3 

4 3 4 

5 3 4 

3 4 5 

3 4 5 

5 4 5 

5 4 4 

4 5 5 

5 5 4 

4 4 4 

5 5 3 

5 4 4 

5 3 4 

3 4 4 
5 4 4 

5 5 5 

4 5 4 

5 4 4 
5 4 5 

5 4 5 

5 4 4 

4 4 3 

5 4 5 



4 41 

4 43 

5 48 
4 45 



4 43 
3 43 



4 43 

5 39 



4 40 
4 37 



4 41 

3 40 

5 44 

4 40 



5 45 

5 45 

3 42 

3 38 



4 42 

5 43 



5 39 
4 43 



4 44 

2 41 

4 44 

4 42 



5 44 
5 38 



5 41 
5 45 



84 



— 93 



— 86 



— 82 



— 77 



81 



— 84 



90 



— 80 



— 85 



— 82 



85 



— 86 



— 82 



— 86 



Fifth Regiment Infantry. 



Capt. Thomas McCarthy, 



Corp. T. J. Sweeney, 



200 yards, 455445445 
500 " 2 4 3 4 4 4 5 5 4 

200 " 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 
500 « 5 4 4 4 5 3 4 5 5 



1,263 

5 45 

4 39 

— 84 

5 42 
5 44 

— 86 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 209 



Fifth Regiment Infantry — Concluded. 

Sergt. P. D. Gambell, . . 200 yards, 4444544555 44 

500 " 4 4 4 5 5 3 3 4 5 4 41 

— 85 
Corp. Wm. A. Durward, . .200 " 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 48 

500 " 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 4 4 40 

— 88 
Lieut. George S. Cutler, . .200 " 5 4 5 4 4 5 5 3 5 4 44 

500 " 3 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 41 

— 85 
Sergt. C. D. Berg, . . .200 " 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 41 

500 " 3 3 5 3 4 4 5 4 4 5 40 

— 81 
Sergt. H. B. Pratt, . . .200 " 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 4 4 5 44 

500 " 4 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 47 

— 91 
Corp. J. C. Spraker, . .200 " 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 5 44 

500 " 3 4 5 3 4 4 3 4 5 3 38 

— 82 
Lieut. J. F. Williams, . .200 " 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 5 5 45 

500 " 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 3 43 

— 88 
Col. Sergt. W. W. Cook, . .200 « 5 5 4 4 5 4 5 5 4 5 46 

500 " 354442545. 5 41 

— 87 
Capt. C. E. Hamilton, . .200 « 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 4 5 5 45 

500 " 2 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 5 4 43 

— 88 
Priv. W. B. Jackson, . .200 " 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 5 4 4 44 

500 " 3 3 2 2 4 4 5 3 26 

— 70 
Priv. James Durward, . .200 " 4434445445 41 

500 " 5 4 5 4 3 5 5 2 5 5 43 

— 84 
Corp. F. C. Kean, . . . 200 " 5 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 44 

500 " 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 4 40 

— 84 
Priv. George Durward, . .200 " 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 5 4 4 43 

500 " 5 3 4 3 4 5 3 3 3 33 

— 76 



1,259 

Naval Brigade. 
Lieut. Edmond E. Baudoin, . 200 yards, 4544555555 47 



G. M. George P. Cooley, . 
Ensign Alva G. Corrao, . 
B. M. George T. Adams, . 



500 " 4 


4 


5 


5 


5 


4 


5 


5 


5 


5 


47 


























— 


94 


200 


■ 4 


4 


5 


5 


4 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


44 




500 « 


1 4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


39 


83 


200 


" 3 


4 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


5 


5 


44 




500 


' 5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


39 


83 


200 


" 4 


4 


4 


2 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


3 


36 




500 


1 3 


4 


4 


4 


5 


3 


5 


5 


4 


5 


42 


78 



210 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



Naval Brigade — Concluded. 

Q. M. Edward S. Smith, . . 200 yards, 4454553554 44 

500 " 3 5 4 3 3 5 4 4 4 4 39 

Seaman Henry W. Wood, .200 " 4 4 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 4 40 

500 " 4 4 5 4 3 5 4 3 5 37 



83 



— 77 
Lieut. Fred. H. Turnbull, .200 " 4 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 40 

500 " 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 4 4 43 

— 83 
Lieut. A. Ernest Thomas, .200 " 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 39 

500 " 4 3 2 2 5 5 5 4 4 5 39 

— 78 

B. M. William P. Merritt, .200 " 2 4 3 5 3 2 5 5 3 4 36 

500 " 4 4 4 4 5 4 3 5 5 4 42 

— 78 
Seaman Herbert S. Bobbins, .200 " 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 5 4 39 

500 " 3 2 3 3 5 3 4 4 4 3 34 

— 73 

C. B. M. Arthur F. Cary, .200 « 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 3 41 

500 " 4 5 4 4 4 5 4 5 4 5 44 

— 85 
Eosign Miner W. Wilcox, .200 " 4 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 3 43 

500 " 5 5 4 5 5 5 3 2 2 2 38 

— 81 
Seaman Curtis H. Jennings, .200 " 4444445544 42 

500 » 3 4 4 3 4 3 5 3 3 3 35 

C. B. M. William H. Owens, .200 " 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 5 4 44 

500 " 3 5 4 5 3 4 5 2 5 5 41 

B. M. Alfred T. Wright, . .200 " 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 42 

500 " 4 2 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 5 42 



77 



85 



— 84 



1,222 

First Corps Cadets. 

Sergt. Stuart W. Wise, . . 200 yards, 4545455434 43 

500 " 4 4 5 3 5 4 5 5 5 5 45 

— 88 
Corp. Porter B. Chase, . .200 « 3 5 3 5 3 4 4 4 4 4 39 

500 " 3 3 4 2 4 3 4 5 4 5 37 

— 76 
Corp. David Hansen, . .200 « 3 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 39 

500 " 2 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 39 

— 78 
Priv. Eugene H. Clapp, . .200 •« 3 3 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 5 41 

500 " 2 4 5 4 2 2 5 4 4 4 36 

— 77 
Sergt. Maj. Harry V. Thayer, 200 " 5444444343 39 

500 " 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 41 

— 80 
Sergt. Freeman Hinckley, .200 " 4444554555 45 

500 " 4 5 5 4 5 5 4 5 4 5 46 

— 91 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 211 



First Corps Cadets — Concluded. 

Capt. Virgil C. Pond, . . 200 yards, 4444554445 43 

500 « 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 38 

— 81 
Corp. Elbridge K. Newhall, .200 " 4442344444 37 

500 " R 5 5 3 4 5 4 4 4 34 

— 71 
1st Sergt. Robert D. Ware, .200 " 4 4 4 3 5 4 4 4 4 5 41 

500 " 3 2 5 3 4 4 3 4 5 5 38 

— 79 
Lieut. John A. Blanchard, .200 " 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 5 4 5 39 

500 " 3 4 3 5 2 4 5 5 4 5 40 

— 79 
Corp. Leon F. Foss, . . .200 " 5 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 45 

500 " 3 3 5 4 4 4 5 4 2 5 39 

— 84 

Priv. C. E. Kimball, . .200 " 4 4 4 5 5 5 3 2 4 3 39 

500 " 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 40 

— 79 
Sergt. Joshua D. Upton, . .200 " 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 4 5 45 

500 « 5 4 4 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 40 

— 85 
Priv. Maurice W. Parker, .200 " 3 5 4 5 5 5 5 4 4 5 45 

500 " 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 4 43 



Corp. John F. Osborn, . .200 " 4 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 5 4 41 

500 " 3 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 5 5 42 



83 



1,219 
Second Regiment Infantry. 

1st Sergt. Frank A. Wakefield, 200 yards, 3344444445 39 

500 " 5 4 5 4 5 4 4 5 5 5 46 

— 85 
5445455444 44 
5455353355 43 

— 87 
4533444554 41 
4543345522 37 

— 78 
5444444544 42 
5455545544 46 

— 88 
Q.M. Sergt. William Hodecker, 200 " 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 5 39 

500 " 2 4 4 3 3 4 5 4 3 32 

— 71 
Sergt. David D. McTaggart, .200 " 3454535454 42 

500 " 4 5 5 5 5 4 3 4 4 4 43 

— 85 
Sergt. Frank L. Hinds, . .200 " 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 3 41 

500 " 3 4 3 5 2 4 2 5 4 4 36 

— 77 
Musician John W. Moran, .200 " 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 41 



Priv. Ernest V. Johnson, 


. 200 




500 


Sergt. Harry C. Wakefield, 


. 200 




500 


Priv. James C. Cadigan, . 


. 200 




500 



500 " 2 2 5 4 3 4 4 5 3 5 37 



78 



212 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



Second Regiment Infantry — Concluded. 

Priv. Frank O'Neil, . . .200 yards, 4534544334 39 

500 " 3 3 2 4 5 3 3 3 5 31 

— 70 
Corp. Fred I. Baker, . .200 « 5 3 5 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 39 

500 " 3 5 5 5 5 5 3 5 4 5 45 

— 84 
Sergt. Augustus Karlson, . 200 ■ " 4 5 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 5 40 

500 " 4 3 3 4 3 5 4 5 5 3 39 

Q. M. Sergt. Fred. R. Daniels, 200 « 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 43 

500 •' 5 3 5 4 3 5 4 4 5 5 43 

Priv. Henry Pannier, . .200 " 544444 ^4 344 40 

500 " 2 5 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 4 44 



79 



86 



— 84 
1st Sergt. Herbert S. Porter, .200 " 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 41 



500 " 5 5 4 3 5 4 4 4 4 4 42 



83 



Ch. Bug. Henry F. Ladbury, .200 " 3 4 4 4 3 5 4 3 4 5 39 

500 " 3 3 2 4 5 4 4 3 4 3 35 



- 74 



1,209 

Eighth Regiment Infantry. 

1st Sergt. Charles J. Jeffers, . 200 yards, 4 454454444 42 

500 " 5 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 47 

— 89 
Priv. William M. Campbell, .200 " 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 39 

500 « 5 3 4 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 46 

— 85 
Capt. P. Frank Packard, . .200 " 3 4 4 5 4 4 5 5 4 4 42 

500 « 5 5 5 5 4 4 5 4 4 41 

— 83 
Priv. Charles A. Dawson, .200 " 3 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 4 3 44 

500 " 2 3 4 3 4 5 5 5 4 3 38 

— 82 
Corp. Howard B. Weston, .200 " 5 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 40 

500 " 2 4 5 3 3 3 4 4 3 31 

— 71 
Corp. Frank S. Godfrey, .200 " 5445434345 41 

500 " 5 5 3 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 40 

1st Sergt. Walter E. Brown, .200 " 3 4 4 5 3 4 4 4 4 5 40 

500 " 4 3 3 5 3 3 5 4 4 5 39 



81 



- 79 
Sergt. Wm. A. Bradford, .200 " 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 39 

500 " 3 4 3 5 5 4 5 5 5 39 

- 78 
Priv. John J. Hamilton, Jr., .200 " 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 4 5 43 

500 " 3 4 3 4 5 4 5 2 3 33 

- 76 
Priv. William Davies, . .200 " 4 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 41 



500 " 4 4 5 5 4 22 



63 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 213 



Eighth Regiment Infantry — Concluded. 

Priv. Peter S. Hanson, . . 200 yards, 4444544554 43 

500 " 3 3 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 3 39 



Priv. William T. Abbott, .200 " 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 5 43 

500 " 3 5 4 4 5 5 5 5 4 40 

Sergt. Benj. A. Percival, . .200 " 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 3 5 4 42 

500 " 4 3 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 3 42 

Capt. Charles T. Hilliker, .200 " 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 41 

500 " 4 5 5 5 3 4 5 4 5 4 44 

Lieut. Thomas J. Cobey, . .200 " 3 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 41 

500 " 4 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 4 4 35 



82 



83 



84 



85 



76 



Col. Sergt. Charles Frost, 


. 200 




500 


Col. William H. Donovan, 


. 200 




500 


Priv. H. A. McKenzie, . 


. 200 




500 


Lieut. J. S. Gillow, . 


. 200 




500 


Sergt. J. C. Laing, . 


. 200 




500 


Priv. E. W. Snow, . 


. 200 




500 


Musician C. S. Televich, . 


. 200 




500 


Lieut. D. P. Sullivan, 


. 200 




500 


Priv. J. R. Cuddy, . 


. 200 




500 


Lieut. J. H. McGee, . 


. 200 




500 


Corp. F. T. Pond, . 


. 200 




500 


Lieut. Charles Schneider, 


. 200 




500 



1,197 
Ninth Regiment Infantry, 

200 yards, 355 5 455445 45 
3455544554 44 

— 89 
4433434444 37 
3454553345 41 

— 78 
4534444434 39 
3035453545 37 

— 76 
4444345434 39 
R434344555 37 

— 76 
3204443444 32 
4233033353 29 

— 61 
2243333443 31 
04R3335354 30 

— 61 
4343354433 36 
2343434324 32 

— 68 
3442333445 35 
0023402030 14 

— 49 
5444335444 40 
2222434535 32 

— 72 
3444 544355 41 
3544454334 39 



4444334545 40 

4402353334 31 

3454434545 41 

0444444445 37 



80 



71 



78 



214 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

Ninth Regiment Infantry — Concluded. 



Sergt. D. E. Casgrain, 


. 200 yards. 


,2 


3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


5 


4 


3 


35 






500 


«< 


4 





5 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


5 


4 


39 


74 


Capt. J. F. Kenealy, 


. 200 


<< 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


38 






500 


<< 





3 


2 


4 


3 


5 


4 


4 


3 


5 


33 


71 


Sergt. J. D. Steel, . 


. 200 


M 


3 


3 


5 


5 


4 


3 


5 


4 


4 


5 


41 






500 
Second 


" 2 4 4 5 
Corps Cadets. 


5 


2 


4 


4 


4 


5 


39 


80 




1,084 


Capt. Charles F. Ropes, . 


. 200 yards. 


, 4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


3 


5 


5 


2 


40 






500 


i« 


2 


4 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 





3 


3 


31 


71 


Private Reginald C. Wade, 


. 200 


<< 


4 


3 








3 


4 


3 


3 


3 





23 






500 


<< 





2 








4 


3 


5 





3 


2 


19 


42 


Lieut. Frank S. Perkins, . 


. 200 




4 


4 


4 


5 


3 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


41 






500 


(< 


3 


2 


4 


3 


2 





4 


4 


3 


4 


29 


70 


Private Oscar C. Martin, . 


. 200 


<< 


4 


4 


5 


3 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


37 






500 


n 





3 


4 


4 











4 





4 


19 


56 


Corp. Fenton C. Fowler, . 


. 200 


(i 


5 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


35 






500 


«« 





2 


5 





2 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4 


33 


68 


Private Frank A. Stanley, 


. 200 


«« 


4 


5 


3 





4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


5 


35 






500 


t( 








2 


4 


4 


3 


2 


4 


4 


3 


26 


61 


Capt. John E. Spencer, . 


. 200 


<< 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


3 


5 


4 


4 


4 


39 






500 


« 


3 


4 





2 


3 


4 


4 


2 


5 


3 


30 


69 


Sergt. Percival Phillips, . 


. 200 


U 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


9 


4 


3 


4 


4 


35 






500 


M 


5 


2 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


36 


71 


Q.M. Sergt. Ernest L.Newhall, 200 


it 


5 


4 


2 





3 


3 


3 


4 


2 


4 


30 






500 


<< 


2 

















2 





5 





9 


39 


Private John G. Barry, . 


. 200 


(( 


3 


5 


4 


4 


3 


5 


4 


4 


3 


4 


39 






500 


«< 





4 


4 





3 





5 


4 


3 





23 


62 


Private C. H. Evans, 


. 200 


(( 


3 





4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 





29 






500 


<« 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


5 


3 


5 


3 


37 


66 


Sergt. Charles H. Symonds, 


, . 200 


(< 


3 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


41 






500 


«« 


3 


4 


2 


4 


5 


2 


4 


2 


3 


3 


32 


73 


Corp. Arthur R. Miles, . 


. 200 


(1 


4 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


2 


2 


4 


4 


34 






500 


<« 


3 


4 


4 


3 


2 


4 


4 








4 


28 


62 


1st Sgt. G. W. Blinn, 


. 200 


<« 


3 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


40 






500 


<< 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


2 


4 


33 


73 


Sergt. Ralph W. Cushraan, 


. 200 


<< 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


39 






500 


«< 


3 


4 


5 


3 


3 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


40 


79 



962 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 215 



State Team. 

The fifteen competitors making the highest aggregate scores, 
and who were awarded cups, were as follows : — 

Lieut. Edmond E. Baudoin, Company G, Naval Brigade, 94 

Priv. Thomas Anderton, Battery B, First Heavy Artillery, . . . . .93 

Sergt. H. B. Pratt, Company F, Fifth Infantry, 91 

Sergt. Freeman Hinckley, Company C, First Corps Cadets, 91 

Maj. Warren E Sweetser, Sixth Infantry, 90 

Lieut. Elmer E. Morrison, Company A, Sixth Infantry, 90 

Corp. Edwin A. Thresher, Battery B, First Heavy Artillery, . . . .90 

Sergt. C. J. Jeffers, Company D, Eighth Infantry, 89 

Color Sergt. Charles Frost, Ninth Infantry, 89 

Priv. James C. Cadigan, Company M, Second Infantry, * 88 

Priv. William R. Murphy, Company A, Sixth Infantry, 88 

Sergt. Stuart W. Wise, Company C, First Corps Cadets, 88 

Lieut. J. F. Williams, Company F, Fifth Infantry, 88 

Priv. Maurice W. Parker, Company D, First Corps Cadets, 88 

Capt. Clifford E. Hamilton, Company F, Fifth Infantry 88 



Individual prizes (medals) were awarded as follows : — 

First Prize, Sergt H. B. Pratt, Company F, Fifth Infantry, 
Second Prize, Priv. Freeman Hinckley, Company C, First Corps Cadets, 
Third Prize, Lieut. Elmer E. Morrison, Company A, Sixth Infantry, . 
Fourth Prize, Corp. Edwin A. Thresher, Battery B, First Heavy Artillery, 
Fifth Prize, Priv. William R. Murphy, Company A, Sixth Infantry, . 
Sixth Prize, Lieut. J. F. Williams, Company F, Sixth Infantry, . 
Seventh Prize, Priv. E. V. Johnson, Company B, Second Infantry, . 
Eighth Prize, Priv. C. A. Coombs, Company A, Sixth Infantry, . 
Ninth Prize, Q. M. Sergt F. R. Daniels, Company B, Second Infantry, 
Tenth Prize, Priv. G. M. Jefts, Company A, Sixth Infantry, 
Eleventh Prize, Priv. Harry C. Ellis, Battery E, First Heavy Artillery, 
Twelfth Prize, 1st Sergt. F. A. Wakefield, Company B, Second Infantry, 
Thirteenth Prize, Priv. W. A. Campbell, Company D, Eighth Infantry, 
Fourteenth Prize, Bos'n*s Mate A. F. Cary, Company E, Naval Brigade, 
Fifteenth Prize, Sergt, D. D. McTaggart, Company A, Second Infantry, 



91 
91 
90 
90 
88 
88 
87 
87 
86 
86 
86 
85 
85 
85 
85 



The Sixth Regiment Infantry, by virtue of its team making the 
highest score, is entitled to carry the tri-color on its colors during 
the year 1902. 

The State General Carbine Competition for teams of ten, firing 
ten shots each at 200 and 500 yards, was held at Walnut Hill, 
October 3, and was won by the team from Troop D, First Bat- 
talion Cavalry. 

Troop Z>, First Battalion Cavalry. 

Corp. William L. Swan, . . 200 yards, 3 5 5 4 4 5 5 4 4 3 42 

500 " 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 5 5 40 

— 82 
Corp. Frank J. Googins, . .200 " 2203445444 32 

500 " 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 2 34 

— 66 



216 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



Troop D, First Battalion Cavalry — Concluded. 

Sergt. Elon F. Tandy, . . 200 yards, 4544454444 42 

500 " 4 3 5 3 4 4 4 4 2 4 37 

— 79 
Private Frederick M. Libby, .200 " 4334434444 37 

500 " 3 4 5 5 5 4 3 5 4 4 42 

— 79 
Q.M. Sergt. William H.Wilson, 200 " 3 4 4 4 4 5 4 5 4 5 42 

500 " 4 4 3 3 5 5 3 4 4 4 39 

— 81 
Corp. William Kenny, . .200 " 4 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 5 39 

500 " 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 4 3 31 

Private Lewis G. Smith, . .200 " 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 35 

500 " 5 3 5 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 43 

Sergt. Edwin S. Locke, . . 200 " 3 3 3 4 4 3 5 5 4 4 38 

500 " 3 4 3 4 5 3 2 4 3 31 

1st Sergt. Samuel T. Sinclair, .200 " 3434445344 38 

500 » 2 3 4 5 5 3 3 3 3 4 35 

— 73 
Private Paul G. Harting, . .200 " 2332443332 29 

500 " 5 5 5 4 3 4 3 2 3 2 36 

— 65 



200 


«< 


5 


4 


500 


<i 


5 


4 


200 


u 


3 


4 


500 


<< 


3 


4 


200 


«< 


3 


5 


500 


a 


4 


5 


200 


<« 


4 


4 


500 


a 


3 


4 


200 


<< 


3 


3 


500 


<< 


2 


3 


200 


<< 


2 


2 


500 


K 


3 





200 


l< 


4 


5 


500 


<« 


3 


3 


200 


II 


3 


3 


500 


«< 


3 


3 


200 


«« 


3 


5 


600 


<« 


3 


4 



Priv. Fred. A. Leavitt, . .200 « 3 3 5 5 4 4 4 5 3 4 40 

43034004 24 

Corp. Fred. R. Robinson, .200 " 3 5 5 3 4 4 4 5 5 4 42 

43000023 19 



70 
78 
69 



742 
Troop A, First Battalion Cavalry. 

1st Sergt. Fred. G. Havlin, . 200 yards, 3444454445 41 

500 " 4 3 3 10 

— 51 
Priv. George L. Marshall, .200 " 5 4 4 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 43 

33254333 35 

— 78 
Sergt. John S. Barrows, . .200 " 3 4 4 5 3 4 4 4 4 3 38 

43454545 41 

Lieut. Frank T. Hitchcock, .200 " 3 5 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 38 

34553434 40 

Corp. Samuel J. Wilde, . .200 « 4 4 5 4 4 4 5 4 5 4 43 

50443435 35 



79 

78 
78 



Corp. Charles B. Appleton, .200 " 3 3 4 2 3 2 4 3 3 5 32 

53354333 34 

— 66 

34434344 33 
32200345 22 

— 55 

iv. Fed. P . . -24445445 41 

434443 ^3 3 34 



75 

64 

61 
685 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 217 



Troop F, Unattached Cavalry. 

Q. M. Sgt. Charles F. Scribner, 200 yards, 3333244425 33 

500 " 0040020000 6 

— 39 
Priv. Frank E. McMaster, .200 " 3 4 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 42 

500 " 2 5 3 4 5 4 4 4 4 35 

— 77 
Lieut. Edward H. Keyes, .200 " 4544555454 45 

500 " 2 3 5 4 5 4 5 5 4 5 42 

— 87 
Priv. Joseph E. Farron, . .200 " 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 40 

500 " 3 3 3 4 3 4 4 2 5 31 

— 71 
Musician Williston Carll, .200 " 3444345443 38 

500 " 3 4 4 4 5 4 3 4 31 

— 69 
Priv. Donald J. McLeod, .200 « 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 5 38 

500 " 4 3 2 5 14 

— 52 
Corp. William H. Quigley, .200 " 4 4 3 2 3 3 4 4 3 4 34 

500 " 3 3 2 5 3 2 3 3 3 27 

— 61 
Priv. Robert J. Alderton, .200 " 3432453425 35 

500 " 4 3 2 2 4 4 4 4 5 2 34 

— 69 
Sergt. Harry C. McMaster, .200 " 244335 4 433 35 

500 " 3 4 3 3 4 4 2 3 2 28 

— 63 
Capt. John J. Monahan, . .200 " 4 4 4 3 4 3 5 4 4 4 39 

500 " 3 3 5 5 3 2 4 5 4 5 39 

— 78 

666 

The two competitors (without regard to class) making the highest 
aggregate scores, and who were awarded cups, were as follows : — 

Lieut. Edward H. Keyes, Troop F, 87 

Corp. William L. Swan, Troop D, . . . '. .82 

Individual prizes (medals) were won as follows : — 

First Prize, Sergt. E. F. Tandy, Troop D, . .79 

Second Prize, Private L. G. Smith, Troop D, . 78 

Troop D, First Battalion Cavalry, by virtue of its team making 
the highest score, is entitled to carry the " Guidon Trophy" for 
the year 1902. 



218 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



Analysis of Scores made in Regimental and Corps Com- 
petitions. 

first heavy artillery. 







One Third 


Total of 


Total of 


Total of 






of Total 


First 


Second 


Third 






Score. 


Five Shots. 


Five Shots. 


Five Shots. 


Battery A, . 


706 


235+ 


229 


244 


233 


Battery B, 








935 


312— 


306 


310 


319 


Battery C, 








760 


253+ 


250 


262 


248 


Battery D, 








783 


261 


242 


277 


264 


Battery E, 








912 


304 


300 


303 


309 


Battery F, 








846 


282 


266 


289 


291 


Battery G, . 








616 


205+ 


191 


191 


234 


Battery H, 








686 


229— 


213 


235 


238 


Battery I, 








714 


238 


216 


243 


255 


Battery K, 








751 


250+ 


247 


252 


252 


Battery L, 








635 


212— 


198 


226 


211 


Battery M, 








759 


253 


241 


245 


273 


Totals, 






• 


9,103 


3,034+ 


2,899 


3,077 


3,127 



SECOND INFANTRY. 



Company A, . 
Company B, . 
Company C, . 
Company D, . 
Company E, . 
Company F, . 
Company G, .« 
Company H, . 
Company I, . 
Company K, . 
Company L, . 
Company M, 

Totals, . 



856 
889 
822 
854 
857 
680 
839 
829 
852 
784 
754 
871 



9,887 



285+ 

296+ 

274 

285— 

286— 

227— 

280— 

276+ 

284 

261— 

251— 

290— 



3,295+ 



277 
284 
264 
289 
291 
223 
268 
256 
278 
230 
251 
283 



3,194 



289 
296 
274 
281 
282 
238 
287 
278 
290 
271 
253 
293 



3,332 



290 
309 
284 
284 
284 
219 
284 
295 
284 
283 
250 
295 



3,361 









FIFTH INFANTRY. 






Company A, . 
Company B, . 
Company C, . 
Company D, . 
Company E, . 
Company F, . 
Company G, . 
Company H, . 
Company I, . 
Company K, . 
Company L, . 
Company M, 






576 
564 
661 
534 
722 
888 
969 
579 
640 
655 
884 
769 


192 

188 

220+ 

178 

241— 

296 

323 

193 

213+ 

218+ 

295— 

256+ 


168 
164 
201 
178 
248 
297 
317 
189 
198 
190 
298 
244 


204 
200 
238 
162 
239 
295 
325 
203 
224 
230 
293 
254 


204 
200 
222 
194 
235 
296 
327 
187 
218 
235 
293 
271 


Totals, . 




• 


8,441 


2,814— 


2,692 


2,867 


2,882 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



219 



SIXTH INFANTRY. 







One Third 


Total of 


Total of 


Total of 




Score. 


of Total 


First 


Second 


Third 




Score. 


Five Shots. 


Five shots. 


Five Shots. 


Company A 


974 


325— 


318 


328 


328 


Company B, . 






835 


278+ 


281 


274 


280 


Company C, . 






945 


315 


307 


317 


321 


Company D, . 






835 


278+ 


279 


275 


281 


Company E, . 






823 


274+ 


265 


280 


278 


Company F, . 






699 


233 


213 


250 


236 


Company G, . 






753 


251 


234 


260 


259 


Company H, . 






833 


278— 


269 


279 


285 


Company I, . 






862 


287+ 


285 


290 


287 


Company K, . 






628 


209+ 


210 


216 


202 


Company L, . 






695 


232— 


219 


220 


256 


Company M, 






691 


230— 


227 


228 


236 


Totals, . 




• 


9,573 


3,191 


3,107 


3,217 


3,249 









EIGHTH 


INFANTRY. 






Company A, . 


573 


191 


184 


176 


213 


Company B; . 






834 


278 


280 


275 


279 


Company C, . 






657 


219 


214 


210 


233 


Company D, . 






877 


292+ 


292 


280 


305 


Company E, . 






585 


195 


200 


201 


184 


Company F, . 






681 


227 


213 


220 


248 


Company G, . 






758 


253— 


253 


249 


256 


Company H, . 






705 


235 


214 


241 


250 


Company I, . 






919 


306+ 


297 


309 


313 


Company K, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Company L, . 






469 


156+ 


161 


166 


142 


Company M, 






549 


183 


182 


194 


173 


Totals, . 




• 


7,607 


2,536— 


2,490 


2,521 


2,596 



NINTH INFANTRY. 



Company A, . 
Company B, . 
Company C, . 
Company D, . 
Company E, . 
Company F, . 
Company G, . 
Company H, 
Company I, . 
Company K,f 
Company L, . 
Company M, 

Totals, . 



847 
479 
420 

653 

640 

765 

337* 

452 

787 
695 



6,075 



282+ 
160— 
140 

218— 

213+ 

255 

112+ 

151— 

262+ 
232— 



2,025 



279 
141 
150 

210 
203 
251 
94 
142 

252 

228 



1,950 



286 
173 
139 

217 
219 
257 
127 
177 

262 
237 



2,094 



282 
165 
131 

226 
218 
257 
116 
133 

273 
230 



2,031 



* 13 men. 



f No team entered. 



220 



ADJUTAJSTT GENEKAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 



FIRST CORPS CADETS. 





Total 
Score. 


One Third 
of Total 
Score. 


Total of 

First 
Five Shots. 


Total of 

Second 

Five Shots. 


Total of 

Third 

Five Shots. 


Company A, . 
Company B, . 

Company C 

Company D, . 


799 
832 
852 

827 


266+ 

277+ 

284 

276— 


261 
264 
276 
258 


261 
280 
289 
286 


277 
288 
287 
283 


Totals, 


3,310 


1,103+ 


1,059 


1,116 


1,135 



SEC 


JOND CORPS CADETS. 






Company A, . 
Company B, . 
Company C, . 
Company D, . 


759 
720 
727 
795 


253 
240 
242+ 
265 


240 
237 
237 

262 


256 
236 
236 
260 


263 
247 
254 
273 


Totals, .... 


3,001 


1,000+ 


976 


988 


1,037 



NAVAL BRIGADE. 



Company A, 
Company B, 
Company C, 
Company D, 
Company E, 
Company F, 
Company G, 
Company H, 
Company I, 

Totals, 



561 
799 
580 

741 
818 
737 
870 
717 

5,823 



187 

266+ 

193+ 

247 " 

273— 

246— 

290 

239 

1,941 



164 
259 
183 

238 
271 
224 
281 
238 

1,858 



194 
261 
202 

256 
283 
263 
288 
239 

1,986 



203 
279 
195 

247 
264 
250 
301 
240 

1,979 



1902.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 



221 



EEPORTS OF COMMANDING OFFICERS. 



Headquarters First Brigade, M. V. M., 
Boston, Mass., Dec. 7, 1901. 

The Adjutant General, Massachusetts. 

Sir : — I have the honor to report that, in accordance with 
General Orders, No. 8, current series, A. G. O., the organizations 
assigned to this brigade (with the exception of the First Heavy 
Artillery) held their annual encampment at South Framingham, 
June 21 to 28, inclusive, the first day being regarded as " annual 
drill." The First Regiment Heavy Artillery, by permission of the 
United States government, performed its tour of duty, by battalions, 
at Fort Rodman, New Bedford, July 20 to August 10. 

I assumed command of the State camp ground on Thursday, 
June 20. All organizations, in accordance with brigade General 
Orders, No. 1, reported previous to 4 p.m., Friday, June 21. 

The attendance during the tour is shown in the following table : — 





Enrolment. 


Present. 


Per Cent. 


Brigadier General and Staff, 


18 


17 


94.44 


Second Regiment Infantry, .... 


811 


768 


94.70 


Sixth Regiment Infantry, .... 


800 


767 


95.88 


First Battalion Light Artillery, . 


211 


191 


90.52 


Troop F, Cavalry, . . . 


107 


107 


100.00 


Signal Corps, 


27 


25 


92.59 


Ambulance Corps detail, .... 


31 


31 


100.00 




2,005 


1,906 


95.06 



The camp ground was in excellent condition. The introduction 
of South Framingham water was much appreciated by the entire 
command. In view of the present abundant supply, I would 



222 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

respectfully recommend and strongly urge that better bathing 
facilities be provided before the next encampment, as the brigade 
has entirely outgrown those now afforded. I would also call the 
Quartermaster General's attention to the inadequate number of 
hydrants on the camp ground, and respectfully suggest a material 
increase, as in case of fire there would be imminent danger of an 
extensive conflagration among the storehouses, stables and other 
State buildings. 

The regular routine of duty, as prescribed in General Orders, 
No. 2, from these headquarters, was carried out, with the excep- 
tion that on Monday and Tuesday, June 24 and 25, a tour in the 
open country was substituted. This special tour of duty was an 
arduous one, owing to the excessively hot weather, the temperature 
ranging from 90° to 95° at midday. 

Friday, June 28, the brigade was honored by a visit from His 
Excellency the Governor. The day was designated as a general 
visiting day, the public gaining admission by means of a special 
pass. A review was tendered to and accepted by His Excellency 
but, owing to excessive heat, the ceremony was much curtailed, 
the inspection of personal appearance being omitted. 

The rations furnished by the State through the Commissary 
General were excellent in quality and abundant in quantity, and 
the system carried out the past two years reflects the greatest 
credit on the head of that department, Gen. F. W. Wellington, 
and his assistants. I trust the method may be continued in the 
future. 

Sunday was a day of rest, visitors being excluded and drills 
suspended. A thorough inspection was made by the commanding 
officers of the various sub-divisions of the brigade, followed by 
religious services under the auspices of the regimental chaplains. 

One of the pleasant features of the encampment was the large 
tent provided by the Young Men's Christian Association for social 
and religious purposes. It was open at all times, from reveille to 
tattoo, and every facility for social intercourse, for reading and 
for correspondence was furnished to officers and men, without 
charge. It is a feature that I trust may be continued from year 
to year. 

The discipline of the camp was not what it should have been, 
line officers seeming unable at times to control their men after taps. 
The trouble was largely attributable to the lack of competence of 
a few company commanders, but it affected the good order and 
discipline of the entire brigade. There was a marked improve- 
ment in the personal appearance of both officers and men since the 
last encampment. Military courtesy was poor. Guard duty was 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 223 

fairly well performed, but a great improvement could and should 
be made in this direction. The quarters of officers and men were 
in many cases very unsoldierly, too many unmilitary furnishings 
and needless personal baggage being in evidence. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Thos. R. Mathews, 

Brigadier General. 



Headquarters First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., 
Boston, Dec. 15, 1901. 

The Adjutant General, Massachusetts. 

Sir : — I have the honor herewith to submit my report on the 
tour of instruction of this command, July 20 to Aug. 10, 1901, at 
Fort Rodman, New Bedford, under General Orders, No. 8, and 
Special Orders, No. 86, both current series, from your office ; 
letter of instructions from the office of the Adjutant General of 
the Army, dated April 25 ; Special Orders, No. 108 ; headquarters 
Department of the East, and letters of instruction from the same 
headquarters, dated May 11, May 17 and July 8 ; together with 
General Orders, Nos. 6 to 9, inclusive, current series, from these 
headquarters, whereof copies accompany this report as enclosures. 

It affords me the utmost satisfaction to acknowledge the deep 
interest in the work of the regiment shown by the Honorable 
Secretary of War, by Maj. Gen. John R. Brooke, commanding 
the Department of the East, and by Col. Wallace F. Randolph, 
chief of artillery. Every possible courtesy was extended by the 
War Department to the command, and nothing was left undone 
which might enable it to derive the maximum of benefit from its 
tour. The formal visit of Secretary Root and Colonel Randolph 
to Fort Rodman, and their active interest in the routine work of 
the batteries on duty at that time at the post, did much to stimu- 
late the enthusiasm of the officers and men of the entire regiment. 
By permission of Colonel Randolph, I append hereto a copy of a 
personal letter, relating to the result of his observations. 

1. Preliminary Training. — By direction of the Secretary of 
War, permission was granted detachments from the regiment to 
visit the several defences on the Massachusetts coast, prior to the 
date of the annual encampment, for the purpose of obtaining 
instruction and preliminary drill. On further consideration, how- 
ever, it was deemed wise to confine the preparatory work of the 
regiment to armory instruction, limiting that instruction to such 
as might be necessary to fit the command for the service of one 
type of gun. This armory work followed the lines laid down in 



224 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

1900. In each battery there were organized permanent gun de- 
tachments, ammunition, range-finding and signal details. The 
men assigned to these duties were carefully selected from among 
the long-service men of the command, and, on the recommendation 
of their battery commanders, were furnished with certificates of 
proficiency on demonstrating their fitness for the special details 
to which they had thus been permanently assigned. Each battery 
thus had under permanent detail for instruction in the special 
duties devolving upon coast artillery two sergeants, three cor- 
porals and twenty-four ("first class") privates. The remaining 
privates were given general artillery instruction, and were encour- 
aged to fit themselves for promotion to vacancies occurring among 
the permanently organized details. The ordered State armory 
inspections, in March and April, were followed in June by a rigid 
and searching series of battery inspections by the field officers of 
the regiment, with a view to the correction of such faults as had 
been developed. As a result, the several batteries were enabled 
to report for their practical work at the guns in a fairly uniform 
condition of efficiency. 

2. General Scheme for Tour. — Experience having amply 
demonstrated the impracticability of attempting to train twelve 
batteries in the intricate work of coast artillery within a single 
period of eight days, and at a single post of moderate armament, 
a new method was determined upon for the tour. It was decided 
to organize a permanent staff for post administration and for pur- 
poses of instruction, to serve during the entire tour, while the 
battalions of the regiment were ordered to take post at Fort Rod- 
man in rotation, thus bringing four batteries under observation 
and instruction during each eight days' period. The method 
proved an unqualified success. With ample time and material at 
command, and with comparatively a small body of men under 
instruction, it was found possible to accomplish tangible results ; 
and each battery was enabled to return to its home station with 
the satisfactory consciousness that, under painstaking and sys- 
tematic instruction, it had demonstrated its ability to serve effi- 
ciently the modern ordnance of our recently completed system of 
coast defences. The establishment of a permanent post staff also 
proved its value, resulting in administration without delay or 
friction, and in uniform and progressive instruction in each bat- 
talion. The officers and non-commissioned staff officers on duty 
during the entire tour were the following : Col. J. A. Frye, com- 
manding post; Lieut. -Col. C. B. Woodman, instructor in artillery 
drill, and post trial officer; Maj. C. P. Nutter, instructor in gun- 
nery, and post ordnance officer ; Capt. R. Wolcott, post adjutant ; 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 225 

First Lieut. J. S. Cushing, post commissary; Capt. J. S. Keenan 
(on retired list, but volunteering for tour), aide-de-camp, and 
acting post quartermaster; Com. Sergt. W. J. Mcintosh, Pay 
Sergt. G. R. Russell, Drum Maj. J. F. Clark. The remaining 
field officers reported for duty with their respective battalions, 
while the staff and non-commissioned staff officers not noted above 
were assigned to duty in special orders for eight days each. 
Many of the field, staff and line officers, together with certain of 
the non-commissioned staff officers and other enlisted men of the 
regiment, voluntarily performed duty beyond the eight days' 
period required by statute, and their interest and zeal should re- 
ceive suitable acknowledgment. 

3. The Gamp. — With but four batteries in camp at one time, it 
was found practicable to lay out the streets with more attention to 
the health and comfort of the command. The line officers' and 
battery streets were wide, and ample space was left between tents. 
The recent issue of brown canvas tentage proved a great addition 
to the comfort of the command. Camp was pitched under the 
supervision of Lieutenant Colonel Woodman, to whom reported a 
guard detail from Battery E, remaining on duty until the arrival of 
the First Battalion at the post. The command is under obligations 
to Captain Landy of the State arsenal for his personal attention to 
the issue of tentage, and his supervision of the erection of cook- 
houses and sinks. Through the personal interest of Congressmen 
Greene and Powers, improvements are to be made on the parade 
at the post, and the coming year will find it even better adapted 
for use as a militia camp of instruction. As in former years, 
Mayor Ashley and the officers of the city government of New Bed- 
ford rendered material assistance to the command, causing the 
camp to be piped, furnishing water free of charge, and showing 
their interest in many other ways which were much appreciated. 

4. First Battalion. — Maj. P. A. Dyar, with batteries A, G, H 
and L, reported at the post at 4 p.m., July 20, having taken but 
one hour and fifty-five minutes in transit from the South Armory 
in Boston. Guard was at once mounted, and the batteries settled 
themselves in quarters. The battalion staff consisted of First 
Lieut. J. M. Portal, acting adjutant and range officer, and First 
Lieut. B. E. Grant, acting signal officer. The aggregate battalion 
strength for the eight days' tour, commissioned and enlisted, was 
1,960, of which there were present for duty 1,841, or 93 9 per 
cent. On July 21, a 1,000-yard base line was surveyed and laid 
out by First Lieut. W. M. Foster, in readiness for the practice 
with the 8-inch rifle, while great-gun and sub-calibre targets were 
prepared under the supervision of Major Nutter, and moored by 



226 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 

Capt. C. W. Holmes at ranges plotted from the base stations and 
indicated by the signal detachments. Under instruction by Major 
Dyar, a gun detachment of commissioned officers was drilled prior 
to the scheduled work by the permanent battery detachments. 
Eight shots, two by each battery, were fired by this battalion, 
using the 8-inch rifle in the west emplacement, with 123 pounds 

B. P. powder (I. V., 1725), and a 300-pound target practice C. I. 
projectile. The ranges varied from 4,395 to 4,540 yards. Two 
of these shots would have struck a battleship of the "Borodino" 
class, thus giving 25 per cent, as the figure of merit for the battal- 
ion. The battalion was relieved and returned to its home stations 
on July 27, turning over the camp to its successor in a condition 
of proper police. The discipline, infantry drill and ceremonies of 
the battalion were good during the tour. Of the commissioned 
and enlisted strength of the battalion, 35.7 per cent. (88) were in the 
service of the United States in 1 898. To the deep regret of the regi- 
ment, First Lieut. W. J. Mudge of Battery G- was stricken with an 
acute attack of Bright's disease, and died in St. Luke's hospital, 
New Bedford, on July 28. Lieutenant Mudge had served with the 
regiment for upwards of twelve years, including its term of volun- 
teer service in 1898, and his loss came keenly home to the com- 
mand. The regulation escort was paraded at his funeral on July 
31, and the customary emblems of mourning were ordered to be 
worn by the officers of the regiment. 

5. Second Battalion. — Major G-. F. Quinby, with batteries B, 

C, D and K, reported at the post at 4 p.m., July 27, having dupli- 
cated the excellent time record of the First Battalion in transit 
from home stations. The post guard was at once mounted, and 
the incoming battalion then took possession of the quarters vacated 
by its predecessor. The battalion staff was made up of First 
Lieut. W. M. Foster, adjutant and acting range officer, and First 
Lieut. J. A. Curtin, signal officer. The aggregate battalion 
strength, commissioned and enlisted, for the eight days' tour, was 
1,990, of which there were present for duty 1,883, or 94.6 per 
cent. Each battery fired two shots from the 8-inch B. L. R., west 
emplacement, with the same charge and projectile as that issued to 
the First Battalion. Ranges varied from 4,383 to 4,472 yards. 
The command had the marked advantage of being able to avail 
itself of the experience gained in the instruction of its predecessor, 
and its firing was of the most effective kind. Of its eight shots, 
no less than six would have struck a battleship of the type selected 
as target, thus giving the battalion a figure of merit of 75 per cent. 
Prior to the scheduled gun drills of the batteries, a detachment of 
commissioned officers was thoroughly drilled by Major Quinby in 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 227 

the service of the piece. The battalion was relieved On August 3, 
leaving its camp thoroughly policed. The discipline of the com- 
mand was good, but one enlisted man being court-martialled for a 
minor offence. Infantry drill and ceremonies were good during 
the tour. Of the commissioned and enlisted strength of the bat- 
talion, 24.7 per cent. (62) had service records with the volunteers 
of 1898. 

6. Third Battalion. — Batteries E, F, I and M reported through 
Major Nutter soon after noon on August 3, having been transported 
as individual commands from their home stations. No duty save 
guard mounting and evening parade was attempted on this date, 
the batteries employing the remainder of the time in settling quar- 
ters. The battalion staff serving with this command consisted 
of First Lieut. J. E. Totten, adjutant and acting signal officer, and 
First Lieut. J. B. Paine, range officer. The customary gun de- 
tachment of commissioned officers was drilled by Major Nutter 
preparatory to the scheduled drills of the batteries, and gunners' 
classes for non-commissioned officers were also held by him. To 
avoid possible danger from ricochets, the great-gun target for the 
practice firing of this battalion was moored farther to the south, at 
increased ranges. Two shots from the 8-inch B. L. R. mounted in 
the east emplacement were fired by each battery of this battalion, 
with the charge and projectile already noted. Ranges varied from 
6,742 to 6,773 yards, — 3.8 miles. Under the conditions, the firing 
of the command was excellent. Of the eight shots fired, four 
would have struck the type of battleship selected as a target. The 
first shot fired by Battery E, at a range of 6,748 yards, pierced 
the apex of the conical target at which the fire of the gun was 
directed. The firing of this battery was witnessed by Secretary 
Root and Colonel Randolph. The battalion attained a figure of 
merit of 50 per cent. Of the commissioned and enlisted strength of 
the command, aggregating 2,006 for the eight days' tour, there were 
present for duty 1,980, or 98.7 per cent. The battalion was re- 
lieved on August 10, when regimental headquarters also left the 
post. The camp was left standing, for later occupancy by the 
Naval Brigade. A thorough inspection by Lieut. Col. J. T. 
Soutter, A. I. C, developed the fact that the post was left prop- 
erly policed. The discipline of this battalion was good, though 
four enlisted men were brought before regimental court martials 
for minor offences. The ceremonies of the command were good, 
but weather conditions caused the omission of practically all infan- 
try drill. Of the commissioned and enlisted strength of the battal- 
ion, 28.3 per cent. (72) were in the service of the United States 
during the war with Spain. 



228 



ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 



7. Strength Present. — Excluding bandsmen and field musicians, 
the commissioned and enlisted regimental strength was 776 ; 
of these, 238, or 30.6 per cent., had served in the war of 1898. 
To the presence of so many veteran officers and men must be 
ascribed much of the efficiency of the command. It certainly 
should be a cause for congratulation that devotion to the service 
and the regiment prompts the continued re-enlistment of men who 
already have faithfully served their full original terms. The ap- 
pended table exhibits the strength present and absent during the 
period of the encampment. Though the duty performed by regi- 
mental headquarters was distributed over the entire period, it is 
here computed, for convenience of comparison, on the basis of an 
eight days' tour. 

First Heavy Artillery, Fort Rodman, 1901. {Strength present during 

Encampment, by Days.) 





1st. 


2d. 


3d. 


4th. 


5 tin. 


6ila. 


7th. 


» • • 


71 


71 


71 


71 


71 


71 


71 




54 


56 


57 


57 


56 


56 


56 




59 


59 


60 


60 


60 


60 


60 




55 


60 


60 


60 


59 


58 


57 




57 


59 


61 


61 


61 


61 


59 




63 


63 


63 


63 


63 


63 


63 




53 


60 


60 


63 


63 


62 


61 




53 


57 


57 ; 


57 


57 


57 


'57 




54 


62 


63 


63 


63 


63 


63 




63 


63 


63 


63 


63 


62 


62 




58 


60 


61 


58 


58 


56 


55 




47 


56 


56 


57 


58 


58 


58 




61 


62 


62 


62 


62 

793 


62 

789 


61 

783 




748 


788 


794 


795 




67 


27 


22 


21 


23 


27 


32 




815 


815 


816 


816 


816 


816 


815 


sent, . 


91.7 


96.6 


97.3 


97.4 


97.1 


96.6 


96.0 



8th. 



Headquarters, 
Battery A, 
Battery B, 
Battery C, 
Battery D, 
Battery E, 
Battery F, 
Battery G, 
Battery H, 
Battery I, 
Battery K, 
Battery L, 
Battery M, 

Present, . 

Absent, . 

Enrolment, 

Per cent, present, 



71 

56 
60 
57 
59 
63 
61 
56 
63 
62 
55 
58 
61 



782 

33 

815 

95.9 



It is worthy of note that headquarters, batteries E and B, each 
carried through the tour 100 per cent, of their strength, while bat- 
teries I, H and M had upwards of 98 per cent, each present for 
duty during the encampment. 

8. Great-gun Practice. — At this encampment the regiment as 
a whole obtained its first opportunity for firing modern guns, with 
service charges and projectiles, under unhampered conditions. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 229 

All of the batteries had had firing with the 8-inch converted rifle, 
M. L., at the tours of 1894, 1896 and 1897 ; Battery B, during its 
volunteer service in 1898, had conducted the test firing of the 
8-inch B. L. R. at Fort Constitution, N. H. ; while batteries E, F, 
I and M, stationed at Fort Warren in the same year, had been 
present during the firing of the 10-inch B. L. R. by the regular 
batteries at that post, and had profited to some extent by their 
observations. Under the conditions, the firing by the regiment at 
the late tour was eminently satisfactory. The enclosed diagram 
will serve to indicate the results attained. For the purpose of 
securing uniformity, the practice of all the batteries was conducted 
under the immediate supervision of the regimental commander and 
Major Nutter, acting ordnance officer and gunnery instructor. 
While this method necessarily encroached upon the legitimate ex- 
ercise of their functions by the battery commanders, it yet found 
its justification in the fact that the tour was essentially one of 
primary instruction. At future tours, with the experience gained 
through the practical work of the present year, battery commanders 
and their subalterns will be required to demonstrate their fitness 
for their commissions by exercising entire control of the gun and 
magazine service and firing of their respective commands. It is 
worthy of note that no officers or men of the regular establishment 
were detailed for duty with the command during this tour. The 
regiment itself furnished its own instructors, and carried out to 
the last detail the service routine of a coast artillery garrison. It 
established its own base line and observation stations, plotted its 
shots, did its signalling, prepared and served its ammunition, used 
with intelligence and effect the range tables applicable to its work, 
and delivered a fire which in action would have been extremely 
effective. Save the damage to one telescopic sight, caused by 
momentary carelessness, the costly and intricate equipment of the 
post was turned over uninjured by the command at the close of its 
tour. Through the thoughtfulness of the department commander, 
an ordnance machinist from Watertown arsenal was ordered to 
the post, to be in readiness to make any repairs on guns or car- 
riages which might be rendered necessary during the firing ; his 
services, however, were, not required. 

9. Sub-calibre Practice. — The .45 calibre tubes used at the 
encampment of 1900 were again employed for the training of gun- 
ners in the use of the sight. Excellent practice was made at a 
target moored at 900 yards south-west from the western emplace- 
ment, several hundred rounds of ammunition being expended in 
this manner. While nothing can take the place of actual firing 
with the service charge and projectile, it yet remains the fact that 



230 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

sub-calibre practice affords a valuable and inexpensive supple- 
mentary means of training gunners. Two Driggs-Schroeder one- 
pounder R. F. guns were taken to the post by the command, to be 
used for saluting purposes. It is purposed in the future, as a 
means of training against torpedo boat attack, to obtain practice 
with these guns, both with service charges and with the .45 calibre 
drill cartridge. 

10. Range-finding. — The several battery range-finding details 
were supervised in their operations by Lieutenants J. B. Paine, 
Portal, Foster and Stevens. Observations were taken from the 
two stations by means of an azimuth circle and an engineer's 
transit. A third station, using the depression position finder be- 
longing to the post, was established under the supervision of Cap- 
tain Lombard, for the purpose of checking the observations taken 
from the ends of the base line. Two competitions were held, with 
judgment based on the speed and accuracy of observers ; and the 
fact was developed that certain of the enlisted men under detail for 
this work were admirably adapted to the performance of the duty. 
During the coming winter a second azimuth circle will be added to 
the regimental equipment, thus completing a two-station outfit, 
while dummy azimuths will be issued to each battery, to enable 
the range details, by armory practice, to acquire proficiency in 
rapid reading of the instrument. 

11. Signalling. — The signalling during the tour was under 
the supervision of Lieutenants Curtin, Totten and Grant. As a 
means of transmitting angles to the plotting station during firing, 
the use of the flag proved both slow and unsatisfactory. In 
future it is hoped that it will be found possible to substitute the 
telephone or dial-telegraph in this work. Flag signalling, how- 
ever, will be continued in all the batteries, for possible employ- 
ment in communication between shore and ship, or in other obvious 
contingencies. Torch signalling by night was successfully at- 
tempted at various times during the tour. 

12. Medical Department. — Through the untiring attention of 
the medical officers of the command, the returns of sick in hospital 
or in quarters were kept at low figures. Thorough daily inspec- 
tions of quarters, sinks, kitchens and the ration issue were made 
both by the battalion commander and the medical officer on duty 
at the time. The highest number reported in hospital was two; 
in quarters, eight. With one exception, and that not due to pre- 
ventable causes, these were minor cases. On five days of the 
encampment the command showed a clean sick report. The water, 
being drawn through temporary piping, was unpalatable, while the 
sinks, though constantly under supervision, were unsatisfactory. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 231 

It is hoped that a permanent water supply, together with modern 
drainage, may be installed by the government, with the direct 
object of fitting this post as a training school for militia or volun- 
teer artillery. 

13. Rations. — The ration issued was of excellent quality, 
and was well prepared by the enlisted cooks of the several bat- 
teries. Certain of the batteries supplemented the regular issue 
by purchases from the battery fund. This, while perfectly per- 
missible, yet was unnecessary. The headquarters mess confined 
itself to the issued ration, with satisfactory results. It has been 
demonstrated that men fresh from indoor life develop abnormal 
appetites when sharply exercised in the open air and on the sea 
coast, and it thus happens that battery commanders find them- 
selves compelled to over-draw the scheduled allowance of com- 
ponent parts. It is recommended, however, that they confine 
themselves to the simple mess bill as established by the Commis- 
sary Department. The command is under obligations to Brig. 
Gen. F. W. Wellington, commissary general, whose presence and 
active personal interest were of the utmost benefit. 

14. Infantry Drill. — The batteries of the command were pre- 
sumed to have had a sufficiency of infantry drill at their home sta- 
tions, and therefore this feature of training was practically eliminated 
in laying out the work of the tour. No battery drills as infantry 
were ordered, while but one hour daily was allotted to battalion 
drill in close order. In many instances even this hour was not 
utilized, through adverse weather conditions or other causes. 
Such drill as was obtained was satisfactory. Battery commanders, 
under orders, were required to take command of a battalion at 
some period during their tours. The ceremonies of the command 
were good, with marked steadiness on the part of enlisted men in 
ranks, and proper alignments and distances in marching. 

15. Alarm Drills. — Each battalion was turned out, at some 
time during its tour, at an hour known in advance only to the 
post commander. Sealed instructions, dealing with some simple 
problem of the attack and defence of a coast work, were handed 
to the battalion commander for execution. In every instance the 
batteries were in line, under arms, in less than ninety seconds 
from the sounding of the call. The problems were intelligently 
and promptly worked out, the guns and magazines being served, 
and infantry supports rushed into their proper positions, without 
confusion or undue loss of time. These exercises have proved of 
value in developing alertness of action on the part of the men, and 
rapidity of thinking, under the stress of excitement, on the part of 
the officers concerned. 



232 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

16. Guard Duty. — The concentration of attention on artillery 
work proper, during the months immediately preceding the tour, 
was not without its effect on the guard duty performed at Fort 
Rodman. It hardly could be rated as better than fair. From the 
light strength present during each week, it was found necessary to 
place on post all the recruits of the command. Every private in 
the regiment served at least one tour on guard, while a certain 
percentage was detailed for a second time. Under these condi- 
tions, the guard duty was unsatisfactory, and battery commanders 
will be required in the future to devote more attention to this im- 
portant detail. 

17. Discipline. — The discipline of the command was good. 
But five cases, all of which were minor offences, were tried before 
the summary court during the three weeks of the encampment. 
The public was excluded from the reservation during the working 
hours of each day, being admitted freely between retreat and 
tattoo. If the government should deem it advisable to erect a 
fence or wall along the northern line of the reservation, it would 
do much to reduce the burden of guard duty, and would simplify 
the problem of maintaining discipline. The military courtesy of 
the command was excellent. I regret having to report that the 
enlisted men of the small regular detachment at the post were, as 
a rule, lax in the matter of saluting officers of the militia, while in 
certain instances their demeanor was positively discourteous. If 
I am not mistaken, orders were issued from the headquarters of 
the army, some years ago, directing the usual courtesies and com- 
pliments to be rendered to officers of militia on duty at camps of 
instruction on reservations garrisoned by regular troops. It is 
suggested that this order be reissued, since officers of militia coast 
artillery, while on duty at a government post, are constructively, if 
not actually, in the service of the United States, and should 
receive consideration accordingly. 

18. Official Visitors. — During the period of the encampment 
the following official guests were received at post headquarters : 
Hon. Elihu Root, Secretary of War ; Hon. John L. Bates, Lieu- 
tenant Governor of the Commonwealth, with a detail from the 
staff of the Commander-in-Chief; Hon. W. S. Greene, M. C. ; 
Mayor Ashley, with members of the New Bedford city govern- 
ment ; Mayor Coulter, with members of the Brockton city govern- 
ment ; Brigadier General Mathews, First Brigade, and Staff; Col. 
Charles Pfaff, retired, late commanding the regiment ; Brigadier 
General Dalton, Adjutant General ; Brigadier General Blood, 
Surgeon General ; Brigadier General Wellington, Commissary 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 233 

General; Brigadier General Brigham, Inspector General; Col. 
Wallace F. Randolph, chief of artillery, U. S. A. ; Maj. Goethals, 
Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. ; Captain Chamberlain, Artillery 
Corps, U. S. A. ; Captain Houston and officers of U. S. S. " Arnphi- 
trite ; " Capt. Hubert von Rebeur-Paschwitz, naval attache* to the 
German legation ; Col. C. K. Darling, Sixth Infantry ; Col. W. 
H. Oakes, Fifth Infantry, and staff; Capt. G. R. H. Buffinton, 
Naval Brigade and staff ; Colonel Cooke, retired, late Fifth Infan- 
try, U. S. A. ; Brig. Gen. Curtis Guild, Colonel King, Col. R. H. 
Morgan and Colonel Converse, late of the general staff of the 
Commonwealth. The interest in the work of the command indi- 
cated by the presence of these gentlemen was fully appreciated by 
the officers of the regiment. 

19. In General. — The appropriation of $2,500, made by the 
Legislature of 1899 for the equipment of the regiment, was 
allowed to remain unexpended up to the time of the late tour, in 
the hope that some way might be found through which the War 
Department could issue or loan to the command the text-books and 
instruments required in the prosecution of its work, thus sparing 
the Commonwealth an expense which should hardly be exacted 
from its treasury. Since the general government, however, is 
apparently unable to issue adequate equipment, this appropriation 
will be liberally drawn upon before the close of the year current ; 
and the winter period of armory drill and instruction will be 
marked by a better material provision for special work by the 
command than at any previous time since its assignment to the 
artillery arm of the service. The late tour at Fort Rodman served 
to demonstrate that the officers of the regiment, even with the 
crude appliances at their command, were able to train their men 
at home stations for effective work at modern guns in modern 
emplacements. With the more liberal allowance of appliances 
soon to be issued, and with the cordial support of the War Depart- 
ment, which now is assured, the future of the command in its 
special arm of service should be steadily, if slowly, progressive. 
The regiment now is coast artillery in fact as well as in name. 
That it approaches the standard of the regular establishment, 
none of its officers would assert ; that it is infinitely superior in 
efficiency to any hasty levy of volunteers, no trained observer can 
deny. As it stands to-day, it is a valuable factor in the general 
scheme of defence ; with systematic and progressive instruction, 
and through the unselfish devotion and interest of its officers and 
men, its value to the government may in the immediate future be 
doubled. Experience has demonstrated the wisdom of not requir- 



234 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 

ing too much in too limited a period from militia artillery, and the 
present policy of the regimental administration adheres closely to 
these lines. The work of the past year has been practical, and it 
has been honestly done ; the work of the coming year, while requir- 
ing more attention and study, will yet not be in advance of the 
capabilities of the officers and men of the command, and it may be 
confidently expected that the tour of 1902 will find the batteries 
prepared, without doubt or hesitation, to take station at any gun 
to which they may be assigned, in the comforting consciousness 
that earnest study and faithful drill have robbed the service of the 
terrors of un familiarity. 

In closing this report, I desire to express my deep appreciation 
of the loyal support of the officers and enlisted men of the regi- 
ment which I have the honor to command, from whom I have at 
times been obliged, by the peculiar circumstances attending the 
development of militia artillery, to require far more of study and 
effort than is expected from the average militiaman. The fact 
that these unpaid officers and men have met such exacting require- 
ments not only uncomplainingly but even enthusiastically, should 
be a source of congratulation to the Commonwealth, while it also 
may serve to account for whatever of progress has marked the 
record for the year. I beg also to acknowledge the material 
assistance rendered the command by Lieut. Col. J. T. Soutter, 
A. I. G., who was present during the late tour; and to record 
my appreciation of your own interest and co-operation in the work 
of developing the arm of the service with which you, as a com- 
missioned officer, were identified in 1861-65. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

James A. Frte, 
Colonel First Massachusetts Artillery. 

Headquarters First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V, M., 
Fort Rodman, Mass., July 20, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 9. 

The drill routine to be followed during the present tour at this post is 
exhibited in tabular form on the following page. The 8-inch B.L.R. are 
designated respectively as (west) No. 1 and (east) No. 2. The gun 
detachments and ammunition details from the several batteries will re- 
port at these emplacements for drill as below indicated. Range-finding 
and signal details, at the hours prescribed, will report to the permanent 
or acting regimental range and signal officers, at the left of the color 
line, taking station as directed. Summarized b} 7 drill periods, the daily 
work of the command will be assigned as follows : — 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 235 

First Period, 8 to 9 a.m. 

(a) Senior and second senior batteries of battalion : gun detachments 
and ammunition details take post respectively at Nos. 1 and 2, 8-inch 
B.L.R. (&) Third and fourth batteries of battalion: range-finding 
details report as indicated. 

Second Period, 9 to 10 a.m. 
(a) Senior and second batteries : signal details report as indicated. 
(6) Third and fourth batteries : gun detachments and ammunition details 
respectively at Nos. 1 and 2, 8-inch B.L.R. 

Third Period, 10 to 11 a.m. 

(a) Senior and second batteries : gun detachments and ammunition 
details respectively at Nos. 1 and 2, 8-inch B.L.R. (6) Third and fourth 
batteries : signal details report as indicated. 

Fourth Period, 11 to 12 a.m. 

(a) Senior and second batteries : range-finding details report as indi- 
cated, (b) Third and fourth batteries : gun detachments and ammuni- 
tion details respectively at Nos. 1 and 2, 8-inch B.L.R. 

Fifth Period, 2 to 3 p.m. 

Battalion drill as infantry, in close order. Each battery commander 
will be required to command the battalion on at least one drill during 
the tour. 



236 



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1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JSTo. 7. 237 



Sixth Period, 3 to 4 p.m. 
This period will be reserved for sub-calibre or service charge practice 
with the 8-inch B.L.R., or for range-finding or signal competitions. 
Details relative to such competitions will be published in special orders. 

Alarm Drill. 

Owing to the shortness of the tour, definite assignments for manning 

the works will not be made. Should " To Arms " be sounded, however, 

at any hour of the day or night, batteries will instantly fall in on 

the parade, in their approximate places in battalion line, and await 

orders. Uniformity of dress, under such conditions, will not be held 

essential. Officers will equip themselves with the web belt and revolver, 

enlisted men will fall in with the rifle and web belt. Field and staff 

officers, battery commanders and the non-commissioned staff, on the 

sounding of this call, will instantly report to the commanding officer on 

the parade, for orders. The band without instruments, will report at the 

right of the color-line. 

By order of Colonel Frye, 

Roger Wolcott, 

Captain and Adjutant. 

Headquarters of the Army, 

Office of the Chief of Artillery, 

Washington, Dec. 10, 1901. 

Col. James A. Frye, Commanding First Massachusetts Artillery, South 

Armory, Boston. 

My Dear Colonel : — Your letter of Dec. 2, 1901, has been received. 
Last summer, upon the occasion of the inspection of the camp of the 
Third Battalion of your regiment by the^Secretary of War, I was greatly 
impressed. Targets had been placed, base lines established and prac- 
tice begun, — this not under the eye of an instructor, but solely upon 
the initiative and responsibility of yourself and your officers. Such 
work shows the result of faithful and intelligent training, and speaks 
more forcibly than the report of any inspector possibly could. 

The work of your regiment, as evidenced by the earnestness of the 
officers and the zeal and intelligence of the men, has prompted me to 
recommend in my annual report that " operations on an extended scale 
be undertaken for the coming summer, utilizing as far as possible the 
different militia organizations that are interested in coast artillery work. 
Preparations are now under way looking to the equipment of the com- 
mands that are necessary to carry out these manoeuvres. It is sug- 
gested that an invitation be extended to the navy to participate, so that 
a definite reply can be obtained at the earliest moment, and that the 
problems of attack and defence be outlined during the coming winter." 
Sincerely yours, 

Wallace F. Randolph, 

Chief of Artillery. 



238 



ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 




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1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 239 



Headquarters Second Brigade, M. V. M., 
Boston, Sept. 20, 1901. 
Brig. Gen. Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General, State House, Boston. 

Sir : — I have the honor to make report of the annual tour of 
camp duty of the Second Brigade (excepting the Eighth Regiment 
Infantry and Battery A, Light Artillery) at South Framingham, 
July 20 to 26. 

Pursuant to General Orders, No. 8, current series, A. G. O., I 
assumed command of the camp ground on Friday, July 19. The 
various organizations reported on Saturday, July 20, between 10 
and 11 o'clock a.m., except the First Battalion Cavalry, which, by 
permission, reported one hour later. 

The troops on their arrival found tents and tent floors in piles 
on the field, and immediately began to pitch camp. This was 
done in a very satisfactory manner before dinner. The absence 
of the Eighth Regiment and Battery A gave more room, and the 
camp was laid out with company streets thirty feet wide and a 
space of ten feet was left between the back of tents, "which was of 
great advantage in the matter of ventilation. 

Guard mounting took place at 2 p.m., and the regular routine 
was taken up. On Sunday all drills were 'omitted. 

The brigade was reviewed by Major General Bancroft, retired, 
on Tuesday, and by Brigadier General Dalton on Wednesday. 
On Thursday His Excellency the Governor and Commander-in- 
Chief visited the camp and reviewed the brigade. 

The weather throughout the tour was everything that could be 
desired. While quite warm the first few days, it did not interfere 
with the work. 

The drill periods were used largely for battalions and regiments 
in extended order, and an improvement was noted each day. 
Guard duty was but fairly performed, and an effort will be made 
the coming winter to have the enlisted men thoroughly instructed 
in this important duty. The cavalry did some out-post work, but 
other than that all manoeuvres were confined to the camp ground. 

The commissary arrangements, under the direction of Brigadier 
General Wellington, were excellent, and I consider the troops 
better and more economically fed than ever before. 

The First Battalion of Cavalry had their fall drill July 19, 
marching from Boston. On that night they bivouacked at Need- 
ham, continuing the march to camp the next morning. On Friday 
morning, July 26, the cavalry broke camp early and marched to 
Boston. The Ninth and Fifth Regiments, having decided to take 
their fall drill while at Framingham, did not break camp .until Sat- 



240 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

urday afternoon, July 27. The regimental commanders were given 
authority to use the time from Friday noon as they might see fit. 

There was an unusually large number of new men in the organ- 
izations this year, and considering that, and the fact that a large 
number of officers were new to their positions, the work as a whole 
was done very satisfactorily. 

The buildings at brigade headquarters are in poor condition, and 
I recommend that they be thoroughly repaired before another camp. 
I also recommend that the present sinks be destroyed and others 
built in a new location. The bath houses should also be repaired, 
and better accommodations given to both officers and men. 

The Eighth Regiment performed its tour of camp duty and 
annual drill at Boxford, and Battery A, Light Artillery, at Saga- 
more. Reports of the commanders of these organizations have 
been forwarded. 

Very respectfully, 

J. H. Whitney, 

Brigadier General. 



Headquarters Eighth Regiment Infantry, 

Second Brigade, M. V. M , 
Salem, Mass., Aug. 30, 1901. 

Adjutant General, State of Massachusetts, Boston, Mass. 

Sir : — I have the honor J;o report that, pursuant to General 
Orders, No. 8, current series, A. G-. O., dated April 30, 1901, the 
Eighth Regiment Infantry encamped at Boxford, Mass., from 
July 6 to July 13, inclusive. 

The camp was designated and known as Camp William C. Dow, 
in memory of a former officer of this command, who gave his life 
in the service of the republic. 

The tour of duty was chiefly devoted to instructing troops in 
military hygiene. In all wars in which the United States has 
engaged, her volunteer forces have been mobilized in camps of 
more or less permanency, where they have been reduced by infec- 
tious diseases, the spread of which have been favored by the 
aggregation of young and susceptible soldiers, ignorant of, and 
careless in regard to, the proper rules of camp sanitation. In all 
the large camps of instructions established in the United States in 
the summer of 1898, every volunteer regiment developed typhoid 
fever, some as early as the third week after going into camp. As 
the agencies which cause most of the infectious diseases are 
known, can be controlled and their effect prevented, it is of the 
utmost importance that the rules of military hygiene should be 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 241 

studied and practised by every military organization that has any 
ambition to train its members to become soldiers. A man who 
does not know enough to keep well, whatever his other military 
qualification, is a unit of weakness in a command. In the summer 
of 1898 we saw regiments weakened by disease and men dying 
before they could prepare themselves to face an enemy, because 
proper sanitary conditions were not known or appreciated. Most 
of the regiments were militia organizations expanded to meet the 
requirements of the service. The experience of that summer 
suggests that there are many things that have not been taught 
the militia in their State camps, which are as feasible and of 
more practical importance than ceremonies and camp and quarter 
guards. As disease disables more men than bullets, a soldier's 
training should teach him how to avoid his deadliest enemy. Our 
militia has devoted much time to learning how to make a brave 
showing on parade, but has had no instruction or practice in learn- 
ing how to keep alive under service conditions. 

As substantially everything has been provided for the militia 
on the camp ground at South Framingham, and there is a feeling 
in the Framingham atmosphere that the State is always going to 
look after sanitation, and give to its troops encamped there the 
utmost opportunity to repeat the drills and ceremonies which have 
become a Framingham tradition, it is not practical to expect the 
militia to develop much enthusiasm over camp sanitation in a 
place where their past experience Jias rather inculcated the idea 
that their whole duty in this direction has been performed by 
keeping the streets free from banana skins, orange peel and other 
litter. It seems necessary to get away from Framingham and its 
traditions to turn over a new leaf. 

It was attempted during this tour of duty at Boxford to give 
a kind of instruction which we have never received, and the lack 
of which led to the deplorable sick rates in Massachusetts regi- 
ments during the Spanish war. The field where the camp was 
pitched was adapted to this purpose. There was nothing to be- 
gin with except the ground and a suitable water supply. The 
camp site was surveyed and a system of drainage prepared by the 
regimental quartermaster. Before the regiment arrived, sinks 
were dug and covered with cheap wooden buildings, a slop sink 
was prepared for each company, and a hill-side plough run through 
the ground to loosen the earth where ditching was necessary. 
This work was performed by contract labor, as otherwise it would 
have been impossible to get the camp in running order before the 
end of the tour, — the object of the tour being not so much to 
instruct the troops how to pitch a camp, as how to keep a camp 



24:2 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

free from disease by a proper disinfection and disposal of filth. 
A crematory was erected and a boiled-water plant installed. A 
plan of the camp, drawn to a scale, accompanies this report as an 
enclosure. 

The filth of the camp was disinfected and disposed of in the fol- 
lowing manner : The contents of the sinks were each day treated 
three times with milk of lime and crude petroleum. The seats 
were provided with self closing covers, and were daily scrubbed 
with soap and hot water. The urinals were soaked with petro- 
leum. The walls of the buildings were whitewashed inside and 
out. Each sink was under the care of a corporal and four men 
detailed for the purpose. They were kept in excellent condition, 
and were at no time offensive to any sense. 

As the germs of contagion are often thrown off by the kidneys, 
it is of importance to prevent the pollution of the ground by urine. 
This is difficult at night. In the United States service the regi- 
ments solve this problem by placing a urine can at night in each 
company street; it is removed at reveille. I recommend such 
cans be furnished by the State. 

The kitchen garbage was collected and the solids cremated. 
The separation of liquids and solids was bothersome. The gar- 
bage barrels now in use are not suitable. Each receptacle should 
consist of two metallic half barrels with a close-fitting cover. One 
half should fit into the other. There should be a strong wire net- 
ting in the bottom of the uppei;half. The kitchen sinks were cov- 
ered with earth heaped around a box opening, in which were two 
wire screens, one within the other. The inner one was unattached, 
and bent into the shape of a wire box. It could be lifted out of 
the opening, and was used to drain garbage. Nothing but liquids 
were allowed in these sink holes. They were disinfected daily 
with milk of lime, and sealed to insect life with petroleum. The 
box openings were provided with self-closing covers. These sinks 
were at all times sweet and odorless. 

The crematory was improvised with materials collected near 
Boxford. It took care of the solid garbage of the camp. It had 
to be rebuilt once during the week. Undoubtedly any temporary 
affair will continually break down by the overheating to which its 
materials are subjected. The Conley camp crematory has been 
used with success in the United States Army. It is a box of cast 
iron, lined with asbestos, and can be taken apart and crated for 
transportation, like a buzzacott. It is said to have a capacity to 
cremate the garbage of a brigade. 

The transportation of swill is usually performed in an unsanitary 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JSTo. 7. 243 

and careless manner, resulting in much soil pollution from drip- 
ping. It was attempted with our limited transportation to have 
this important duty properly performed. I recommend that the 
State furnish a wagon adapted to this work. 

The policing of the camp was excellent, and was an intelligent 
attempt to have and keep the camp sanitarily clean. The under- 
lying principle of instruction in policing was to make it hot an eye 
service merely, but to prevent the many combinations of filth with 
the soil which may be unnoticed, but which make a compost at- 
traction to germ life and activity. 

The company streets were forty feet wide, crowned in the centre 
and sloped toward a gutter on each side. The tents were on both 
sides of the street, and were ditched into these gutters. Tent 
floors were not used. The men slept on bed sacks, filled with rye 
straw and placed above their rubber blankets. 

The cooking was done on buzzacotts. They were protected 
from rain by a wooden roof. The men used their mess kits. The 
rations were purchased by the regimental commissary. They were 
served at the company kitchens, and were usually eaten in the 
immediate vicinity. The issue and preparation of rations was sat- 
isfactory. 

The Second Corps of Cadets have two double revolving targets 
at Boxford. These were kept in constant use from 6.25 to 11.30 
a.m., and from 12.30 to 5 p.m. Most of this time was devoted to 
men who had never qualified. Sixty-seven men were qualified, 
and instruction was given to many others. It was intended to 
give to the qualified men of the regiment an opportunity to prac- 
tise firing under service conditions, but this had to be abandoned, 
owing to the lack of a suitable background. 

The hours of drill were devoted to work by battalion. Each 
battalion had a large field for its separate work, with ample ground 
to practise extended order. The available ground in the vicinity 
of the camp was not large enough for the regiment to take up ex- 
tended order. 

The success of the camp demonstrates that officers and men are 
ready and enthusiastic to undertake practical work, and are anx- 
ious to break away from the routine of close order drills and cere- 
monies to which the character of the State grounds at Framingham 
have limited the militia. 

When the Eighth Massachusetts Infantry, U. S. V., was mus- 
tered out of the service of the United States, I officially called the 
attention of Governor Wolcott to the fact that, as an officer of the 
State militia, I had learned nothing from my experience at Fram- 



244 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

ingham which was of practical value in the United States service. 
I did not mean to imply that the militia of this State was behind 
that of other States, or was not progressive, but that, from obser- 
vation of the various militia organizations called into the United 
States service, it was apparent that their previous training was not 
along lines which fitted them for the hardships of a campaign. 

The so-called camp at Framingham is not a real camp, but more 
like a post, where the State furnishes too many paraphernalia of 
comfort for her troops to learn how to care for themselves in the 
field. The routine there not only fails to teach the principles of 
camp sanitation, but the practice of crowding a brigade onto ter- 
ritory which should be occupied by a single regiment inculcates the 
idea that crowding is a military virtue. 

During the Spanish war over twenty thousand men were stricken 
with typhoid fever in the camps of mobilization. This was in a 
measure due to a lack of previous proper military instruction in 
the summer camps held by the militia of the various States,r and 
to the habit of overcrowding, which they had acquired in camps 
like our ordinary brigade camp at Framingham. 

It seems that the routine of any camp should be ordered with a 
view to instruct troops how to take care of themselves under 
service conditions. This cannot be done on terrain furnished 
with the comforts of an ordinary picnic ground, and a camp in 
such a place must necessarily assume the character of a military 
outing. 

After our experience in the Spanish war, where we saw officers 
and men sicken and die because they had not been taught in their 
militia camps how to be kind to themselves under the conditions 
which must always surround troops when called into service, it 
seems as if the character of these camps should undergo a com- 
plete change, and that the first object of a militia camp should be 
to teach officers and men how to keep themselves alive and well 
under service conditions. Work along this line is practical, and, 
as it appeals to the common-sense of officers and men, Will be 
taken up with enthusiasm under intelligent leadership. 

Next to taking care of himself, a soldier should be taught to 
shoot and how to conduct himself in the presence of an enemy. 
The fact that troops cannot be instructed in rifle practice at 
Framingham without danger to the inhabitants is alone sufficient 
to condemn the State grounds for use as a camp for military 
instruction. As we have occupied these grounds year after year, 
and repeated the same old drills on the same old field, we have 
dropped into a stereotyped form of devoting most of our time to 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 245 

perfecting ourselves in close order drill and ceremonies. Our 
standard of efficiency suggests rather the spectacular effect sought 
on the stage, where the sole aim of perfection is to please the eye 
with orderly and precise movements. This is not the object and 
end of drill. A certain amount of precision is necessary to bring 
troops into the presence of an enemy without confusion, but the 
important subject of instruction should be to teach troops how to 
act in the presence of an enemy. The close order drills which we 
practise at Framingham might bring us within a mile or two of an 
enemy ; but no serious attempt has ever been made, or can be 
made on the State grounds, to instruct troops how to get over the 
last two miles, which is the all-important problem of modern 
tactics. This can only be taught on varied ground. Until we 
break away from the level field at Framingham, we cannot hope 
to get out of the ruts, or teach the State troops the principles of 
tactics. Troops trained under such conditions and limitations may 
become great parade soldiers, but on the field of battle they will 
be a mob without leadership. 

I would respectfully call attention to the remarks of the Adjutant 
General on practical work in his reports for the year 1900, and to 
the recommendations of Gen. Wm. A. Bancroft in his report of 
the tour of the Second Brigade for the year 1900. 

I recommend that the use of the State grounds at Framingham 
be discontinued for military purposes, and that the infantry regi- 
ments be encamped for their annual tour of duty where they can 
receive the kind of training which they need to become soldiers. 

I realize that the State force is composed of volunteers, and 
must offer, to get its recruits, a kind of service they like. There 
are to-day, however, many in the State force who have seen enough 
to know that the military performances possible at Framingham turn 
out officers inefficient for field service. They are seriously anxious 
to become a part of a well-trained militia, and they realize that the 
training they have hitherto received is inadequate to fit them for 
field service. They desire instruction and practice which will fit 
them to perform their duties when called into service. It was this 
feeling in the Eighth Regiment which made the Boxford camp a 
success, and could at the present time be appealed to in the whole 
militia in an effort to take up practical work under conditions which 
will prevail in time of war. 

Very respectfully, 

William A. Pew, Jr., 
Colonel Eighth Infantry, M. V. M. 



246 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



Headquarters First Battalion Cavalry, M. V. M., 
Boston, Sept. 30, 1901. 

The Adjutant General, M. V. M., Boston, Mass. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of duty 
performed by this command from July 19 to 26, inclusive, in ac- 
cordance with General Orders, Nos. 8 and 12, A. G. O. 

The squadron left Boston at 9 o'clock a.m. Friday, July 19, 
the column comprising headquarters, troops A and D, and a train 
of three two-horse wagons. The route, as indicated by the ac- 
companying map, a copy of which was issued to each officer, lay 
through Jamaica Plain, the southern part of Newton, Highland - 
ville and Needham, camp being made in the afternoon in the latter 
town, on the left bank of the Charles Eiver, on the estate of Mr. 
E. G. Pond, a former member of Troop A. The camping place 
was reached at 1 o'clock p.m., the distance covered being 12 
miles, making the rate of march, including halts, 3 miles per hour. 
Camp equipage was delivered from the State arsenal direct to the 
camping place, the tentage consisting of wall tents for officers and 
shelter tents for enlisted men. Horses were picketed in a small 
grove, and the camp pitched on a gentle slope extending to the 
river, the kitchens being located on the bank. The river water 
was suitable for cooking purposes and watering the horses, but 
spring water was used for drinking. Commissary supplies and 
forage were purchased in Needham. During the evening, instruc- 
tion in outpost duty was given by the establishment of posts 
intended to completely cover the approaches to the camp from ail 
directions, and an inspection was made of the line to test its 
efficiency before being withdrawn. Saturday, at 9 o'clock a.m.,. 
the command broke camp, crossed the Charles Eiver and followed 
its right bank to South Natick, and thence to Natick and Fram- 
ingham, arriving at the State camp ground^ at 12.10 p.m. The 
distance covered was 12 miles, and the rate of march 3.26 miles 
per hour. 

The squadron was in camp with the brigade July 21 to 25, 
inclusive. Instead of devoting all of the drill periods to the usual 
routine of troop and squadron drills on the camp parade ground, 
a large part of the time was occupied in reconnoitering the country 
outside the grounds, having in view especially instruction in out- 
post and patrol work, subjects to which heretofore little attention 
has been given. 

On Wednesday evening, July 24, the squadron left camp, and 
was posted, in accordance with a previously arranged plan, to 
cover all approaches to the camp from the bridge over the Sud- 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 247 

bury River to the northward, westerly through Framingham Centre 
and thence southerly to the line of Learned's pond, an arc of 
about 180°. 

A party of six officers and non-commissioned officers of the 
brigade staff had preceded the squadron to a starting-point near 
the Framingham railroad station, and at 9 o'clock p.m. began an 
attempt to reach camp, the time limit being fixed at two hours. 

As will be seen by the accompanying map, all of the party were 
captured before reaching the vicinity of camp. One man only was 
mounted. He was captured when about to ford the river, and at 
his urgent request was given another chance, but was again taken 
at the next line of posts. 

The conditions were rather severe on the invading party, as, it 
being impracticable for the cavalry to trespass on private property 
to any extent, the former were obliged also to hold to roads and 
well-marked paths. The results of the work, however, were very 
valuable to the officers and men of the squadron, all of whom took 
great interest in it. 

The command left camp at 11 o'clock a.m. Friday morning, July 
26, and marched to Boston by way of the Worcester turnpike, 
through Felchville, Wellesley Hills, Newton Upper Falls and 
Highlands, and Brookline, a distance of 17^ miles, at the rate of 4 
miles per hour, not including a long halt for lunch and feeding the 
horses in Wellesley. 

Accompanying this report is a road map, made by Corporal 
H. K. Barrows of Troop A, of the route covered marching to camp. 
There are a few slight differences between the route shown on this 
map for the second day and the line followed by the squadron, 
owing to changes made after leaving the camp at Needham, Cor- 
poral Barrows having already preceded the column some distance. 

The percentage of attendance in the squadron was very satisfac- 
tory, averaging 91 per cent, for the whole time. Every officer and 
non-commissioned officer was present for duty. A copy of the 
battalion General Order (No. 9) for the tour of duty is enclosed. 

I have the honor to make the following recommendations : — 

That the cavalry be allowed to perform its annual tour of duty 
apart from the infantry. The necessity for conforming in camp to 
the hours established for the infantry, when the work and routine 
required are ve,ry different in character, hampers the mounted 
branches and prevents them from accomplishing the best work 
possible, while overworking the men. 

That the entire tour of duty be performed in marching and 
bivouacs, at the discretion of the commanding officer. Experience 
of the past two years has shown that much more practical and 



248 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 

beneficial work can be accomplished in that way than by spending 
the whole time at the State camp ground. 

That a four-horse wagon be allowed for each troop and head- 
quarters while on the march. It has been proved that two horses 
are not enough to haul the necessary forage, commissary and quar- 
termaster stores needed for a troop at the same rate of speed as 
that made by cavalry ordinarily. 

That canvas horse covers (similar to those used in the United 
States Army) be issued, to protect horses when obliged to stand 
out of doors. This would remove objections made by owners of 
horses to letting their animals for such work. 

That sabres and bits be renickeled. In their present condition, 
it is next to impossible to keep them presentable. 

That new saddles be issued, those now in use being of inferior 
character, entailing considerable expense upon the troops for 
repairs. 

That saddle bags be issued. It is very difficult and inconvenient 
for the men to carry their personal baggage without saddle bags, 
which are considered necessary articles of equipment in the regular 
armv. 

Very respectfully, 

William A. Perkins, 

Major. 

Note. — The following-mentioned enclosures accompany the report 
of Major Perrins : (a) map of route of march (blue print) ; (b) map of 
outpost duty (blue print) ; (c) road map, Boston to South Framingham 
(in three parts); (d) battalion General Orders, No. 9, — all of which 
reflect great credit on this command. 



Headquarters Naval Brigade, M. V. M., 
Fall River, Mass., Nov. 20, 1901. 

The Adjutant General of Massachusetts. 

Sir : — I have the honor to forward herewith my report of camp 
of instruction of this command at Camp Weeks, Fort Rodman, 
New Bedford harbor, Mass., August 17 to 24, inclusive, under 
paragraph I, General Orders, No. 8, current series, of your office. 

Permission having been obtained from the Honorable Secretary 
of War, details from the different companies reported on August 
16 to pitch camp, the work of these details being superintended by 
Lieut. H. C. Talbot, equipment officer. On the day before (Au- 
gust 15) Lieut. Com. William B. Edgar, with a detail from the 
engineer division and also from companies 1 and F to man the 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 249 

** Inca," left Fall River on the morning of that date, and anchored 
off Clark's Point about noon, having towed around from Fall River 
the cutters assigned to companies I and F. The details from the 
several companies pitched camp and distributed the equipage prop- 
erly and in a very expeditious manner, and, while these details 
consisted of only one petty officer and four men from each com- 
pany, all this work was completed by nightfall. By noon of Satur- 
day, August 17, all the companies had reported, with the exception 
of Company H of Springfield, which arrived about 2 o'clock. 

Guard mount was the first duty performed, and was done in a 
very ragged manner ; but a constant improvement was noted dur- 
ing the tour, and the last days of the camp the ceremony was very 
nearly perfect. The companies were ordered out immediately 
after guard mount to police the camp. Dress parade followed. 
Schedule annexed herewith shows the duty performed, which was 
carried out in every detail : — 



250 



ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOET. 



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1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 251 

Target practice was had from the shore at a range of 1,900 
yards, with the one-pounders service charges, and each company 
fired in addition several hundred rounds .45 cal. in sub-calibre 
practice. Target practice was excellent in every company. As 
noted in the schedule of drills, each company, with the exception 
of companies I and F, performed part of the tour on the U. S. S. 
" Inca," that ship being the only vessel at our disposal. The 
work on the " Inca " was performed under the supervision of the 
commanding officer, Lieut. Com. William B. Edgar, and consisted 
of getting under way, going to quarters, heaving the lead, fire 
quarters, man overboard drill, coming to anchor, manning the 
boats and instructing the men at the wheel, etc., and was generally 
very well done. Engineer officer, Lieut. T. R. Armstrong, had 
charge of the engine room with the engineer force of the brigade 
during the entire tour, and he is to be commended for the excellent 
work of his division. 

The Signal Corps of the Naval Brigade, lately organized in Fall 
River, and commanded by signal officer Lieut. (J. G.) J. Bion 
Richards, provided communication night and day from headquar- 
ters to the " Inca" (three stations), and proved themselves to be 
in every way efficient, the full enrollment being present for the 
whole tour. 

Boat races were held in each battalion, and the winners of the 
battalion boat races competed for a cup presented by Capt. John 
W. Weeks, retired. 

The staff of the Naval Brigade offered prizes for swimming over 
a hundred-yard course, also a prize for the fastest swimmer in the 
brigade. The result of the boat races and swimming was that the 
men, in addition to their regular duties of drill and standing guard, 
utilized all their spare time either in the boats or in the water ; and 
every officer and man was benefited as regards his physical condi- 
tion and as to his efficiency as a part of a marine organization 
from the eight days' tour. 

Camp was exceedingly quiet, taps being observed in a remark- 
able manner, and emphasized the fact that the Naval Brigade 
maintains the same condition that has existed since its formation, 
— that is, of being able to perform shore duty in addition to duty 
afloat, and to police and guard its lines in a very satisfactory 
manner. 

The attendance on this tour of duty was the best in the history 
of the organization, and officers and men showed themselves to be 
attentive to their work, and anxious to perform even in the slightest 
detail their whole duty. 

The staff, while almost entirely strangers to their duties in camp 



252 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 

at the outset, proved themselves to be entirely efficient soon after 
the opening of the tour, and in a great measure to them is due the 
success of this camp. It is to be regretted that the Navy Depart- 
ment did not furnish a ship or ships for the tour of duty of the 
Naval Brigade this year, and, as the naval militia, in the absence 
of a naval reserve and even with a national naval reserve, will 
always be a reserve for the navy, it is hoped that future tours will 
be generally done on board ship, on a United States man-of-war or 
in connection therewith. 

Camp was broken promptly at the time specified Saturday morn- 
ing, and a short parade made in the city of New Bedford, passing in 
review before the acting mayor, and the command was dismissed 
at the depot. 

This command is greatly indebted to Mayor Ashley, the city 
departments and the citizens of New Bedford for the many services 
rendered, which helped to make our tour of duty a success. 

I cannot close this report without expressing to you the obliga- 
tion of every officer and man in this organization for the ever- 
ready assistance and support given by your department and 
yourself. 

Very respectfully, 

GrEO. R. H. BUFFINTON, 

Captain, Chief of Brigade. 



Headquarters First Corps of Cadets, M. V. M., 
Boston, July 23, 1901. 

Maj. Gen. Samuel Dalton, Adjutant General, State of Massachusetts. 

General : — I have the honor to report that my command, in 
obedience to orders from its own headquarters, went into camp at 
Hingham on Friday afternoon, July 12, and commenced its tour 
of duty under orders from A. G. O., with the day of annual drill, 
July 13. 

The tour of camp duty commenced on Sunday, July 14, and 
ended Saturday, July 20, upon which latter day the corps returned 
to its armory in Boston, arriving at 12.15 o'clock p.m. 

On Wednesday, July 17, His Honor the Lieutenant Governor, 
accompanied by the Adjutant General and the other general offi- 
cers on the staff of the Commander-in-Chief, visited camp and 
reviewed the corps. Brig. Gen. W. H. Brigham, Inspector General, 
gave the corps much pleasure in visiting it on Saturday, July 13, 
and remaining until Monday, the 15th. It was a matter of great 
regret that the Adjutant General, although he visited the camp on 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 253 

three occasions, was unable, owing to his official duties elsewhere, 
to remain with the corps during any night of its tour. 

The report of the surgeon, which is herewith enclosed, shows 
the weather conditions which prevailed during the camp. Three 
battalion drills were omitted on account of intense heat ; other- 
wise,, the routine as laid down in the standing orders for the corps 
was fully performed, including the building (on Saturday, July 13) 
and dismantling (on Friday, July 19) of a pontoon bridge across 
Broad Cove, in the rear of the camp. 

In addition to the regular routine, all the companies in the corps, 
except Company B , performed a night of out-post duty in bivouac on 
Otis Hill, under substantially the same orders for each ; and each 
captain made a report of the tour, with which he enclosed a sketch 
map of the country where his company had been posted. Owing 
to severe rain on Thursday night, July 18, Company B did not 
perform its tour of out-post duty ; but this company was of great 
assistance otherwise in saving the pontoon bridge from destruction 
during the very severe storm, in which the wind struck the bridge 
with great force. 

During the past winter the officers of the corps had been directed 
to study elementary map drawing and reconnoisance, so that the 
maps which they sent in with the reports of their out-post duty 
were very creditable to them. 

The attendance in this camp shows the highest percentage the 
corps has ever attained. A table showing what it was is appended. 
Company B had every man present but one during five days of the 
tour, and 100 per cent, of attendance during three days. On the 
whole, I consider this tour as being an improvement upon any that 
preceded it. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Thomas F. Edmands, 
Lieutenant Colonel Commanding. 



254 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



Record of Attendance, First Corps Cadets, in Camp at Hingham, July 

12-20,1901. 





Present. 




Absent. 




Present 




<1 


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DUTY. 


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WITHOUT 

LEAVE. 


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July 12, 


18 


184 I 


- 


- 


202 


2 


17 


- 


- 


19 


20 


201 


221 


91.40 


13, 


18 


185 


- 


- 


203 


2 


16 


- 


- 


18 


20 


201 


221 


91.85 


14, 


19 


190 


- 


- 


209 




11 


- 


- 


12 


20 


201 


221 


94.57 


15, 


19 


191 


- 


- 


210 


1 


10 


- 


- 


11 


20 


201 


221 


95.02 


16, 


19 


192 


- 


' - 


211 




9 


- 


- 


10 


20 


201 


221 


95.47 


17, 


19 


193 


- 


- 


212 




8 


- 


- 


9 


20 


201 


221 


95.93 


18, 


19 


193 


- 


- 


212 




8 


- 


- 


9 


20 


201 


221 


95.93 


19, 


19 


193 


- 


- 


212 




8 


- 


- 


9 


20 


201 


221 


95.93 


20, 


19 


190 


- 


- 


209 




11 


- 


- 


12 


20 


201 


221 


94.57 


Average, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


208.88 


















94.52 



N.B. — These figures do not include band of twenty-four pieces. 

Thomas F. Edmands, 

Lieutenant Colonel Commanding. 



Headquarters Second Corps Cadets, M. V. M., 
Salem, Dec. 7, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Samuel Dalton, Adjutant General, Massachusetts. 

General : — I have the honor to report that, in compliance with 
General Orders, A. G. O., No. 8, April 30, 1901, my command 
went into camp at East Boxford, Mass., on Saturday, Aug. 17, 
1901, and returned Saturday, Aug. 24, 1901. 

The annual drill was held on Aug. 17, 1901. The regular 
routine in accordance with standing orders was carried out, with- 
out any interruption, during the entire tour of duty. The weather 
was exceptionally fine ; there were only two showers, and these 
occurred during the night. 

The drills and ceremonies were faithfully performed. The dis- 
cipline was fair and military courtesy good. The men practised at 
the range every day, with good results. On Sunday Rev. E. L. 
Bradford of Boxford conducted the church service. 

We were under no expense this year in camping, as our grounds 
are at present complete for the use of at least a regiment. The 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 255 

Eighth Regiment used part of our grounds for their camp this 
year, and were much pleased with the conditions and surround- 
ings. 

On Saturday, August 17, companies A and B went out on a 
practice march and bivouac, returning the next morning. On 
August 19, companies C and D went out on a similar duty, re- 
turning the following morning. Opportunities were offered for 
exemplification of advance and rear guards, and the commands 
provided their own supper and breakfast. Use was made of the 
shelter tents, and, while it rained during both marches, there was 
no sickness or injurious results. 

There was no sickness during camp ; the report of the surgeon 
is herewith transmitted. The rationing of the troops was very sat- 
isfactory. On Wednesday, August 21, His Honor Lieutenant 
Governor Bates visited the camp and reviewed the corps. 

Gen. W. H. Brigham was present during this tour of duty, and 
carefully observed everything which took place. 

In addition to this camp duty, the corps paraded as escort to 
G. A. R. Post No. 34, on Memorial Day. 

Very respectfully, 

Walter F. Peck, 

Lieutenant Colonel. 



Battery A, Light Artillery, Second Brigade, M. V. M., 
Boston, Oct. 15, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. Samuel Dalton, Adjutant General, State of Massachusetts. 

Sir : — I have the honor to report on the annual tour of duty of 
Light Battery A, in accordance with General Orders, No. 8, A. 
G. O., as amended in Special Orders, No. 47, A. G. O. 

On Saturday, July 13, assembly sounded at the armory at 7 a.m. 
Blue flannel shirts, with khaki trousers and leggings, were worn ; 
and each man had a knapsack, which contained campaign blouse, 
extra blue flannel shirt, two sets of underclothes and extra pair of 
shoes. Overcoat, blanket and rubber ponchos were the only bag- 
gage taken. 

At 8.40 a.m. the command started for the South Boston freight 
yard, where it arrived at 9.15 a.m.; by 10. 30, sixty horses, four 
guns, four caissons, one battery wagon and forge and two artillery 
wagons were loaded on the special train, consisting of two passen- 
ger, four flat and four horse cars. Coffee and sandwiches were 
issued on the train, which arrived at Sandwich at 1.45 p.m. A 
ramp was immediately built, and by 3.15 the command started on 
the five-mile march for the camping ground at Sagamore, where it 
arrived at 5 p.m. At 6.15 tents were pitched, horses picketed, 



256 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

sinks dug, and, with mess call at 7.15 and tattoo at 9.30, the first 
day's duty was completed. 

On Sunday, inspection of quarters and guard mount took place 
in the morning and church services were held in the afternoon, the 
services being conducted by Rev. William Dewart. Monday morn- 
ing the regular hours of duty were established, guard mount, polic- 
ing camp, inspection of quarters, drills and stable duty. 

The surrounding rolling country of over 300 acres afforded a 
most excellent opportunity for drilling across country and of 
coming into action in different positions, and opening fire upon 
four targets erected 75 yards apart at a range varying from 1,300 
to 1,800 yards ; firing was done by section, platoon and battery, 
the result being very satisfactory, and showed the result of the 
experience gained by the non-commissioned officers at the target 
practice held on the Cape last fall. 

A squad of eight men built a bridge from lumber cut in the 
woods of sufficient strength and size to convey across a creek a 
gun and caisson, the only tools used being axes. On Saturday, 
July 20, alarm call was sounded at 2.45 a.m. to break camp, and 
by 3 a.m. the battery was ready to start for Sandwich to entrain 
for Boston, where it arrived at 10.30 a.m. 

The commissary department was most satisfactory, the food 
being simple, but good and of a sufficient amount ; and, together 
with salt water bathing and ample amount of sleep, accounts for 
the excellent health of the command during the week. 

I feel convinced that the practical experience gained by such a 
tour of duty is most beneficial to the command, and makes its 
services more valuable and efficient. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Samuel D. Parker, 

Commanding Light Battery A. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 257 



GENERAL ORDERS AND CIRCULARS. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Jan. 4, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 1. 

Whole number series of 1900, 19. 

I. The following is published for the militia : — 

Before a regimental court marshal, convened pursuant to Special 
Orders, No. 78, headquarters Second Brigade, M. V. M., dated 
July 25, 1900, of which Maj. Harry P. Ballard, Fifth Regiment 
Infantry, M. V. M., was detailed to preside, and which convened 
at Waltham on Monday, Nov. 19, 1900, was arraigned and tried : — 
. Private Felix J. Geffrion, Company F, Fifth Regiment Infantry, 
M. V, M. 

Charge 1. — Drunkenness on duty. 

Specification 1. — In this, that Felix J. Geffrion, private, Com- 
pany F, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., having been duly 
ordered for duty at the annual drill of the Fifth Regiment Infantry, 
M. V. M., and having entered upon said duty, was found drunk 
thereon. This at Maiden, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
on or about the tenth day of October, A.D. 1900. 

Charge 2. — Disrespect to his superior officer. 

Specification 2. — In that Felix J. Geffrion, private, Company 
F, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., did behave with disrespect 
toward his superior officer, to wit, Capt. Clifford E. Hamilton r 
Company F, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., by saying to him, 
u You are no good, you never was any good, and you cannot put 
me out of this armory." This in the presence of other officers and 
soldiers of Company F, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. This 
at Waltham, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, on or about 
the tenth day of October, A.D. 1900. 

The accused pleaded to the specification of the first charge, Not 
Guilty ; to the charge, Not Guilty. 

To the second charge and its specification the accused, through 
his attorney, entered a demurrer, which being overruled, the court 
proceeded to the trial under the second charge and specification, to 
which the accused pleaded as follows : — 



258 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 

To the specification of the second charge, Not Guilty ; to the 
charge, Not Guilty. 

The findings of the court are as follows : — 

To the specification of the first charge, . . Not guilty. 

To the charge, Not guilty. 

To the specification of the second charge, . . Guilty. 

To the charge, Guilty. 

The court therefore sentenced him, the said Felix J. Geffrion, 
Company F, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., to be dishonor- 
ably discharged from the militia of the Commonwealth. 

The proceedings and findings of the court having been reviewed 
by the Judge Advocate General and submitted to the Commander- 
in-Chief, his orders are as follows : — 

Executive Department, Boston, Dec. 31, 1900. 

The sentence in the foregoing case of Private Felix J. Geffrion, Com- 
pany F, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., is confirmed, and is, in view 
of his previous service and conduct, commuted to discharge from the 
military service of the Commonwealth. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor. 

II. Private Felix J. Geffrion is hereby discharged from the 
military service of the Commonwealth. 

III. William F. Young, second lieutenant, Company D, Eighth 
Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., is retired from active service, to 
date Dec. 26, 1900, on account surgeon's certificate of disability. 

IV. Brig. Gen. William A. Bancroft, Second Brigade, M. V. M., 
having rendered continuous service in commission for upwards of 
twenty-three years, is, on his own request, placed upon the list of 
retired officers, with the rank of major general, as provided by law. 

V. Col. Wm. A. Pew, Jr., Eighth Regiment Infantry, will at 
once assume the command of the Second Brigade, M. V. M. 

VI. General Bancroft will continue to serve as president of the 
Military Examining Board until further orders. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Jan. 19, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 2. 

I. Brig. Gen. James L. Carter, Inspector General, will cause 
the inspection of the several companies of the Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Militia in their armories between Feb. 1 and May 1, 1901. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 259 

II. The personnel and administration of brigade, regimental, 
battalion and cadet corps headquarters, including drum corps, will 
be inspected between the above-stated dates. 

III. The following instructions of the Inspector General govern- 
ing the inspection herein ordered are approved and published for 
the information of all concerned : — 

(a) Inspections will be held on regular drill nights, as far as 
practicable. 

(6) Inspecting officers will give exactly sixteen days' notice of 
intended visit, by letter to company commanders. 

(c) Regimental, naval brigade, artillery, cavalry and cadet corps 
commanders will be notified of inspectors' intentions at the same 
time as company commanders. 

(d) Organizations will be paraded at inspection under arms, and 
uniformed and equipped as follows : — 

Uniform cap, blouse, trousers, leggings. The haversack (with 
mess-kit, but without tin cup) and the canteen will be carried. 
White gloves will not be worn. 

Officers will be equipped with haversack and canteen, in addition 
to side arms. 

Overcoats, canvas suits, campaign hats and tin cups will be 
spread out in a convenient place for examination. 

(e) Company commanders will submit company roll books repre- 
senting the roll of their companies on the date of inspection. 

(/) All reports of inspections will be forwarded to the Inspector 
General within ten days after the completion of the tour of duty. 

(g) Special reports of any deficiencies in personnel, whether 
officers or enlisted men, or in material, which need immediate 
remedy, will be made on the day following inspection. 

IV. Officers are reminded that reports and returns required by 
law will be forwarded within the time limit stated by law, and not 
delayed, as has been the custom of some officers. 

V. A condemning board will meet at the arsenal, South Fram- 
ingham, on January 30, at 11 o'clock a.m., to examine and report 
upon worn-out and obsolete United States and State property. 
The board will report in triplicate their action, and forward return 
of attendance. Detait for the board : Brig. Gen. James L. Carter, 
Inspector General ; Maj. Isaac N. Marshall, Sixth Infantry ; Capt. 
John F. Kenealy, Company L, Ninth Regiment Infantry. 

VI. Money allowances for responsibility of property for the 
year ending March 1, 1901, will be made up on that date. All 
officers responsible for property will report by letter not later than 
March 1, or before Feb. 25, 1901, whether or not all the property 



260 ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S REPOBT. [Jan. 

for which they are responsible is on hand, as reported on property 
return, December, 1900. Allowances will not be made until such 
letters are received. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant Genekal's Office, Boston, Feb. 9, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 3. 

I. The following is published for the information of the 
militia : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Department, Boston, Feb. 7, 1901. 

In consideration of the reports and recommendation of the Inspector 
General and Col. Embury P. Clark, commanding Second Regiment of 
Infantry, it appears that Company F, Second Regiment of Infantry, has 
fallen below the standard of efficiency. Let an order be issued disband- 
ing said company, and arrangements made at once for the proper care 
of United States and State property of this command. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chvf. 

II. Company F, Second Regiment Infantry, First Brigade, 
M. V. M., is hereby disbanded. Col. Embury P. Clark, command- 
ing Second Regiment of Infantry, will at once make arrangements 
for the proper care of United States and State property, detailing 
an officer to receipt for the property and forward the same to the 
State arsenal by freight, immediately forwarding the report of 
duty, with mileage and pay claimed, and also list of property 
receipted for. 

III. Honorable discharges for officers and enlisted men will be 
issued from this office. 

IV. Authorized State military organizations of other States 
have permission to enter the Commonwealth, armed and equipped, 
between March 1 and March 10, 1901, for the purpose of visiting 
Washington to attend the inauguration of the President of the 
United States. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 261 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Feb. 21, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 4. 

I. Before a regimental court martial, pursuant to authority from 
headquarters First Brigade, by Special Orders, No. 38, dated July 
12, 1900, and Special Orders, No. 52, headquarters First Heavy 
Artillery, dated Dec. 29, 1900, of which Lieut. Col. Charles B. 
Woodman, First Heavy Artillery, was detailed to preside, which 
convened at the South Armory in Boston, Jan. 7, 1901, was ar- 
raigned and tried : — 

Private Frank A. Donovan, Battery K, First Regiment Heavy 
Artillery, M. V. M. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders, in violation of the regulations 
for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, and 
violation of the provisions of the Acts of 1893, chapter 367. 

Specification. — In that Private Frank A. Donovan, Battery K, 
First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., having received a 
lawful command from his captain, Frederic S. Howes, through 
the chief of his squad, Sergf. William C. Atton, to attend the drills 
of his battery, did wilfully disobey said command. This at South 
Armory, Boston, on several occasions since the camp of 1900. 

The defendant not appearing, the trial proceeded as if he were 
present and had pleaded Not Guilty. 

Finding. — The court finds Private Frank A. Donovan, Battery 
K, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., Guilty. 

Sentence. — The court sentences Private Frank A. Donovan, 
Battery K, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V". M., to be dis- 
honorably discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

II. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the case of Private Frank A. Donovan, Battery K, First 
Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to be regular, and the sen- 
tence adequate, and the same having been submitted to the Com- 
mander-in-Chief, the following are his orders : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, Boston, Feb. 21, 1901. 

The sentence of the court in the case of Private Frank A. Donovan, 
Battery K, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, is approved, and will be 
carried into effect. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor. 



262 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 

III. Private Frank A. Donovan, Battery K, First Regiment 
Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., is therefore dishonorably discharged 
from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, in accordance with the 
sentence of the court. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, March 9, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 5. 

The following rules and regulations for the government of rifle, 
carbine and revolver practice and competitions for the year 1901, 
having been prepared by Col. William H. Brigham, I. G. R. P., 
are approved and published for the information of the militia : — 

I. The shooting season will close October 31,* and the annual 
returns for range work must be forwarded to the Inspector General 
of Rifle Practice (Room 108, State House) in time to reach him 
on or before Saturday, November 9. No allowance of extra time 
in which to make these returns will be granted. 

II. General Provisions. — Detachments of enlisted men 
shooting for qualification will as far as practicable be sent to range 
in undress uniform or canvas fatigue dress, under an officer or 
non-commissioned officer, who will be held responsible for the dis- 
cipline and proper use and care of arms and ammunition. The 
rifles should be loaded at firing point only, and should be inspected 
before leaving the range. The officer or non-commissioned officer 
in charge of the detachment must certify on honor in writing as to 
the correctness of scores. The arms used in practice and compe- 
tition will be those issued or adopted by the State, without altera- 
tion, except that the blades of the front sights of rifles may be 
made thicker or higher, to allow for difference of eyesight or error 
in elevation. 

Minimum trigger pull of rifles and carbines will be 6 pounds, and 
of revolver, 4 pounds. The Smith & Wesson calibre .38 military 
revolver (6 or 6 J inch barrel) is hereby adopted on an equality 
with the Colt calibre .38 army revolver as an official arm, and 
either can be used in qualifying or in competition. 

Either the United States Army elliptical or the Creedmoor tar- 
get may be used in making qualifications, but the United States 
Army target must be used in competitions. 

* See amendment, General Orders, No. 20. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 263 

The prescribed scores for qualification are as follows : — 





Class. 


200 Yards. 


500 Yards. 600 Yards. 


Sharpshooter, .... 
Third, 


Two scores of 22. 
Two scores of 21. 
Two scores of 18. 
Two scores of 15. 


Two scores of 23. 
Two scores of 21. 


Two scores of 21. 



Scores will consist of 5 consecutive shots, with a possible total of 
25 points. Position at 200 yards, standing, off hand ; at 500 yards, 
prone ; at 600 yards, any position. 

Enlisted men not qualifying in some class within one year of the 
date of their enlistment will be discharged, for the best interests of 
the service. 

Commanding officers are reminded of the order forbidding the 
appointing of non-commissioned officers who have failed to qualify 
as marksmen. 

The following members of the militia are entitled to qualify with 
the revolver, and will receive decorations under the rules : — 

All officers, non-commissioned staff officers, color sergeants and 
headquarter orderlies of organizations entitled to them by law, en- 
listed men of the cavalry and light artillery, and pett}^ officers of 
the Naval Brigade. 

Distinguished marksmen are sharpshooters on whom the honorary 
distinction has been conferred for marked ability, and marksmen 
of this grade will conform to the requirements of the sharpshooter 
class. 

Badges will be given for qualifications and bars for requalifica- 
tions. Not more than six badges for rifle shooting and one for 
revolver shooting can be worn on State duty. 

Badges and medals are the property of the officers and men win- 
ning them, over which the State exercises no control, except as 
specified above. 

Efficiency trophies will not be given, as no plan of awarding 
such trophies on a basis equitable to the different branches of the 
service seems practicable. 

In computing the figure of merit of the company, four points 
will be allowed for each first class qualification or requalification 
with the revolver, and three points for a second class. The same 
allowance will be given for qualifications made by officers and 
enlisted men at headquarters, but not for enlisted men of the 
cavalry, light artillery, or of divisions of the Naval Brigade. 



264: ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

Requalification will in all cases mean requalifying in " the highest 
class previously attained." Marksmen of record, failing to re- 
qualify in accordance with the above rule or to qualify in a higher 
class, will be returned as "marksmen of record who have failed 
to requalify." 

Points allowed in computing the " figure of merit" will be reck- 
oned on the basis of qualifications and of requalifications made in 
accordance with the above rule. No points will be allowed for 
"requalifications in lower classes," as heretofore. 

Money allowances will be computed on the same basis. 

The number of points allowed for each qualification will be as 
established by General Orders, No. 4, series of 1900, with the 
above exceptions. 

Annual returns of rifle practice will be sent from regimental or 
battalion headquarters to the Inspector General of Rifle Practice 
direct. 

Money Allowances. — Allowances of $2.50 will be made for each 
sharpshooter qualification or requalification, $2 for each first 
class, $1.50 for each second class and $1 for each third class. 
There will also be allowed $1 for each first class and 50 cents for 
each second class revolver qualification or requalification. 

Money allowances will be made for headquarter qualifications 
the same as for those of companies, but no allowance for ammuni- 
tion will be granted, as in the past. Claims for money allowance 
will be made, on the annual return of the company, for those 
members only that remain in the company at the end of the shoot- 
ing season. 

Regimental and corps competition will be held in September 
or October, at the discretion of the commanding officers. The 
State general rifle competition will be held at Walnut Hill, on 
Thursday, September 26 ; the State carbine competition at Walnut 
Hill, on Thursday, October 3. 

Teams for the State general rifle competition will consist of 
fifteen officers or men, with two substitutes. 

Scores, 10 shots each at 200 and 500 yards, with 1 sighting shot 
at each distance. 

Team entries will be made on blanks furnished by the depart- 
ment and sent to the Inspector General of Rifle Practice on or 
before September 20. 

Prizes to the winning team, the tri-color, carrying with it the 
rifle team firing championship for the year, together with a trophy 
for the headquarters of the command ; to the second team, a trophy 
for the headquarters of the command ; for the fifteen ranking scores 
made by sharpshooters who never have won a State prize, each an 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 265 

individual trophy ; to the fifteen ranking scores made by competi- 
tors without regard to class, each an individual trophy, together 
with "mention in orders." 

Regimental Competition. — Regimental competition will be held 
on the range selected by the commanding officer as most convenient 
and suitable. 

Teams of 15 officers or men and 1 substitute, 15 shots each, with 
1 sighting shot at 200 yards. 

Prize. — A trophy to the winning team in each organization. 

Cavalry Competition. — Teams of 10 officers or men, with 2 
substitutes, 10 shots each at 200 and 500 yards, with 1 sighting 
shot. 

Prizes to the winning team, the guidon trophy, carrying with it 
the carbine team firing championship for the year, together with a 
trophy to become the property of the winning troop ; to the two 
ranking scores made by sharpshooters who have never won a State 
prize, each an individual trophy ; to the two ranking scores made 
by competitors without regard to class, each an individual trophy, 
together with " mention in orders." 

Special duty pay and transportation will be allowed officers and 
men competing in the matches or detailed for duty in connection 
with same. 

Further details will be published in later orders. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, March 12, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 6. 

I. Before regimental courts martial, convened pursuant to 
Special Orders, No. 5, headquarters Naval Brigade, dated Feb. 
12, 1901, and Special Orders, No. 2, headquarters First Brigade, 
M. V. M., dated Feb. 11, 1901, were arraigned and tried : — 

(a) Seaman Aaron Winslow, Jr., Company E, Naval Brigade. 

Charge 1 . — Neglect of duty. 

Specification 1. — In this, that the said Seaman Aaron Winslow, 
Jr., has neglected to attend the regular drills of Company E, Naval 
Brigade, M. V. M., from Oct. 4, 1900, to Feb. 7, 1901, having 
been present at the armory at only one drill during said period, 
and that on Oct. 25, 1901. 

Charge 2. — Disobedience of orders. 

Specification 1. — In this, that the said Seaman Aaron TTinslow, 



2QQ 



ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



Jr., failed to obey special written order to attend drill on Jan. 17, 
1901, which was delivered to him in person by messenger. 

Specification 2. — In this, that the said Seaman Aaron Winslow, 
Jr., failed to obey special written order to attend drill on Jan. 24, 
1901, which was delivered to him in person by messenger. 

Charge 3. — Non-payment of fines and dues. 

/Specification 1. — In that the said Seaman Aaron Winslow, Jr., 
has failed to pay into the company treasury funds and dues to the 
amount of $4.56, charged against him according to the by-laws of 
the said company. 

The accused being duly summoned and failing to appear, the 
trial proceeded as though the accused were present and pleaded Not 
Guilty. 

Finding. — The court, having maturely considered the evidence 
adduced, finds the accused, Seaman Aaron Winslow, Jr., Company 
E, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., as follows : — 



Of the specification, charge 1, . 


Guilty 


Of the first charge, .... 


Guilty 


Of the specifications, charge 2, . 


Guilty 


Of the second charge, 


Guilty 


Of the specification, charge 3, . 


Guilty 


Of the third charge, .... 


Guilty 



Sentence. — The court does therefore sentence him, the said Sea- 
man Aaron Winslow, Jr., Company E, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., 
to be dishonorably discharged from the militia. 

(b) Seaman Eugene H. Johnson, Company E, Naval Brigade, 
M. V. M. 

Charge 1. — Neglect of duty. 

Specification 1. — In that the said Seaman Eugene H. Johnson, 
Company E, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., has neglected to attend the 
regular drills of Company E, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., from Oct. 
25, 1900, to Feb. 7, 1901, having been present at only one drill 
during said period, and that on Nov. 8, 1900. 

Charge 2. — Disobedience of orders. 

Specification 1. — In that said Seaman Eugene H. Johnson failed 
to obey special written order to attend drill on Jan. 17, 1901, which 
was delivered to him in person by messenger. 

Specification 2. — In that the said Seaman Eugene H. Johnson 
failed to obey special written order to attend drill on Jan. 24, 1901, 
which was delivered to him in person by special messenger. 

Charge 3. — Non-payment of fines and dues. 

Specification 1. — In that the said Seaman Eugene H. Johnson 
has failed to pay into the company treasury funds and dues to the 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 267 

amount of $9.63, charged against him according to the by-laws of 
said company. 

Finding. — The court, having maturely considered the evidence 
adduced, finds the accused, Seaman Eugene H. Johnson, Company 
E, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., as follows : — 

Of specification 1, charge 1, Guilty. 

Of charge 1, . . . . . . . Guilty. 

Of specification 1, charge 2, Guilty. 

Of specification 2, charge 2, Guilty. 

Of specification 1, charge 3, Guilty. 

Of charge 3, . . . . . . . Guilty. 

Sentence. — And the court does therefore sentence him, the said 
Seaman Eugene H. Johnson, Company E, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., 
to be dishonorably discharged from the militia. 

(c) Private Frank Henry Brennan, Company I, Sixth Eegiment 
Infantry, First Brigade, M. V. M. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders. 

Specification 1. — In that the said Private Frank Henry Brennan, 
Company I, Sixth Eegiment Infantry, has neglected to attend all 
drills of the company since Oct. 9, 1900. 

Specification 2. — In that Private Frank Henry Brennan did 
wilfully absent himself from inspection of Jan. 8, 1901, in dis- 
obedience of Company Orders, No. 13, dated at Concord, Dec. 27, 
1900. 

To which the accused pleads as follows : — 

To the charge, Guilty. 

To specification 1, Guilty. 

To specification 2, Guilty. 

Finding. — The court, having maturely considered the evidence 
adduced, finds the accused, Private Frank Henry Brennan, Com- 
pany I, Sixth Regiment Infantry, Guilty of the specifications and 
charge. 

Sentence. — And the court does therefore sentence him, the said 
Private Frank Henry Brennan, Company I, Sixth Regiment In- 
fantry, to be dishonorably discharged from the volunteer militia 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

II. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the cases of Seamen Aaron Winslow, Jr., and Eugene H. 
Johnson, Company E, Naval Brigade, and Private Frank Henry 
Brennan, Company I, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., to 
have been regular and the sentences adequate, and the same hav- 
ing been submitted to the Commander-in-Chief, his orders are as 
follows : — 



268 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Department, Boston, March 12, 1901. 

The sentences of the courts in the cases of Seamen Aaron Winslow, 
Jr., and Eugene H. Johnson, Company E, Naval Brigade, and Private 
Frank Henry Brennan, Company I, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., 
are approved, and will be carried into effect. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

III. Seamen Aaron Winslow, Jr., and Eugene H. Johnson of 
Company E, Naval Brigade, and Private Frank Henry Brennan, 
Company I, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., are hereby dis- 
honorably discharged from the militia of the Commonwealth. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, March 27, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 7. 

I. Before a regimental court martial, convened pursuant to 
authority from headquarters Naval Brigade, M. V. M., by Special 
Orders, No. 7, dated March 6, 1901, of which Lieut. Com. William 
B. Edgar was detailed to preside, and which convened in New 
Bedford, March 9, 1901, was arraigned and tried : — 

Seaman Clifford Howland, Company G-, Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 

Charge 1. — Disobedience of orders. 

Specification 1. — In .this, that Seaman Clifford Howland did 
wilfully disobey the special orders of his company commander, to 
be present at the drill of Feb. 11, 1901. This at New Bedford, 
Feb. 11, 1901. 

Specification 2. — In this, that Seaman Clifford Howland did 
wilfully disobey the special orders of his company commander, to 
be present at the drill of Feb. 25, 1901. This at New Bedford ,. 
Feb. 25, 1901. 

Charge 2. — Neglect of duty, to the prejudice of good order 
and military discipline. 

Specification 1. — In this, that Seaman Clifford Howland has 
repeatedly neglected to attend the regular drills of his company, 
without offering excuse for non-attendance. This at New Bedford, 
Dec. 17, 1900, to Feb. 25, 1901. 

The accused appeared and pleaded Guilty to both charges. 

Finding. — The court finds Seaman Clifford Howland, Company 
G, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., Guilty of both charges and specifi- 
cations. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JS T o. 7. 269 

Sentence. — The court therefore sentences the said Seaman 
Clifford Howland, Company G, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., to be dis- 
honorably discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

II. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the case of Seaman Clifford Howland, Company G, Naval 
Brigade, M. V. M., to be regular, and the sentence adequate, and 
the same having been submitted to the Commander-in-Chief, the 
following are his orders : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, Boston, March 23, 1901. 

The sentence of the court in the case of Seaman Clifford Howland, 
Company G, Naval Brigade, M. V. M,, is approved, and will be carried 
into effect. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

III. Seaman Clifford Howland, Company G, Naval Brigade, 
M. V. M., is therefore dishonorably discharged from the Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Militia, in accordance with the sentence of the 
court. 

IV. In accordance with Paragraph No. 679, Regulations, 
M. V. M., official communications hereafter will be signed or 
authenticated with the pen, and not by facsimiles, and the use of 
stamped signatures on official papers is prohibited. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, April 30, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 8.* 

I. The troops comprising the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia 
will hold their annual encampments for the year 1901 as follows : — 

First Brigade, Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Mathews, commanding, 
excepting First Regiment of Heavy Artillery, at the State camp 
grounds, South Framingbam, June 22 to 28, inclusive. Annual 
drills of all commands, excepting First Regiment of Heavy Artil- 
lery, will take place at State camp grounds, June 21. 

Second Brigade, Brig. Gen. J. H. Whitney, commanding, ex- 
cepting Eighth Regiment of Infantry and Battery A, Light Artil- 
lery, at the State camp grounds, South Framingham, July 20 to 
26, inclusive. 

First Regiment of Heavy Artillery, First Brigade, Col. James 

* As amended by Special Orders, No. 47. 



270 ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 

F. Frye, commanding, at Fort Rodman, New Bedford, permission 
having been received from the War Department to encamp be- 
tween July 20 and August 20. It is optional with the command- 
ing officer of the regiment to encamp by battalions or regiment. 
If by battalions, he will designate the dates for each battalion, and 
make assignments of regimental headquarters and band. The 
regiment will perform seven days' camp duty between the above 
dates, and pay rolls will be forwarded at conclusion of tour of duty. 
Annual drill may be performed the day previous to encampments. 

Eighth Regiment of Infantry, Second Brigade, Col. Wm. A. 
Pew, Jr., commanding, will perform its camp duty and annual 
drill at Boxford. Camp duty from July 6 to 13, inclusive ; annual 
drill, July 9. 

The Naval Brigade, Capt. G-. R. H. Buffinton, commanding, will 
perform its camp duty and annual drill at Fort Rodman, New Bed- 
ford (if permission is granted by War Department) . Camp duty, 
August 18 to 24, inclusive ; annual drill, August 17. 

Battery A, Light Artillery, Second Brigade, will perform its 
camp duty and annual drill on Cape Cod, by route marches and 
camps, from July 13 to 20, inclusive. 

The commanding officer of the Second Brigade, M. V. M., will 
detail an officer as mustering officer for Battery A. 

First Corps of Cadets at Hingham, July 14 to 20, inclusive. 
The annual drill of this command will take place at Hingham, 
July 13. 

Second Corps of Cadets at Boxford, August 18 to 24, inclusive. 
The annual drill of this command will take place at Boxford, 
August 17. 

II. Capt. Myles Standish, commanding the Ambulance Corps, 
will make two details of his command, with such officers as he may 
deem necessary, for duty with the First and Second Brigades at 
encampments. 

III. Troops will arrive in camp in season to pitch their camps. 

All troops will perform duty under this order in campaign uni- 
form, and strict compliance with bill of dress will be required ; 
working suits and fatigue cap may be worn when so ordered by 
brigade commanders. All baggage will be reduced to the minimum. 

IV. No enlisted man will be returned for pay unless enlisted 
thirty days before the tour of duty, excepting in case of re-enlist- 
ments. 

V. Brigade commanders are hereby ordered to assume control 
of the State camp ground (excepting the arsenal and buildings im- 
mediately adjoining) on the day prior to the encampment of their 
respective commands. Proper details will be made for guarding 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 271 

all property, and the provost guard will guard all buildings, hos- 
pitals aud property the day preceding the camp, and infantry de- 
tails will perform this duty during camp. 

They will detail a provost guard, and from each regiment, 
separate battalion and unattached company (on duty with the 
brigade) the Quartermaster and the Quartermaster Sergeant, for 
duty on the day preceding the opening of the encampment. Troops 
arriving in camp on the day preceding the date of encampment 
will be under orders of the brigade commanders, and enlisted men 
will not leave camp without a pass. Brigade commanders will 
also detail a staff officer to attend to embarking and disembarking 
troops at depots in Boston and South Framingham, on the first and 
seventh days at camp, who shall forward a detailed report of the 
same through channels to this office. 

They will issue stringent orders relative to care of quarters and 
uniform arrangement of the same, and extra and useless baggage 
and boxes will not be allowed in quarters, and brigade orders will 
give the maximum of baggage to be allowed. 

The Judge Advocate of each brigade is hereby ordered during the 
encampments to exercise jurisdiction as provided in the militia laws 
of the Commonwealth. 

VI. Requisitions for quartermasters' supplies will not be re- 
ceived or filed in camp except in cases of special emergency, and 
the practice of delaying requisitions until arrival in camp will be 
discontinued. 

VII. Bills for transportation of horses for headquarters, ap- 
proved by the commanding officer, with accompanying vouchers, 
will be forwarded immediately upon the completion of duty, and 
will be paid through the paymaster. Vouchers must accompany 
each bill for horse transportation, but bills will not be forwarded 
for horses ridden to or from camp by officers ; and where horses 
are delivered on the camp ground in lots the full allowance for 
transportation will not be asked for, but the amount only expended 
for such transportation. 

VIII. The veterinary surgeons of each brigade will thoroughly 
inspect all horses reported for duty, and they are authorized to 
reject horses unfit for service, and order that they shall not be 
returned for allowance on bills or pay rolls. If possible, they will 
inspect the horses for artillery and cavalry prior to their leaving 
their home posts. If it is necessary, in order to accomplish this, 
to have the duty performed the day before camp, the veterinary 
surgeons will perform this duty on those days, and be returned on 
pay rolls for extra duty. 

IX. The horses of officers and enlisted men for which allow- 



272 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

ance is made will not be ridden by civilians under any consideration 
whatever, and all racing and over-driving is strictly prohibited. 

X. Officers of the guard will, as soon as guard is mounted, take 
an inventory of all State property — uniforms, arms, equipments, 
etc. — which each enlisted man of his guard has; and before dis- 
missing his guard, on being relieved by the new guard, will see 
that every man has all property he reported ; and in case of loss 
will at once report it to the Quartermaster General, and will make 
entry on guard book of losses or no loss. Reports of loss of prop- 
erty on guard mean inefficient guard officers. The guard quarters 
and the grounds around the same will be kept clean by the guard 
each day. 

XI. Brigade commanders will make such rules as to passes for 
citizens as they may deem best for the interests of the service, and 
are hereby authorized to designate visiting days, if in their judg- 
ment it is best. 

Passes for enlisted men to leave camp will not be given except in 
urgent cases, a*nd all enlisted men found outside of camp without 
authority will be arrested and at once court-martialed. 

Returns of absentees, which must be properly filled out, with 
recommendations for action in full, — and none will be returned 
without such recommendations, — will be forwarded with pay rolls 
to the Adjutant General. Captains of companies will see that no 
man is recommended for discharge who has not been properly 
notified of the tour of duty. Reports of absentees will be handed 
paymaster on the last day of camp. 

XII. The Inspector General will detail officers of his depart- 
ment to attend the above camps and report on the same. Such 
officers detailed will report at the camp for duty at 10 o'clock a.m. 
first day of camp, to note the arrival of troops, the manner of 
pitching camp and the performance of the routine duty. 

XIII. The Commissary General is hereby authorized to pur- 
chase commissary supplies in accordance with the ration table as 
adopted in General Orders, No. 7, 1899, and to charge the actual 
cost to all organizations drawing rations, to collect from the pay 
the amount charged, and to pay bills for rations purchased. The 
headquarters and company commanders to fill out and forward to 
the regimental and battalion commissary, unattached companies to 
brigade commissary, two weeks before a tour of duty, ration return 
No. 1 ; the regimental commissary to consolidate these returns on 
form No. 2, and forward same to brigade commissary ; the brigade 
commissary to consolidate these returns on Form No. 3, and for- 
ward to Commissary General. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 273 

XIV. The Commissary General will then arrange the issue 
with the brigade commissary. All rations required for will be 
paid for out of the money received for duty performed, and officers 
who have had pay of officers and men assigned to them will assign 
the amount due for rations, through paymasters, to the Commissary 
General, with an addition of ten per cent, over estimated cost ; but 
only the actual cost of rations will be deducted from money re- 
ceived, and the balance returned to the paymaster. 

XV. Companies will furnish their fuel for cooking, but it can 
be furnished by the quartermasters of each command, he collecting 
the cost of the same from commands. 

XVI. The superintendent of the arsenal will issue one cooking 
range for each cook house, one ration hand cart and one ration 
issue chest with tools to commissary of regiments, battalions or 
unattached commands, who will receipt for the same. Commissary 
officers will see that cook houses are turned back clean and that 
ranges and utensils are cleaned. 

XVII. Blank forms for ration requisitions and consolidation 
blanks will be forwarded to each command, and these requisitions, 
with the consolidated return, must be forwarded by brigade com- 
manders two weeks before camp, to admit of purchase of sup- 
plies. 

XVIII. The Commissary General and the commissaries of all 
commands will report for duty at the camps two days before the 
tour of duty, and rations will be issued on arrival of troops in 
camp. 

XIX. Companies owning crockery may be allowed to use the 
same, and the manner of issue of cooked rations to enlisted men 
from the cook houses will be regulated by regimental, battalion 
and unattached commanding officers. 

XX. Paymasters will see that, when a regularly appointed 
company cook performs his duty as cook, it is so stated on the pay 
rolls, and that the duty was performed by the regularly enlisted 
cook. The cook's pay will not be allowed unless so certified on 
rolls. 

XXI. The following-named commissioned officers of the vol- 
unteer militia, having rendered continuous service in commission 
for more than ten years, have, at their own request, been placed 
on the retired list : — 

Lieut. William B. Clarke, Quartermaster, First Corps of Cadets, 
as captain, Feb. 14, 1901. 

Capt. Daniel J. Keefe, Company A, Ninth Infantry, as major, 
Feb. 20, 1901. 



274 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 

Lieut. Col. George H. Benyon, Assistant Adjutant General, 
Second Brigade, as colonel, March 27, 1901. 

Maj. Robert Ball Edes, Assistant Inspector General Rifle 
Practice, Second Brigade, as lieutenant colonel, April 20, 1901. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, 

Adjutant General's Office, Boston, May 23, 1901. 
General Orders, No. 9. 

I. Before a regimental court martial convened pursuant to 
authority from headquarters First Brigade, M. V. M., by Special 
Orders, No. 38, dated July 12, 1900, and Special Orders, No. 12, 
dated headquarters First Regiment Heavy Artillery, April 9, 1901, 
of which Lieut. Col. Charles B. Woodman was detailed to preside, 
was arraigned and tried : — 

Private Bernard Donnelly, Battery A, First Regiment Heavy 
Artillery, M. V. M. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders, in violation of the regulations 
for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

Specifications. — In this, Private Bernard Donnelly, Battery A, 
First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., having received a 
lawful command from his captain, E. Dwight Fullerton to attend 
the annual inspection of his battery, and other drills, did wilfully 
disobey said commands. 

This at South Armory, Boston, on March 20, 1901, and at other 
times before and after that date. 

The accused not appearing, a plea of Not Guilty was entered, 
and the trial proceeded as if he were present and had pleaded Not 
Guilty, as provided in the regulations for the Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Militia. 

Finding. — The court finds Private Bernard Donnelly, Battery 
A, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., Guilty. 

Sentence. — The court therefore sentences the said Private 
Bernard Donnelly, Battery A, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, 
M. V. M., to be dishonorably discharged from the Massachusetts 
Volunteer Militia. 

II. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the case of Private Bernard Donnelly, Battery A, First 
Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to be regular and the sentence 
adequate, and the same having been submitted to the Commander- 
in-Chief, the following are his orders : — 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 275 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, Boston, May 23, 1901. 

The sentence of the court in the case of Private Bernard Donnelly, 

Battery A, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., is approved, and 

will be carried into effect. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

III. Private Bernard Donnelly, Battery A, First Regiment 
Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., is dishonorably discharged from the 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia by sentence of court martial. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, May 25, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 10. 

I. The following is published for the information of the mi- 
litia : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Department, Boston, May 22, 1901. 

Upon consideration of a report and recommendation of the Inspector 
General and the commanding officer of the Ninth Regiment Infantry, 
Second Brigade, it appears that Company D, Ninth Infantry, has fallen 
below the standard of efficiency. Let an order be issued disbanding said 
company, and arrangements made for care of "United States and State 

property. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

II. Company D, Ninth Infantry, Second Brigade, is hereby 
disbanded. Honorable discharges for officers and men will be 
issued from this office. 

III. Col. W. H. Donovan, commanding Ninth Regiment of 
Infantry, will at once detail an officer to receive United States and 
State property, for which the commanding officer of Company D is 
responsible, and forward the same to the State arsenal. 

IV. Paymasters will forward requests for advance of eighty 
per cent, of pay and mileage for ordered tours of camp and annual 
drill, through channels. Whenever the annual drill precedes or 
follows camp, the request will be on one blank, writing " and " in 
place of "or" in the request blank. 

V. Commanding officers of organizations that do not encamp 
upon State camp ground will immediately forward requisitions for 
camp equipage and all necessary supplies. 



276 ADJUTANT GEKEKAL'S REPOKT. [Jan. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Department, Boston, May 24, 1901. 

Col. William H. Brigham of Hudson, Inspector General of Rifle Prac- 
tice, is hereby appointed Inspector General, with the rank of brigadier 
general, from May 24, 1901. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

VI. The above-named officer, having been duly commissioned, 
qualified and assigned to duty, will be obeyed and respected ac- 
cordingly. 

VII. The Inspector General will continue to act as Inspector 
General of Rifle Practice until an officer is appointed to that de- 
partment. 

VIII. The following-named commissioned officers of the vol- 
unteer militia, having rendered continuous service in commission 
for more than ten years, have, at their own request, been placed 
on the retired list, as provided by law : — 

Capt. Ulysses A. Goodell, Company K, Sixth Infantry, as cap- 
tain, May 13, 1901. 

Maj. Charles C. Foster, surgeon, Fifth Infantry, as lieutenant 
colonel, May 14, 1901. 

Capt. Frederic P. Barnes, quartermaster, Second Brigade, as 
major, May 14, 1901. 

Capt. John S. Keenan, quartermaster, First Heavy Artillery, as 
captain, May 14, 1901. 

Brig. Gen. James Lowell Carter, Inspector General, as brigadier 
general, May 17, 1901. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, May 29, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 11. 

I. The following is published for the information of the 

militia : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Department, Boston, May 28, 1901. 

Ordered, That the petition of John Nicholson and others of Pittsfield, 
to form a company to be attached to the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, 
is granted, and arrangements will be made to muster into service the 
new company. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 277 

II. Col. Embury P. Clark, commanding the Second Regiment 
of Infantry, First Brigade, will at once arrange to muster into 
service the company at Pittsfield, to be attached to the Second 
Regiment of Infantry, as Company F. Authority is granted Col. 
E. P. Clark to make necessary details for this duty and to detail 
an officer as instructor. 

III. If the electors of the company after muster-in waive the 
right to legal notice, an election may be held. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, June 8, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 12. 

I. Commanding officers of camps upon the State camp ground 
will organize a fire department, to consist of one second lieutenant, 
two sergeants, six privates and forty-eight call men. This detach- 
ment may be detailed from the guard of the second regiment in 
line of camp, or may be separate, at the option of the command- 
ing officer of the camp. New apparatus has been provided, and 
the superintendent of the arsenal will turn over the same, with key 
to ladder house and buckets for call men, to the officer designated 
to command the fire detail, taking a receipt for all property so 
turned over. 

II. New locks and doors have been placed on the storehouse, 
and all officers or commands having property in the same must 
give written order to detachments to procure key from superintend- 
ent of arsenal. Detachments have in the past broken locks or 
doors to get out property. This is forbidden. The arsenal super- 
intendent can always provide keys when properly applied for. 

III. The bill of dress for officers of the Naval Brigade, M. V. M., 
as adopted under General Orders, No. 9, A. G. O., Boston, June 
1, 1897, is amended as follows : No stripes will be worn on either 
full dress, service dress or white uniform trousers. The white 
uniform shall be of white duck or linen ; white cap shall be the same 
as prescribed for use in the United State navy, with the exception 
that State buttons will be used instead of U. S. navy button on 
strap, and the device shall be an embroidered silver shield, charged 
with the arms and surmounted by the crest of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, the whole to be placed upon two crossed foul 
anchors embroidered in gold ; this device to be placed on a band of 
one and one-half inch black mohair braid. Leggings for officers 
will be same color as the leggings issued to enlisted men. 



278 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

IV. The First Battalion of Cavalry, Second Brigade, will 
perform its annual drill on July 19, by route march to South 
Framingham, under such orders as the commanding officer of the 
Second Brigade shall issue as to its hour of arrival at camp. 

V. The following appointments on the staff of the Commander- 
in-Chief are published for the information of the militia : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, Boston, June 7, 1901. 

Lieut. Col. James G. White of Newton, Assistant Inspector General, 
is hereby appointed Inspector General of Rifle Practice, with the rank 
of colonel, to date from June 7, 1901. 

Col. George H. Benyon of Watertown, retired, is hereby appointed 
Assistant Inspector General, with the rank of lieutenant colonel, to date 
from June 7, 1901. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

VI. The above-named officers, having been duly commissioned 
qualified and assigned to duty, will be obeyed and respected 
accordingly. 

VII. Brig. Gen. Wm. H. Brigham, Inspector General and 
Acting Inspector General of Rifle Practice, will turn over all books 
and papers of the office of Inspector General of Rifle Practice to 
Col. James G. White. 

VIII. Lieut. Col. George H. Benyon, Assistant Inspector 
General, will report to the Inspector General for duty. 

IX. Lieut. C. Wilder Holmes, commissary of First Regiment 
of Heavy Artillery, will report to the Commissary General on 
June 19 for duty as assistant commissary at camp of First Brigade. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, June 24, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 13. 

Permission is granted the regularly organized militia or national 
guard of all States to enter and pass through this Commonwealth, 
armed and equipped, en route to and returning from the Pan- 
American Exposition at Buffalo, N. Y., till Nov. 1, 1901. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 279 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, July 18, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 14. 

I. Before a court martial, convened pursuant to authority from 
headquarters First Brigade, M. V. M., by Special Orders, No. 38, 
dated July 12, 1900, and Special Orders, Nos. 17 and 18, head- 
quarters First Regiment Heavy Artillery, dated May 3 and June 
7, 1901, of which Lieut. Col. Charles B. Woodman was detailed to 
preside, were arraigned and tried : — 

(a) Private Oscar S. Pierson, Battery C, First Regiment Heavy 
Artillery, M. V. M. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders, in violation of the regula- 
tions for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, 
and violation of the provisions of the Acts of 1898, chapter 367. 

Specification. — In that Private Oscar S. Pierson, Battery C, 

First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., having received lawful 

commands from his captain, Charles F. Nostrom, through the first 

sergeant of his battery, George M. Wilkinson, and through the 

chief of his squad, Corp. John D. R. Wood worth, to attend the 

drills of his battery, did wilfully disobey said commands on several 

occasions since the camp of 1900, including annual inspection of 

his battery, April 15, 1901. This at Boston, on the 29th of April, 

1901. 

The accused not appearing, the court proceeded as if he were 

present and had pleaded Not Guilty. 

Finding. — The court finds Private Oscar S. Pierson, Battery 
C, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, Guilty of both specification 
and charge. 

Sentence. — The court sentences the said Private Oscar S. 
Pierson, Battery C, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to 
be discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

{b) Private Ambrose J. Purcell, Battery A, First Regiment 
Heavy Artillery. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders, in violation of the regula- 
tions for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

Specification. —In that Private Ambrose J. Purcell, Battery A, 
First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., having received sundry 
orders and notices from his captain, E. D wight Fullerton, to attend 
the drills of his battery and to account for his successive absences, 
has wilfully disobeyed and disregarded such orders and notices. 

The accused not appearing, the trial proceeded as if he were 
present and had pleaded Not Guilty. 

Finding. — The court finds Private Ambrose J. Purcell, Battery 



280 ADJUTANT GEKEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

A, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., Guilty of both 
specification and charge. 

Sentence. — The court sentences Private Ambrose J. Purcell, 
Battery A, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to be dis- 
charged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

(c) Private William F. Donlon, Battery C, First Regiment 
Heavy Artillery, M. V. M. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders, in violation of the regula- 
tions for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, 
and violation of the provisions of the Acts of 1898, chapter 367. 

Specification. — In that Private "William F. Donlon, Battery C, 
First Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., having received lawful commands 
from his captain, Charles F. Nostrom, through the first sergeant 
of his battery, George M. Wilkinson, to attend the drills of his 
battery, did wilfully disobey said commands, on several occasions 
since the camp of 1900, including annual inspection of his battery 
on the 22d of May, 1901. 

The accused not appearing, the trial proceeded as if he were 
present and had pleaded Not Guilty. 

Finding. — The court finds Private William F. Donlon Guilty 
of both specification and charge. 

Sentence. — The court sentences Private William F. Donlon, 
Battery C, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to be dis- 
charged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

II. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the cases of Privates Ambrose J. Purcell, Battery A, Oscar 
S. Pierson and William F. Donlon, Battery C, First Regiment 
Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to be regular and the sentences ade- 
quate, and the same having been submitted to the Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor, Acting Commander-in-Chief, the following are his orders : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, Boston, July 18, 1901. 

The sentences in the cases of Privates Ambrose J. Purcell, Battery A, 
Oscar S. Pierson and William F. Donlon, Battery C, First Regiment 
Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., are approved and will be carried into effect. 

(Signed) John L. Bates, 

Lieutenant Governor, Acting Commander-in-Chief, 

III. Privates Ambrose J. Purcell, Battery A, Oscar S. Pierson 
and William F. Donlon, Battery C, First Regiment Heavy Artil- 
lery, are discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, by- 
sentence of court martial. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, . 

Adjutant General.. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 281 



Common-wealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, July 31, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 15. 

I. Before a court martial, convened pursuant to authority from 
headquarters First Brigade, M. V. M., by Special Orders, No. 23, 
dated June 23, 1901, of which Maj. Cyrus H. Cook, Sixth Regi- 
ment Infantry, M. V. M., was detailed to preside, were arraigned 
and tried : — 

(a) Private James E. McCrackin, Company A, Sixth Regiment 
Infantry, M. V. M. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders in violation of the regulations 
for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, and to 
the prejudice of good order and military discipline. 

Specification. — In that Private James E. McCrackin, Company 
A, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., having received a lawful 
command from First Sergt. William A. Haley, did refuse to obey 
said command. This at South Framingham, on the twenty-eighth 
day of June, 1901. 

To which the accused pleaded as follows : — 

To the charge, Guilty. 

To the specification, Guilty. 

Finding. — The court, having maturely considered the evidence 
adduced, finds the accused, Private James E. McCrackin, Com- 
pany A, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. : — 

Of the specification, Guilty. 

Of the charge, Guilty. 

Sentence. — And the court therefore sentences him, Private James 
E. McCrackin, Company A, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., 
to be dishonorably discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia. 

(6) Private John J. Flannery, Company I, Sixth Regiment In- 
fantry, M. V. M. 

Charge 1. — Disobedience of orders, in violation of the regula- 
tions for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

Specification. — In that Private John J. Flannery, Company I, 
Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., having received a lawful com- 
mand from his superior officer, Capt. Francis T. Jackson, to report 
at the armory, Concord, at 12.45 p.m., June 21, 1901, for duty at 
South Framingham, did wilfully disobey the same order. This at 
Concord, Mass., on the twenty-first day of June, 1901. 



282 ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

Charge 2. — Absence without leave, in violation of the regula- 
tions for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

Specification. — In that Private John J. Flannery, Company I, 
Sixth Eegiment Infantry, M. V. M., did absent himself from his 
company without authority, at 12.45 p.m., June 21, 1901. This at 
Concord, Mass., on the twenty-first day of June, 1901. 

To which the accused pleaded as follows : — 

To specification, charge 1, Guilty. 

To charge 1, Guilty. 

To specification, charge 2, Guilty. 

To charge 2, Guilty. 

Finding. — The court, having maturely considered the charges 
and specifications and examined the witnesses and defendant, finds 
the accused, Private John J. Flannery, Company I, Sixth Regi- 
ment Infantry, M. V. M. : — 

Of the specification, charge 1, Guilty. 

Of charge 1, Guilty. 

Of the specification, charge 2, Guilty. 

Of charge 2, Guilty. 

Sentence. — And the court does therefore sentence him, Private 
John J. Flannery, Company I, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., 
to be dishonorably discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia. 

(c) Private Emile St. Onge, Company K, Sixth Regiment In- 
fantry, M. V. M. 

Charge 1. — Disobedience of a lawful order, in violation of the 
regulations for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia. 

Specification. — In that Private Emile St. Onge, Company K, 
Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., having received a lawful 
order from First Sergt. Herbert L. Smith, Company K, Sixth Regi- 
ment Infantry, M. V. M., to report at the cook house to perform 
duty as kitchen police, did wilfully refuse to obey the same. 

Charge 2. — Offering violence against his superior officer, in 
violation of the regulations for the government of the Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Militia. 

Specification. — In that Private Emile St. Onge, Company K, 
Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., having refused to obey a 
lawful order from First Serg. Herbert L. Smith, Company K, Sixth 
Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., did threaten violence against said 
First Sergt. Herbert L. Smith. This in camp at South Framing- 
ham, on the twenty-eighth of June, 1901. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 283 

To which the accused pleaded as follows : — 

To the specification, charge 1, . . . . Guilty. 

To charge 1, Guilty. 

To the specification, charge 2, . . . . Not Guilty. 

To charge 2, Not Guilty. 

Finding. — The court, having maturely considered the evidence 
adduced, finds the accused, Private Emile St. Onge, Company K, 
Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. : — 

Of the specification, charge 1, Guilty. 

Of charge 1, ....... Guilty. 

Of the specification, charge 2, . . Guilty. 

Of charge 2, Guilty. 

Sentence. — And the court does therefore sentence him, Private 
Emile St. Onge, Company K, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V.M., 
to be dishonorably discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia. 

II. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the cases of Private James E. McCrackin, Company A, 
Private John J. Flannery, Company I, and Private Emile St. Onge, 
Company K, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., to be regular and 
the sentences adequate, and the same having been submitted to 
the Lieutenant Governor, Acting Governor and Commander-in- 
Chief, the following are his orders : — 

Commonwealth op Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, State House, Boston, July 30, 1901. 

The finding of the court in the cases of Privates James E. McCrackin, 
Company A, John J. Flannery, Company I, and Emile St. Onge, Com- 
pany K, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., are approved, and the sen- 
tences will be carried into effect. 

(Signed) John L. Bates, Lieutenant Governor, 

Acting Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

III. Privates James E. McCrackin, Company A, John J. Flan- 
nery, Company I, and Emile St. Onge, Company K, Sixth Regi- 
ment Infantry, are hereby dishonorably discharged from the 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, by sentence of court martial. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



284 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Aug. 10, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 16. 

"T. The following is published for the information of the 
militia : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Department, Boston, Aug. 9, 1901. 

In consideration of the reports and recommendation of the Inspector 
General and Capt. George R. H. Buffinton, commanding Naval Brigade, 
it appears that Company D, Naval Brigade, has fallen below the standard 
of efficiency. Let an order be issued disbanding said company, and 
arrangements made at once for the proper care of United States and 
State property of the command. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

II. Company D, Naval Brigade, is hereby disbanded. Capt. 
George R. H. Buffinton, commanding Naval Brigade, M. V. M., 
will at once make arrangements for the proper care of United 
States and State property, detailing an officer to receipt for the 
property, and forward the same by freight to the State arsenal, 
sending invoices of same to this office, excepting such property as 
may be turned over to the other companies of his command. 

III. Captain Buffinton, at his discretion, may transfer any 
desirable men of Company D, disbanded, and at once notify this 
office of such transfers, when honorable discharges for officers and 
men will be issued from this office. 

IV. Commanding officers will not drop from returns any record 
books or property until application is made to this office and the 
same approved. 

Bv order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Aug. 30, 190L 

General Orders, No. 17. 

I. Before a regimental court martial convened at Taunton, 
July 9, 1901, pursuant to authority from headquarters First 
Brigade, M. V. M., by Special Orders, No. 38, dated July 12, 
1900, and Special Orders, No. 23, dated headquarters First Regi- 
ment Heavy Artillery, July 1, 1901, and of which Lieut. Col. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 285 

Charles B. Woodman, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, was presi- 
dent, was arraigned and tried : — 

(a) Private Ernest A. Staples, Battery F, First Regiment Heavy 
Artillery, M. V. M. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders, in violation of the regula- 
tions for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

Specification. — In that Private Ernest A. Staples, Battery F, 
First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., having received a law- 
ful command from his Captain, Norris O. Danforth, through the 
chief of his squad, Corp. Horace J. Rounseville, to attend the 
drills of his battery, did wilfully disobey the said command. This 
at the armory of said Battery F, at Taunton, Mass., on several 
occasions since the camp of 1900. 

The accused appeared, and pleaded guilty to the charge and 
specification. 

Findings. — The court finds the accused, Private Ernest A. 
Staples, Battery F, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M. : — 

Of the specification, Guilty. 

Of the charge, Guilty. 

Sentence. — The court sentences Private Ernest A. Staples, 
Battery F, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to be dis- 
charged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

II. Before a regimental court martial, convened at camp Wil- 
liam C. Dow, at Boxford, July 12, 1901, pursuant to authority 
from headquarters Second Brigade, M. V. M., by Special Orders, 
No. 68, dated Aug. 8, 1899, and held at headquarters Eighth 
Regiment Infantry, under orders of the colonel commanding, of 
which Lieut. Col. E. W. M. Bailey, Eighth Regiment of Infantry, 
M. V. M., was president, was arraigned and tried : — 

(6) Private John P. Murray, Company M, Eighth Regiment 
Infantry, M. V. M. 

Charge. — Disobedience of orders, in violation of the regula- 
tions for the government of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

First Specification. — In that Private John P. Murray, Company 
M, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., having been notified by 
his superior officer, did fail to report for duty with his company, 
in accordance with General Orders, No. 3, and Special Orders, No. 
47, A. G. O., current series. This at Somerville, on the sixth 
day of July, 1901. 

Second Specification. — In that Private John P. Murray, Com- 
pany M, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., having been later 
brought to camp by a detail sent for that purpose, did refuse to 



286 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 

obey a lawful order given by his company commander, namely, to 
fall in for drill with his company. This at Camp William C. Dow, 
at Boxford, on the ninth day of July, 1901. To which the accused 
pleaded as follows : — 

To the second specification, .... Guilty. 

To the first specification, Not Guilty. 

To the charge, Not Guilty. 

Findings. — The court finds Private John P. Murray, Company 
M, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. : — 

Of the second specification, Guilty. 

Of the first specification, Guilty. 

Of the charge, Guilty. 

Sentence. — And the court does therefore sentence him, Private 
John P. Murray, Company M, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., 
to be dishonorably discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer 
Militia. 

III. The Judge Advocate General, having declared the pro- 
ceedings in the cases of Privates Ernest A. Staples, Battery F, 
First Heavy Artillery, and John P. Murray, Company M, Eighth 
Infantry, M. V. M., to be regular and the sentences adequate, and 
the same having been submitted to the Governor and Commander- 
in-Chief, the following are his orders : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, State House, Boston, Aug. 19, 1901. 

The findings of the court in the cases of Privates Ernest A. Staples, 
Battery F, First Heavy Artillery, and John P. Murray, Company M, 
Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., are approved, and the sentences 
in each case will be carried into effect. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

IV. Private Ernest A. Staples, Battery F, First Heavy Artil- 
lery, is discharged, and Private John P. Murray, Company M, 
Eighth Regiment Infantry, dishonorably discharged, from the Mas- 
sachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 






1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 287 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Sept. 7, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 18. 

I. In compliance with General Orders, No. 5, current series, 
the State general rifle and carbine competitions will be held on the 
range of the Massachusetts Rifle Association, Walnut Hill, Woburn. 

II. The rifle competition will be held on Thursday, Sept. 26, 
1901. 

III. Special details of officers and men for duty at this com- 
petition are as follows : — 

Lieut. Col. Otis H. Marion, medical director, First Brigade, 
with brigade hospital steward, in charge of the medical depart- 
ment. 

Maj. Herbert A. Clark, A. I. G. R. P., Second Brigade, as super- 
visor at 200 yards. 

Lieut. Col. Elmore E. Locke, A. A. G., Second Brigade, as 
supervisor at 500 yards. 

Maj. Charles D. Wainwright, A. I. G. R. P., First Brigade, as 
assistant supervisor at 500 yards. 

Lieut. Col. Walter C. Hagar, A. A. G., First Brigade, as statis- 
tical officer. He will arrange for score sheets and supplies neces- 
sary for his duties. Score cards will be furnished by the Inspector 
General of Rifle Practice. 

Brig. Gen. Jophanus H. Whitney, Second Brigade, will detail 
one sergeant clerk from his non-commissioned staff for duty in the 
statistical department. 

Capt. William B. Emery, First Brigade staff, in charge of the 
500-yard pit. 

Capt. Hugh Bancroft, Second Brigade staff, in charge of the 
200-yard pit. 

Lieut. George E. Lovett, signal officer, First Brigade, with two 
enlisted men from his corps, in charge of telephone communications 
at 500 yards. 

Lieut. William H. Sprague, signal officer, Second Brigade, with 
two enlisted men from his corps, in charge of telephone communi- 
cations at 200 yards. 

Capt. Clifton H. Dwinnell, paymaster, Sixth Infantry, with 
Paymaster Sergeant, in charge of muster and pay rolls. 

Col. William A. Pew, Jr., Eighth Infantry, will detail one 
bugler from his command. 

Each regimental and corps commander, including the Naval 
Brigade, will detail one officer and one non-commissioned officer 



288 



ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. 



[Jan. 



to"act as supervisor and scorer at 200 yards, and also one officer 
and one non-commissioned officer for similar duties at 500 yards. 
IV. The following are the assignments of targets, teams, super- 
visors and scorers at 200 yards : — 







Targets and Teams. 


Supervisors and Scorers. 


No. 


2. 


Sixth Infantry, . 


Fifth Infantry. 


No. 


3. 


Ninth Infantry, ... 


Naval Brigade. 


No. 


4. 


Second Corps Cadets, 


Second Infantry. 


No. 


5. 


Fifth Infantry, . 


Sixth Infantry. 


No. 


6. 


First Heavy Artillery, 


Eighth Infantry. 


No. 


7. 


First Corps Cadets, . 


Ninth Infantry. 


No. 


8. 


Eighth Infantry, 


Second Corps Cadets. 


No. 


9. 


Second Infantry, 


First Heavy Artillery. 


No. 


10. 


Naval Brigade, . 


First Corps Cadets. 


'. Assignments at 500 yards : — 








First Division. 








Targets and Teams. 


Supervisors and Scorers. 


No. 


1. 


Second Infantry, 


Eighth Infantry. 


No. 


2. 


First Heavy Artillery, 


Sixth Infantry. 


No. 


3. 


Eighth Infantry, 


. Second Infantry. 


No. 


4. 


Sixth Infantry, . 


. First Corps Cadets. 


No. 


5. 


Naval Brigade, . 

Second Division 


Second Corps Cadets. 






Targets and Teams. 


Supervisors and Scorers. 


No. 


1. 


Second Corps Cadets, 


. First Heavy Artillery 


No. 


2. 


Fifth Infantry, . 


Ninth Infantry. 


No. 


3. 


Ninth Infantry, . 


Fifth Infantry. 


No. 


4. 


First Corps Cadets, . 


. Naval Brigade. 



Teams in the first division will begin shooting at 500 yards as 
soon as the first pair on each team have finished their score at 200 
yards. 

VI. The carbine competition will be held on Thursday, 
October 3. 

VII. Special details of officers and men in connection with 
this competition are as follows : — 

Maj. George W. Mills, surgeon, First Battalion Cavalry, with 
battalion hospital steward, in charge of the medical department. 

Lieut. John M. Portal, I. R. P., First Heavy Artillery, as 
supervisor. 

Lieut. Joseph S. Hart, I. R. P., Sixth Infantry, in charge of 
pits. 

Lieut. William A. Hayes, I. R. P., First Corps Cadets, as 
statistical officer. He will arrange for score sheets and the supplies 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 289 

necessary for his duties. Score cards will be furnished by the 
Inspector General of Rifle Practice. 

Lieut. Henry B. Clapp, paymaster, First Battalion Light Artil- 
lery, in charge of muster and pay rolls. 

Brig. Gen. Thomas P. Mathews, First Brigade, will detail one 
sergeant clerk from his non-commissioned staff for duty in the 
statistical department. 

Maj. Lawrence N. Duchesney, First Battalion Light Artillery, 
will detail one bugler from his command. 

Lieut. Alfred Mudge, I. R. P., First Battalion Cavalry, will 
report to the Inspector General of Rifle Practice, on the range, for 
such duties as may be assigned him. 

Lieut. "William H. Sprague, signal officer, Second Brigade, will 
detail two enlisted men from his corps to take charge of telephone 
communications. 

Each troop commander will detail one officer and one non-com- 
missioned officer to act as supervisor and scorer. 

Paymaster Sergeant George R. Russell, N. C. S., First Heavy 
Artillery, will report to the Inspector General of Rifle Practice, 
on the range. 

VIII. Assignments of targets, teams, supervisors and scorers 
at 200 yards are as follows : — 

Targets and Teams. Supervisors and Scorers. 

No. 2. Troop D Troop F. 

No. 4. Troop A, Troop D. 

No. 6. Troop F, Troop A. 

IX. Assignments at 500 yards : — 

Targets and Teams. Supervisors and Scorers. 

No. 1. Troop F Troop D. 

No. 3. Troop A, Troop F. 

No. 5. Troop D, ....... Troop A. 

X. These competitions will be under the command of Col. 
James G. White, Inspector General of Rifle Practice, who will 
arrange all details and be responsible for their proper execution. 

Team captains and officers and men detailed for duty in connec- 
tion with these competitions will report to him, on the range, not 
later than 9.30 a.m. 

Inspectors of rifle practice not on detail will report, on the range, 
for such duties as may be assigned them. 

Muster and pay rolls for these competitions will be handed to 
the paymaster detailed for duty, on arrival at the range. Teams 
and all officers and men will muster for pay before leaving. 



290 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

A train, with special cars, will leave the North Union Station 
(Causeway Street), at 8.34 a.m., on Sept. 26 and Oct. 3, 1901. 

XI. General Conditions. — Competitors, to be eligible to shoot 
in these competitions, must have performed not less than four days 
State duty during the present year. 

Ammunition will be furnished by teams or individuals, and will 
be "fixed," i.e., sufficiently crimped to hold the bullet, which must 
be seated in the shell deep enough to cover the grooves. 

Rifles and carbines will be held subject to test of trigger pull. 
Minimum pull, six pounds. Cleaning allowed between ranges 
only. 

The time limit of one minute per shot will be enforced. 

Protests will be made in writing, on the range, and the decision 
of the Inspector General of Rifle Practice will be final. 

XII. Uniform. — For officers, fatigue with side arms, except 
for those shooting on teams. For enlisted men, except the Naval 
Brigade, fatigue with campaign hat and leggings, overcoats in 
collar roll. 

For enlisted men of the Naval Brigade, such as may be ordered 
by the commanding officer. 

XIII. Regimental and corps commanders will notify the In- 
spector General of Rifle Practice of the time and place selected 
for regimental or corps competitions, and submit list of officers 
and men detailed for duty, for his approval, at least one week pre- 
vious to the competition. Reports of the competition, giving the 
scores, in shot for shot detail, will be forwarded to the Inspector 
General of Rifle Practice direct. 

XIV. All communications in regard to these competitions will 
be forwarded to the Inspector General of Rifle Practice direct. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Sept. 14, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 19. 

I. The Commander-in-Chief, with profound sorrow, announces 
the death of President William McKinley, which occurred at Buf- 
falo, in the State of New York, at fifteen minutes past 2 o'clock, 
on the morning of September 14. 

II. As a tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased, the 
officers of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia will wear the usual 
badge of mourning for ninety days ; and, on occasions of ceremony, 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 291 

all regimental and battalion colors will be draped with crape for 
the same period. The national color will be displayed at half staff 
on the arsenal and all armories of the State until and including the 
day of the funeral. 

III. On the day of the funeral, the commanding officer of 
Light Battery A, Second Brigade, will cause guns to be fired on 
Boston Common at intervals of thirty minutes from sunrise to 
1 o'clock p.m. ; and during the hour of the funeral ceremonies, 
minute-guns ; and at the close of the day he will fire a national 
salute. 

IV. Brigade and cadet corps commanders are charged with the 
promulgation of this order. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Oct. 9, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 20. 

On the recommendation of Col. James G. White, Inspector 
General of Rifle Practice, M. V. M., and in consequence of inter- 
ruption of practice at the ranges, so much of Paragraph I, General 
Orders, No. 5, current series, as relates to the close of the shooting 
season, and the date on which returns shall be made, is hereby 
amended so as to extend the shooting season to Saturday, Novem- 
ber 16, and the date on which returns shall be received to Monday, 
Nov. 25, 1901 ; otherwise General Orders, No. 5, remains in full 
force. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Nov. 15, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 21. 

I. Before a regimental court martial convened at Brockton, 
Mass., pursuant to Special Orders, No. 58, headquarters First 
Brigade, dated July 12, 1900, and Special Orders, No. 58, dated 
headquarters First Regiment Heavy Artillery, Aug. 21, 1901, of 
which Lieut. Col. Charles B. Woodman, First Heavy Artillery was 
presiding officer, was arraigned and tried : — 

Private Charles Moister, Battery I, First Regiment Heavy Artil- 
lery, M. V. M. 



292 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

Charge 1. — Disrespect to his superior officer. 

Specification 1. — In that Private Charles Moister, a member of 
Battery I, First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., on the 
evening of Aug. 15, 1901, was disrespectful to his superior officer, 
namely, Capt. George E. Horton. This about 8.30 p.m. 

Charge 2. — Conduct unbecoming a soldier. 

Specification 1. — In that Private Charles Moister, a member of 
Battery I, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., did use dis- 
respectful language in addressing his superior officer, namely, Capt. 
George E. Horton. This about 8.30 p.m. 

Charge 3. — Disrespect to a non-commissioned officer. 

Specification 1. — In that Private Charles Moister, a member of 
Battery I, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., was disre- 
spectful to Sergt. George A. Varney. This at drill on the even- 
ing of May 13, 1901. 

Charge 4. — Absence from drills. 

Specification 1. — In that Private Charles Moister, a member of 
Battery I, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., being ordered 
to attend drills on the evenings of July 15 and 22, 1901, was absent 
on those dates. The above violations of discipline occurring at 
Brockton, Mass. 

Plea. — The defendant pleaded Guilty to each charge and speci- 
fication. 

Finding. — The court finds Private Charles Moister, Battery I, 
First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., Guilty. 

Sentence. — The court sentences Private Charles Moister, Bat- 
tery I, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to be repri- 
manded by his regimental commander, and to be discharged from 
the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

II. Before regimental courts martial which convened at Boston 
and New Bedford, pursuant to Special Orders, Nos. 41 and 42, 
dated headquarters Naval Brigade, M. V. M., Sept. 9, 1901, of 
which Lieut. Comrs. William B. Edgar and James H. Dillaway, 
Jr., were detailed to preside, were arraigned and tried : — 

(a) Seaman Joseph A. Sanders, Jr. , Company G, Naval Brigade, 
M.V. M. 

Charge 1. — Disobedience of orders. 

Specification 1. —In this, that Seaman Joseph A. Sanders, Jr., 
Company G, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., did wilfully disobey the 
special orders of his company commander to be present at the drill 
of Aug. 12, 1901. This at New Bedford, Aug. 12, 1901. 

Specification 2. — In that Seaman Joseph A. Sanders, Jr., Com- 
pany G, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., did wilfully disobey the special 
order of his company commander to be present at the armory at 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 293 

8.30 a.m., Aug. 17, 1901, for tour of duty. This at New Bedford, 
Aug. 17, 1901. 

Charge 2. — Neglect of duty, to the prejudice of good order 
and military discipline. 

Specification 1. — In this, that Seaman Joseph A. Sanders, Jr., 
Company G, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., has repeatedly neglected 
to attend the regular drills of his company, without offering excuse 
for non-attendance. This at New Bedford, May 27, 1901, to 
Aug. 17, 1901. 

Specification 2. — In this, that Seaman Joseph A. Sanders, Jr., 
Company C, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., did wilfully neglect to 
attend the tour of duty Aug. 17, 1901, to Aug. 24, 1901. This at 
New Bedford, Aug. 17, 1901, to Aug. 24, 1901. 

The accused not appearing, the court proceeded as if he were 
present and had pleaded Not Guilty. 

Finding. — The court finds Seaman Joseph A. Sanders, Jr., 
Company G, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., of all the charges and 
specifications, Guilty. 

Sentence. — The court sentences Seaman Joseph A. Sanders, 
Jr., Company G, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., to be dishonorably 
discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

(6) Seaman Frank I. Smith, Company C, Naval Brigade, 
M.V. M. 

Charge 1. — Neglect of duty. 

Specification 1. — In that having been notified of and ordered to 
be present at the annual tour of duty at Camp Weeks, Fort Rod- 
man, New Bedford, the said Seaman Frank I. Smith, Company C, 
Naval Brigade, M. V. M., did wilfully, and without excuse, ab- 
sent himself from this tour of duty, Aug. 17 to 24, 1901. 

Charge 2. — Disobedience of orders. 

Specification 1. — A copy of General Orders, No. 3, current 
series, Company C, Naval Brigade, was mailed to said Frank I. 
Smith, Company C, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., Aug. 9, 1901, or- 
dering him to be in the armory at 7 a.m., Aug. 17, 1901, ready for 
the tour of duty. He, the said Frank I. Smith, not only failed to 
appear on Aug. 17, 1901, but did not get to camp at any time dur- 
ing the tour of duty. 

Specification 2. — On Wednesday evening, Aug. 14, 1901, Lieut. 
Charles H. Parker, his commanding officer, gave him verbal, posi- 
tive order to be present on Saturday morning, Aug. 17, 1901, at 
the armory of Company C, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., at 7 o'clock 
a.m., ready for the tour of duty. He failed to present himself at 
the time and place stated, and has not been present since. 

In answer to the summons, the accused did not appear. There- 



294 ADJUTANT GENEBAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 

fore the court proceeded as though the accused had been present 
and pleaded Not Guilty. 

Findings. — The court finds Seaman Frank I. Smith, Company 
C, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., Guilty of both charges and speci- 
fications. 

Sentence. — The court sentences Seaman Frank I. Smith, Com- 
pany C, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., to be dishonorably discharged 
from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

III. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the cases of Private Charles Moister, Battery I, First Regi- 
ment Heavy Artillery, Seaman Joseph A. Sanders, Jr., Company 
G, and Frank I. Smith, Company C, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., to 
be regular and the sentences adequate, and the same having been 
submitted to the Governor and Commander-in-Chief, the following 
are his orders : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, Boston, Nov. 15, 1901. 

The sentences of the courts in the cases of Private Charles Moister, 
Battery I, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, and Seamen Joseph A. San- 
ders, Jr., Company G, and Frank I. Smith, Company C, Naval Brigade, 
M. V. M., are approved and will be carried into effect. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

IV. Private Charles Moister, Battery I, First Eegiment Heavy 
Artillery, M. V. M., is discharged from the Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Militia, and Seamen Joseph A. Sanders, Jr., Company G, and 
Frank I. Smith, Company C, Naval Brigade, M. V. M., are dis- 
honorably discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia by 
sentence of courts martial. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Dec. 12, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 22. 

I. Before a regimental court martial convened at Lowell, Mass., 
Aug. 16, 1901, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 29, headquarters 
First Brigade, M. V. M., dated July 25, 1901, of which Lieut. Col. 
George H. Priest, Sixth Infantry, M. V. M., was president, was 
arraigned and tried Private Charles C. Johnson, Company G, Sixth 
Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 295 

Charge. — Absence without leave, in violation of the regulations 
of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

Specification. — In that Private Charles C. Johnson, Company 
G, Sixth Regiment, M. V. M., did absent himself from his com- 
pany without leave from his commanding officer, from June 21 to 
June 29, 1901. This at Lowell, on the twenty-ninth day of June, 
1901. 

Plea. — To which the accused pleaded as follows : — 

To the charge, Guilty. 

To the specification, Guilty. 

Finding. — The court finds Private Charles C. Johnson, Com- 
pany G, Sixth Regiment, M. V. M., Guilty of both specification 
and charge. 

Sentence. — The court sentences him, Private Charles C. John- 
son, Company G, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., to be dis- 
honorably discharged from the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

II. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the case of Private Charles C. Johnson, Company G, Sixth 
Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., to be regular and the sentence 
adequate, and the same having been submitted to the Governor 
and Commander-in-Chief, the following are his orders : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, Boston, Dec. 11, 1901. 

The sentence of the court in the case of Private Charles C. Johnson, 
Company G, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M., is approved and the 
sentence will be carried into effect. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

III. Private Charles C. Johnson, Company G, Sixth Regiment 
Infantry, M. V. M., is hereby dishonorably discharged from the 
Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, by sentence of court martial. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Dec. 18, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 23. 

I. Before a regimental court martial convened at Cambridge, 
Mass., Nov. 11, 1901, under Special Orders, No. 38, headquarters 
First Brigade, M. V. M., and Special Orders, No. 68, headquarters 



296 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., of which Lieut. Col. 
Charles B. Woodman, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., 
was president, was arraigned and tried : — 

Private William G-. Stafford, Battery B, First Regiment Heavy 
Artillery, M. V. M. 

Charge 1. — Disobedience of orders. 

Specification 1. — In that Private William G-. Stafford, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., did wilfully disobey 
the special orders of his battery commander to visit the rifle range 
at Lexington, Mass., for the purpose of qualifying. This at Lex- 
ington, Mass., Nov. 1, 1900, to Oct. 15, 1901. 

Specification 2. — In that Private William G. Stafford, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., did wilfully disobey 
the orders of his battery commander to pay his assessments on 
Oct. 14, 1901. This at Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 14, 1901. 

Specification 3. — In that Private William G-. Stafford, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., did wilfully refuse 
to obey the orders of his battery commander to desist from inso- 
lently and. disrespectfully addressing his superior officer, to wit : 
Capt. Walter E. Lombard, Battery B, First Regiment Heavy 
Artillery, M. V. M. This at Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 14, 1901. 

Specification 4. — In that Private William G-. Stafford, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., did wilfully disobey 
the orders of his colonel, as transmitted by his battery commander, 
to be present at an ordered inspection by the colonel commanding. 
This at Cambridge, Mass., June 3, 1901. 

Charge 2. — Disrespect to his superior officers, to the prejudice 
of good order and military discipline. 

Specification 1. — In that Private William G-. Stafford, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., did appear in the 
armory of his battery and proceeded to disrespectfully and inso- 
lently address, and after being ordered to desist, did so continue 
to address, his superior officer, Capt. Walter E. Lombard, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M. This at Cambridge, 
Mass., Oct. 14, 1901. 

Specification 2. — In that Private William G-. Stafford, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., did in the armory 
of his battery, and in the presence of members of the battery, make 
remarks of the most insolent and disrespectful nature concerning 
his battery commander, Capt. Walter E. Lombard. This at Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Oct. 14, 1901. 

Charge 3. — Neglect of duty, to the prejudice of good order 
and military discipline. 

Specification 1. — In that Private William G-. Stafford, Battery 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 297 

B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., has repeatedly 
neglected to attend the regular drills of his battery, without offer- 
ing excuse for non-attendance, as ordered to do by his battery 
commander. This at Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 1 to Oct. 15, 1901. 

Specification 2. — In that Private William G. Stafford, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., has failed to visit 
the rifle range, as ordered to do, in order to qualify as marksman. 
This at Lexington, Mass., Nov. 1, 1900, to Oct. 15, 1901. 

Specification 3. — In that Private William G-. Stafford, Battery 
B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., has neglected to 
pay his battery assessments for eighteen months. This at Cam- 
bridge, Mass., April 1, 1900, to Oct. 15, 1901. 

The accused not appearing, although summoned, the court pro- 
ceeded to the trial as though the accused had appeared and pleaded 
Not Guilty. 

Findings. — The court finds the specifications and charges 
sustained by testimony adduced, and that Private William G. 
Stafford, Battery B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., is 
Guilty of all specifications and charges. 

Sentence. — The court therefore sentences him, the said Private 
William G. Stafford, Battery B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, 
M. V. M., to be dishonorably discharged from the Massachusetts 
Volunteer Militia. 

II. The Judge Advocate General having declared the proceed- 
ings in the case of Private William G. Stafford, Battery B, First 
Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., to be regular and the sen- 
tence adequate, and the same having been submitted to the 
Commander-in-Chief, his orders are as follows : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Executive Chamber, State House, Boston, Dec. 17, 1901. 

The findings of the court in the case of Private William G. Stafford, 
Battery B, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., are approved, and 
the sentence will be carried into effect. 

(Signed) W. Murray Crane, 

Governor' and Commander-in-Chief. 

III. Private William G. Stafford, Battery B, First Regiment 
Heavy Artillery, M. V. M., is hereby dishonorably discharged from 
the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, by sentence of court-martial. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



298 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Adjutant General's Office, Boston, Dec. 31, 1901. 

General Orders, No. 24. 

On report and recommendation of Col. James G. White, Inspect- 
or General of Rifle Practice, the following awards of prizes and 
trophies won in competitions, under General Orders, Nos. 5 and 18, 
current series, are published for the information of the militia : — 

Regimental and Corps Competitions. 

I. Company teams of fifteen, fifteen shots at 200 yards ; pos- 
sible score, 1,125 points. 

First Heavy Artillery. — Competition held at Walnut Hill, Oc- 
tober 22. Winning team, Battery B of Cambridge ; score, 935. 

Second Infantry. — Competition held at Holyoke, October 17. 
Winning team, Company B of Springfield; score, 889. 

Fifth Infantry. — Competition held at Lexington, October 10. 
Winning team, Company G of Woburn ; score, 969. 

Sixth Infantry.. — Competition held at Lexington, October 14. 
Winning team, Company A of Wakefield ; score, 974. 

Eighth Infantry. — Competition held at Lynn, October 24. 
Winning team, Company I of Lynn ; score, 919. 

Ninth Infantry. — Competition held at Walnut Hill, November 
1. Winning team, Company A of Boston ; score, 847. 

First Corps Cadets. — Competition held at Lexington, October 
19. Winning team, Company C of Boston ; score, 852. 

Second Corps Cadets. — Competition held at Marblehead, Sep- 
tember 20. Winning team, Company D of Salem; score, 795. 

Naval Brigade. — Competition held at Walnut Hill, October 27. 
Winning team, Company H of Springfield ; score, 870. 

State General Rifle Competition. 

II. Teams of fifteen, ten shots each, at 200 and 500 yards ; 
possible score, 1,500 points. 

Competition held at Walnut Hill, September 26. Winning team, 
Sixth Infantry ; score, 1,268. 

Second team, First Heavy Artillery ; score, 1,263. 
Individual prizes (medals) were won as follows : — 

First. — Sergt. Henry B. Pratt, Company F, Fifth Infantry, 91 
Second. — Priv. Freeman Hinckley, Company C, First 

Corps Cadets, 91 

Third. — Lieut. Elmer E. Morrison, Company A, Sixth 

Infantry 90 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 299 

Fourth. — Corp. Edwin A. Thresher, Battery B, First 
Heavy Artillery, 90 

Fifth. — Priv. William R. Murphy, Company A, Sixth In- 
fantry, 88 

Sixth. — Lieut. John F. Williams, Company F, Fifth In- 
fantry, 88 

Seventh, — Priv. Ernest V. Johnson, Company B, Second 
Infantry, 87 

Eighth. — Priv. Chester A. Coombs, Company A, Sixth 
Infantry, 87 

Ninth. — Q. M. Sergt. Fred R. Daniels, Company B, Second 
Infantry, 86 

Tenth. — Priv. George M. Jefts, Company A, Sixth In- 
fantry, 86 

Eleventh. — Priv. Harry C. Ellis, Battery E, First Heavy 
Artillery, 86 

Twelfth. — First Sergt. Frank A. Wakefield, Company B, 
Second Infantry, 85 

Thirteenth. — Priv. William M. Campbell, Company D, 
Eighth Infantry, 85 

Fourteenth. — Chief Boatswain's Mate A. F. Cary, Com- 
pany E, Naval Brigade, * 85 

Fifteenth. — Sergt. David D. McTaggart, Company A, 
Second Infantry, 85 

The fifteen competitors, without regard to class, making the 
highest aggregate scores, who win individual prizes (cups) and 
who constitute the State team for 1902, are as follows : — 

First. — Lieut. Edmond E. Baudoin, Company G, Naval 
Brigade, . 94 

Second. — Priv. Thomas Anderton, Battery B, First Heavy 
Artillery, 93 

Third. — Sergt. Henry B. Pratt, Company F, Fifth Infantry, 9 1 

Fourth. — Sergt. Freeman Hinckley, Company C, First 
Corps Cadets, 91 

Fifth. — Maj. Warren E. Sweetser, Sixth Infantry, . . 90 

Sixth. — Lieut. Elmer E. Morrison, Company A, Sixth In- 
fantry, 90 

Seventh. — Corp. Edwin A. Thresher, Battery B, First 
Heavy Artillery, 90 

Eighth. — Sergt. Charles J. Jeffers, Company D, Eighth 
Infantry, 89 

Ninth. — Color Sergt. Charles Frost, Ninth Infantry, . 89 

Tenth. — Priv. James C. Cadigan, Company M, Second In- 
fantry, 88 

Eleventh. — Priv. William R. Murphy, Company A, Sixth 
Infantry, 88 



300 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPORT. [Jan. 

Twelfth. — Sergt. Stuart W. Wise, Company C, First Corps 

Cadets, 88 

Thirteenth. — Lieut. John F. Williams, Company F, Fifth 

Infantry, . .88 

Fourteenth. — Priv. Maurice W. Parker, Company D, First 

Corps Cadets, 88 

Fifteenth. — Capt. Clifford E. Hamilton, Company F, Fifth 

Infantry, . . ' 88 

Cavalry Competition. 

III. Troop teams of ten, ten shots each at 200 and 500 yards ; 
possible score, 1,000 points. 

Competition held at Walnut Hill, October 3. Winning team, 
Troop D of Boston ; score, 742. 

Individual prizes (medals) were won as follows : — 

First. — Sergt. E. F. Tandy, Troop D, First Battalion Cav- 
alry, 79 

Second. — Priv. L. G. Smith, Troop D, First Battalion Cav- 
alry, . 78 

Individual prizes (cups) were won as follows : — 

First. — First Lieut. Edward H. Keyes, Troop F, unattached 
cavalry, 87 

Second. — Corp. William L. Swan, Troop D, First Bat- 
talion Cavalry, 82 

IV. The Sixth Infantry is entitled to carry the "Tri-Color" 
on its colors during the year 1902. 

Troop D, First Battalion Cavalry, is entitled to carry the " Gui- 
don Trophy" during the year 1902. 

The commanding officer of the First Heavy Artillery will, on 
receipt of this order, turn over to the commanding officer of the 
Sixth Infantry the " Tri-Color" now held by his command. 

Likewise the commanding officer of Troop F, unattached cavalry, 
will turn over to the commanding officer of Troop D, First Battalion 
Cavalry, the " Guidon Trophy." , 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

Samuel Dalton, 

Adjutant General. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 301 



CIRCULARS. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Surgeon General's Office, Boston, Jan. 15, 1901. 
Circular. 

The following papers were read before the School for Medical 
Officers, presided over by Lieut. Col. William H. Devine, medical 
director Second Brigade, M. V. M., at the East Armory, Boston, 
Dec. 18, 1900: — 

4 'The Medical Officer and his Papers," — by Maj. Charles C. 
Foster, surgeon, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

"The Duties of Medical Officers on the March," — by Maj. 
Thomas L. Jenkins, surgeon, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

"Management of a Field Hospital," — by Maj. John P. Lom- 
bard, surgeon, Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

"Care of Sinks," — by Maj. George Westgate Mills, surgeon, 
First Battalion Cavalry, Second Brigade, M. V. M. 

"First Aid on the Firing Line," — by Capt. Henry D. Chad- 
wick, assistant surgeon, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

"The Ideal Type of Medical Officer," — by Capt. F. P. T. 
Logan, assistant surgeon, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

" Knowledge of First Aid required by Officers and Men," — by 
Capt. James E. McGourty, assistant surgeon, Ninth Regiment 
Infantry, M. V. M. 

" Suggestions relative to the Increased Value of the Medical 
Department, M. V. M.," — by First Lieut. Hugh Cabot, assistant 
surgeon, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

"Sword and Bayonet Wounds," — by First Lieut. Charles S. 
Butler, assistant surgeon, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

"Treatment of Modern Gun-shot Wounds," — by First Lieut. 
J. A. Cronin, assistant surgeon, Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

" Glanders," — by First Lieut. Austin Peters, veterinary surgeon, 
First Battalion Cavalry, M. V. M. 

Robert A. Blood, 

Surgeon General. 



The Medical Officer and his Papers. 

By Maj. Charles C. Foster, Surgeon, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

The first thought of the volunteer medical officer is apt to be, 
why should he be bothered with all these papers ? He thinks them 
an unmitigated nuisance, and is sure that nine-tenths of them are 
wholly unnecessary, or even worse, for they take up time that 
might better be spent on his work. In his own practice he needs 



302 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

but little paper work, and fails to see why so much should be 
required of him now. The difference can be told in one word, — 
responsibility. 

His own practice is his own affair. When he has done his duty 
by his patient, other details, such as collecting his bill, concern him 
alone. His medicines, dressings, instruments and other equip- 
ment are his own property, to be procured, used, wasted or lost, 
as he sees fit. He can undertake or decline any case that comes 
to him, and is responsible only to his own conscience and the law. 

When he enters the service, all this is changed. He becomes 
simply an agent of the government, given certain powers, held 
strictly accountable for every action and for every article of property 
put into his care, and required to keep the heads of his depart- 
ment constantly informed as to all medical events in the command 
to which he is attached. To fulfil these duties, a regular system 
of reports is necessary ; and, for the sake of uniformity, accuracy 
and labor saving, a special blank form has been devised for each 
ordinary occasion, these constituting our papers. 

Now, what particular system of papers shall we use ? Obviously 
the same that we shall have to use in active service, — that of the 
Regular Army. This contains practically all the forms that we 
need in our militia work, besides a number with which we need 
not concern ourselves at present. Let us consider the use of a 
few of the most important ones. 

The first duty of a newly assigned medical officer is to provide 
himself with the necessary materials of all sorts. He procures 
these by making out a " requisition," which is simply a statement 
of what he wants, on the regular form provided. He makes this 
in duplicate, keeps one copy for his own records, and forwards the 
other through regular channels ; that is to say, he sends it to his 
next senior adjutant. What becomes of it afterwards is the latter's 
business. 

By and by the supplies arrive, perhaps all he has asked for, 
perhaps only such articles as his seniors think fitting, and with 
them comes an " invoice," in duplicate, — a list of the articles, 
signed by the officer issuing them. He verifies this list, makes 
sure that everything is there, then files it among his records, and 
makes out a "receipt" for them, in duplicate, keeping one copy 
and forwarding the other to the officer from whom the supplies 
came. 

The property is now in his hands ; he is charged with it, and 
held responsible for it ; and his next duty is to put down each item 
in his u property book," stating how each item came into his pos- 
session, whether issued by so and so, turned over by so and so, 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 303 

purchased or found. In the U. S. Army a distinction is drawn 
between "expendable" articles, chiefly drugs and dressings, and 
articles of permanent usefulness. At the supply depot one class 
is charged in an officer's account in red ink, and the other in black. 
He is not required to put down expendable articles in his property 
book, simply signing a receipt as a voucher for the officer issuing 
them. At every permanent post hospital an annual statement of 
the amounts of various articles on hand is required. 

The next question is, " How does all this property pass out of 
the officer's hands, and how is he released from further responsi- 
bility for it?" As I have said, some articles may be expended, 
that is, used up in the daily work ; others may be lost or broken ; 
others may be condemned by an inspector and ordered to be sold. 
Forms are provided for separating all such occurrences. But the 
commonest way of disposing of property is by " turning over" to 
some other officer. In this case blanks are filled out in duplicate 
of articles turned over by A to B, by order of C (A had also better 
keep a copy for his files) , and sent to B with the articles. B returns 
a receipt for the same, in duplicate, and keeps a copy himself. 
He then notes the articles in his property book as turned over by 
A on such a date. 

Every six months he must make a report of property in his pos- 
session. He begins with his account as it stood at the end of the 
last six months, puts down every article received or disposed of 
since then, giving in every case the manner of receipt or disposal, 
sums it up, and forwards a copy, keeping the original in the property 
book. With this he forwards copies of all invoices of articles 
either received or turned over by him, and also of receipts from 
other officers for articles turned over to them. 

In all cases where papers are made out in duplicate, one copy 
should be marked original and the other duplicate. 

So much for property. The remaining papers pertain chiefly to 
strictly professional matters. 

The first of these is the morning sick report, which is the 
summing-up of the several company reports. Our custom of hold- 
ing sick call before breakfast, and making out the report at once, 
is very inconvenient, as it results in everything being done in a 
hurry, and obliges the officer who makes it out to breakfast alone 
after the rest of the mess have finished. 

Every man who appears in the sick reports should also be put 
down in the register of patients, with diagnosis, dates of falling 
sick and of recovery, and final disposition of case. 

Once a month there is copied from this book and forwarded a 
list of completed cases, through medical channels. Once a month 



304: ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

a sanitary report is forwarded. Any epidemic outbreak calls for a 
special report. After every battle a special list of wounded must 
be sent. Every recruit examined must be properly recorded ; every 
patient transferred to another hospital must be so recorded on the 
books, and must be accompanied by a proper transfer slip. In 
Massachusetts any accident or serious occurrence must be at once 
reported, in duplicate, on the emergency report. Sometimes a 
record of the weather is ordered to be kept. If funds for any pur- 
pose are put in an officer's hands, he must account for them very 
carefully. 

All this seems at first a tremendous mass of wearisome detail ; 
but one gradually learns, first, that Uncle Sam insists that these 
things shall be done in just his way, and no other ; and, second, 
that his way is apt to be the easiest in the end, and, indeed, the 
only way in which one can acquit himself of responsibility and be 
square with the authorities. 

At a certain stage of his progress one is apt to get the idea that 
government cares little what he does with his patients, so long as 
he reports them nicely ; but later he will change his mind, especially 
if the inspecting officer is wide awake. 

Finally, let me advise every officer to keep in his files and letter- 
press or copy book either originals or copies of practically every- 
thing official that passes through his hands. Some day some one 
of them may prove of very great value to him. 

In 1898 one great trouble of the volunteer medical officer was 
his inability to find out just what government wanted him to do, 
how it wanted him to do it, and what equipment it meant him to 
have. In my own case, no inspector came near me, and I received 
not a word of instructions for over three months. If General 
Blood had not helped me, the regiment and I might have fared 
badly. It seems to me that a small book of "Instructions for 
medical officers " should be issued, telling concisely their duties 
under various circumstances, how to go about them, and what 
equipment is proper. Its weight in gold would have been a very 
conservative estimate of the worth of such a book to me in the 
summer of 1898. 



The Duties of Medical Officers on the March. 

By Maj. Thomas L. Jenkins, Surgeon, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

The duties and labors of medical officers on the march may be 
so far modified, by properly preparing the men and officers, by 
inspection, instruction and cautions before the march, is begun, 
that I shall say something of measures to be taken before the troops 
are moved. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 305 

The chief medical officer should inspect all food issued for 
rations ; should frequently inspect the process of cooking ; should 
insure proper watchfulness in the covering and care of food ; should 
see that cooking utensils are kept clean ; should see that a sufficient 
amount of water is boiled for the men, for drinking purposes and 
for filling canteens ; and should insist that none but boiled water 
is drunk by all members of the command. Men's clothing should 
be inspected, to see that each man has a sufficient quantity and in 
sufficiently good condition to afford him proper protection for the 
probable tour of duty away from supplies. Perhaps the most 
important inspection is that of the men's naked bodies. This 
measure was carried out weekly in at least one regiment during 
the Spanish war, and was, I believe, responsible for great improve- 
ment in the health of the men. By this means dirty men may be 
detected and made to keep clean ; sore feet, leg ulcers and vari- 
cosities discovered and ordered treated ; and those men who are 
more or less half sick, but who avoid the hospital, as many do, 
will be put in the way to get better, instead of going on to serious 
illness. 

Men should be inspected by daylight, naked, in their tents, a 
tent's crew at a time. The men and officers should be cautioned 
against sleeping on the ground in any and all climates and local- 
ities, and should be told to avail themselves of all possible means 
for raising their couches, i.e., grass, leaves, hay, poles, fence rails, 
evergreen boughs, etc. 

Company commanders — and this is very important — should 
be instructed in camp and bivouac, hygiene and sanitation. Tem- 
porary sinks or stooling places should be far from water supplies 
and cooking places, and should be frequently covered with earth, 
always covered deeply upon leaving bivouac or camp. 

Suppose, then, that, by a little extra work in preparation, troops 
are about to march, properly clothed, rationed with wholesome 
food and prepared by a few instructions and cautions to refrain 
from plunging into or inviting sickness, — we will consider the 
medical officers' duties with the moving troops. 

First, as to position on the march. The medical officers, and, 
in fact, the whole medical department, march in the rear of the 
regiment. To these officers is given the duty of sweeping up 
stragglers, giving aid to the sick of these, and, if necessary, trans- 
portation in the ambulances, sending back into the ranks the 
malingerers and the lazy. 

Directly in the rear of the regiment ride the medical officers, 
next them the hospital stewards, then the hospital corps or litter 
bearers, then the ambulances, then the hospital transportation. 
When the march is made under very trying circumstances, like 



306 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

extreme heat, great exposure, or when the men are weakened by 
fatigue, hunger or sickness, details of litter bearers may follow 
battalions, instead of being concentrated behind the regiment. 
The chief medical officer should confer frequently with the com- 
manding officer as to halts, to breathe the men, to avoid exhaus- 
tion, and to give opportunity to fill canteens. 

The medical officer's voice should be raised in the matter of camp 
or bivouac site, and certain requisites should, where possible, be 
insisted upon. The site should be on high land, remote from 
swamps, near an adequate and pure water supply, and near a sup- 
ply of wood for cooking and warming purposes. In winter, the 
site, if possible, should be chosen under the south side of a hill or 
other wind-break, — always for hygienic reasons, in the open, and 
not under woods. The water supply should be at once placed under 
guard, and points, if on a stream, indicated, — first and highest 
for water for drinking and cooking for the men ; second, and lower 
down, watering places for animals ; third, and below the others, 
washing places. Temporary sinks or stooling places should be 
located under guard as far away from the water supply and cook- 
ing places as the limits of the bivouac will allow. Any man found 
using, for relief, other places than those indicated, should be ar- 
rested and punished. Fires for boiling drinking water should be 
started immediately upon pitching camp, and no man may drink 
unboiled water, under penalty. Upon leaving bivouac, all fseces 
and refuse should be covered with earth and the camp site policed, 
and all dry refuse burned and fires extinguished. 

On marches in hot climates or on very hot days, unless great 
haste is called for, a halt of four or five hours in the heat of the 
day, marching early in the morning and late in the afternoon, will 
cover more distance and leave the men in better condition than 
marching straight through the day. Morning sick call on the 
march is just as important, even more important, than in camp, 
and should not be slurred over. 

Medical officers, bearing in mind that horror of all armies, ty- 
phoid fever, should suspect every possible case presented to them, 
and should carefully examine for this disease. Suspicious cases 
should be isolated, and, if not improving at once, sent to the field 
or permanent hospital. Men likely to be sick for only a day or 
two may be sent to the ambulances, and thus tided over until they 
are again fit for duty. Of the temporary or slighter ailments to 
which infantrymen are most subject, perhaps the most common is 
sore feet. By cautions and instructions on the care of the feet this 
trouble can be largely prevented. Immediately stomach and bowel 
troubles appear among the men, — and they are bound to do so, — 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 307 

the regular ration is as so much poison to the victim ; so that the 
wise medical officer lays in, before the march begins, a quantity of 
food stuffs like condensed milk, the various milk and grain invalid 
foods, extract of beef, etc. No man who seems likely to be sick 
more than twenty-four or forty-eight hours should be kept with the 
command, but should at once be sent to the field hospital. He 
can then be cared for properly, and will not be a drag or hindrance 
upon the marching column. 

Marching in the enemy's country, the regiment may be used as 
an advance guard. There the junior medical officer would go for- 
ward, accompanied by a quarter of the number of the litter bearers, 
with the extreme advance ; the next in rank, with a quarter of the 
number of litter bearers, will go forward with the support ; and 
the senior, with one-half of the number of litter bearers and the 
ambulances and the hospital transportation, remains with the 
reserve. 

In marching to give battle, the position of the junior medical 
officer is just in the rear of the firing line, where he gives first as- 
sistance to the wounded, tickets them and sends them back to the 
dressing station, in charge of the next in rank. This station is 
established in a protected spot, as close to the firing line as pos- 
sible, out of the line of fire, near water and a road, if possible. 
Here wounds can be dressed, some of the victims being returned 
to the firing line, others too severely wounded to return to duty 
being sent back in litters to the senior medical officer at the next 
station. This station, also out of the line of fire, near water and 
a road, marks, or should mark, the nearest point to the firing line 
approachable by the ambulances. Here a fire can be lighted and 
water boiled, instruments laid out and a sort of regimental hospital 
established. Here necessary operations can be performed, cases 
can be thorougnly examined, and diagnosis slips so modified as to 
give the patients proper care and treatment on the way to the field 
hospital. 

It is presumed that the emergency packets of gauze and bandages 
have been issued to the men previous to engaging in battle, and it 
devolves upon the medical officers to instruct the men in the use of 
these and in the matter of cleanliness in the first handling of wounds. 
Men should be instructed as to the cutting away of clothing about 
the wound, the necessity of keeping the fingers out of wounds, and 
the proper order in which to apply the dressings. 

While the duties of medical officers on the march might be con- 
strued to have nothing to do with the work in camp, I would like 
to say a word, in conclusion, concerning the medical officers' duty 
in preventing crowding.in camps and bivouac. As a sample of bad 



308 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

crowding, I may instance the brigade camps at South Framingham. 
Where a sufficient amount of ground is available, the company 
streets should be three times as long as at the State camp, men's 
tents proportionately farther apart, and the streets three or four 
times as wide. By thus spreading out, a sufficient amount of fresh 
air is insured and men are much healthier. 

Medical officers should be careful to see that no injustice is done 
any applicant for relief from suffering. I believe it is better to be 
deceived by almost any number of malingerers, than to be unjust to 
one suffering man. 



Management of a Field Hospital. 

By Maj. John P. Lombard, Surgeon, Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

In the field hospital the sick and wounded receive their first 
thorough treatment. The size of the hospital is dependent upon 
the number of troops in the command, and should be established 
on dry ground, near a good supply of wood and water, in the rear, 
in the immediate neighborhood of the regimental camps. It is 
formed by two or three hospital tents pitched end on to each other 
as pavilion wards, or of four or five tents, two or three end on to 
each other at each end of an intervening fly, the latter inserted to 
break the continuity of the wall and thus to promote ventilation. 
The pavilions can be arranged in various ways, according to the 
configuration of the area available as a site. The pavilions should 
be separated from each other by a space equal to twice their width, 
a distance which is necessary to give restful quiet to the inmates, 
free ventilation and good policing, and to lessen the danger from 
fire. A small pavilion conveniently located will answer the duty 
as an office and dispensary. A surgical ward should be connected 
with an operating tent, suitably fitted for antiseptic work. Bath 
tubs should be provided, to insure a cleanly condition of the patient 
before admission to the wards, and for the subsequent treatment 
of the cases requiring them. There should be a special ward for 
venereal cases, and isolation wards for cases of infectious and 
contagious diseases, also a suitable tent for dining place for 
convalescents. 

A hospital may be kept in campaigning condition, that is, the 
tents neither framed nor floored. If for any reason, such as an 
epidemic, the location would be occupied for some time, the tents 
should be supplied with wooden floors. Tents should not be 
occupied by more than six patients. Kitchen should be in rear, 
with sufficient apparatus for boiling water, and well supplied with 
good cooks. Sinks should be far enough removed to the rear from 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 309 

hospital, and cared for with that strict attention which their im- 
portance demands. 

The surgeon in charge of a field hospital is responsible for the 
care of the sick and wounded on the march and in camp, and for 
the comfort and general welfare of the wounded when brought to 
the hospital by the ambulance service. He should direct the 
unpacking of the wagons for the establishment of so much of the 
hospital as may be necessary, and the subsequent repacking when 
the march is to be resumed. He should superintend the admission, 
return to duty or transfer to base hospitals of his patients. 

As commanding officer of the hospital corps detachment, he 
should keep the accounts of the enlisted men on duty at the hos- 
pital. He should make timely requisition for medicines, medical 
and hospital stores, supplies and property, for the care, expendi- 
ture and use of which he is held responsible. He should supply 
regimental and other medical officers of the command with such 
articles as may be required and are available for the treatment of 
the sick. He should send a daily report of sick and wounded and 
of the hospital corps to the chief surgeon, with a statement of the 
hospital fund. After an engagement he should forward lists of 
wounded, and on sending patients to base hospitals he should fur- 
nish transfer lists to the senior surgeon accompanying them. 

Medical officers may be assigned to assist him in the manage- 
ment of the hospital. One of these should act as executive 
officer, aiding the surgeon in charge in the work of supervision, 
and having special charge of the records. Another should super- 
intend the cooking and diet of the hospital, drawing rations from 
the subsistence department, and issuing them for use and keeping 
the accounts of the hospital fund. He should also have special 
charge of the hospital stores, and of such articles of property as 
are connected with the cooking and serving of food. Others 
should be assigned as attending surgeons, to care for the sick on 
the march and in camp, and during an engagement to look after 
the management of the wards, and to make notes of operative 
procedures, deaths, and of the progress of cases for subsequent 
report to the surgeon in charge, and entry on the records of the 
hospital. 

Care of Sinks. 

By Maj. Oeorge Westgatb Mills, Surgeon, First Battalion Cavalry, Second Brigade, 

M. V. M. 

The ordinary camp sinks are usually long trenches, about eight 
feet deep and two feet wide, with the excavated earth piled up on 
one side, whence a part of it can readily be thrown over the daily 



310 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

accumulations. On the other side a crotched stick is driven into 
the ground at each end, and a pole laid across, to serve as a seat. 
The whole is surrounded by a thick-set hedge of brushwood, through 
which admission is given by an oblique or valvular entrance. 
Where possible, a small shed is erected over each sink, to protect 
the men during inclement weather. Nine inches of clean earth are 
daily thrown into the sinks, — about three inches morning, noon 
and night. When the trenches are filled to within two or three 
feet of the surface, a layer of charcoal, copperas, chloride of lime 
or other disinfectant is thrown in, the trenches filled up entirely 
with earth, and new ones dug. 

The sinks in use at the State camp grounds in Massachusetts 
consist of brick trenches or vaults, covered by small frame build- 
ings with trap doors at the back. Inside is found the box seat or 
horizontal bar. The floors are cemented. A solution of copperas, 
air-slaked lime and fresh earth are thrown into the vaults daily. 

Where there is a choice of ground, sinks should be placed in 
such a position that the prevailing winds will not carry odors over 
the company areas. The sink should at all times be free from any 
offensive smell. 

Small sinks for each company are better than three or four of 
large size for the regiment. 

It may be found advisable to post a guard before the entrance 
of each sink, whose duty it shall be to inspect its condition fre- 
quently, in order that all neglects of propriety or cleanliness may 
be fixed at once upon the guilty party. 

The angles of the building and the area must be kept from being 
contaminated by the urinary excretion. The floors and seats must 
be kept cleanly, and free from dirt of any kind. 

When human excreta are stored at any depth over a few inches, 
they ferment, and large quantities of nitrogen become soluble and 
volatile in the form of ammonia. This gas forms very rapidly in 
the presence of a limited amount of moisture and a somewhat 
elevated temperature. The urine is its principal source. When- 
ever this odor is detected, means should immediately be taken to 
4 'fix" or absorb it. Substances used for this purpose are green 
copperas, gypsum or land plaster and sulphate of magnesia. These 
materials should be sprinkled daily over the accumulations in the 
vaults. While the foregoing substances retain the ammonia, they 
do not prevent fermentation. If we wish to accomplish both of 
these ends, the following substances, when mixed with the excreta, 
act in this double way : sulphate of magnesia and double sulphate 
of potash and magnesia. Charcoal, peat and dry loam are also 
fixers, and to an extent preservatives. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 311 

By the frequent removal of the contents of the vaults, and the 
continuous employment of disinfecting materials, we not only 
prevent the offensive odors consequent upon putrefaction, but check 
the development or destroy outright the germs of disease that may 
gain access to them. By the routine use of disinfectants, the 
development of all germ life is checked. The cheapest and probably 
the most practical disinfectant for the contents of the vaults is milk 
of lime, or fluid " whitewash." It is made in these proportions : 
by slaking one quart of finely divided, freshly burned lime in one 
quart of water, after which three quarts of water are added and 
the mass thoroughly stirred. It should always be freshly prepared 
and thoroughly stirred before being applied. Add to the vault 
about two quarts of milk of lime daily for each individual using 
the sink. Sulphate of iron is highly recommended for the suppres- 
sion of offensive odors. The liberal sprinkling of chloride of lime 
in powder over the mass in a vault not only serves to disinfect, 
but to check putrefactive odors as well. 

It is always advisable to disinfect thoroughly all infected matters, 
such as typhoid, dysenteric and cholera stools, before they are 
emptied into the vault. The general police detail attends to the 
condition of the sinks. 

At the close of an encampment the trenches should be filled up 
with earth, disinfectants having been first thrown in, as described. 



First Aid on the Firing Line. 

By Capt. Henry D. Chadwick, Assistant Surgeon, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

The first efforts to practise asepsis in military surgery were made 
during the Russo-Turkish war. Observations made at that time 
by competent surgeons laid the foundation for the modern treat- 
ment of gun-shot wounds. Two things were clearly brought out 
in that war, viz., the value of a first aid antiseptic dressing in the 
prevention of wound infection, and the importance of immediate 
immobilization of gun-shot fractures. The then too common prac- 
tice of searching for and extracting bullets was strongly condemned. 
Since then the value of antiseptic and aseptic precautions has been 
demonstrated in Servia, Bulgaria, Chili, Greece, Turkey and Japan ; 
in the engagements between the British, Italian and French troops 
and the natives of their colonial possessions ; and, lastly, during 
our recent Spanish war. This limited experience has shown that 
even the imperfect aseptic precautions which are applicable in 
the field have done much in saving the lives and limbs of the 
wounded soldiers. Perfect asepsis on the battlefield is out of the 



312 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 

question for the future, as it has been in the past; but the effort 
should be made to approach as near to that ideal condition as cir- 
cumstances will permit. 

The small-calibre bullet inflicts wounds which are particularly well 
adapted to successful treatment by a primary acclusive dressing. 

The many difficulties of transporting medical supplies met with 
in active warfare make it necessary to restrict the material for first- 
aid dressing to the smallest amount and to its simplest form com- 
patible with the immediate demands of the principles of asepsis. 

A first-aid package, to be of practical utility, must be small in 
bulk and its use easily understood. If too bulky to carry conven- 
iently, it will be thrown away at the first opportunity. The one 
issued by our government during the Spanish war contained 2 anti- 
septic compresses of sublimated gauze in oiled paper, 1 antiseptic 
sublimated cambric bandage with safety pin and 1 triangular Es- 
morch bandage with safety pin, with directions for use. These 
packages were somewhat bulky, and there was no place in the uni- 
form in which they could be conveniently carried. The German 
army first-aid package contains a sublimated gauze bandage 5 
meters long, 2 compresses of same material and 1 safety pin, the 
whole wrapped in a compact form in waterproof linen cloth ; this 
is then sewed into the skirt of the uniform. The English army 
package contains the following : within an outer fine linen cover 
is a thin waterproof cambric cover, which is rendered air-tight by 
having cemented edges ; both covers can be readily opened. The 
inner cover contains 2 safety pins, 1 piece of waterproof cambric, 

12 by 6 inches, and this encloses a gauze bandage 4 J yards long, 
folded flat into a package 4 by 2 J inches ; a piece of gauze 17 by 

13 inches, also folded flat, and about 160 grains compressed flax 
charpie, between layers of gauze. These are all made antiseptic 
by impregnating them with HgCl 2 1-1000. Weight of package, 2 
ounces. This is also to be sewed into the skirt of the jacket. 

No definite conclusions have been reached as to the best place 
for the soldier to carry this package on his person. The helmet, 
knapsack, the cartridge box, a hollow place in the butt of the gun, 
the uniform at a place over the heart and in the skirt, have all 
been recommended as the most convenient place to carry the pack- 
age in active campaigning. As officers and non-combatants are 
without guns, some place in the uniform must be found which will 
be convenient and still not conflict with military requirements. It 
must be in some part of the soldier's outfit which will not be likely 
to be thrown away during a forced march or in the heat of battle. 
The cartridge or sword belt is about the last thing a soldier will 
part with, and therefore it has been suggested that the first-aid 
package be sewed upon the inner side of the middle of the belt, at 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 313 

the back. To be worn in this way, it must be well protected by 
an outer wrapper of oiled linen cloth or thin leather that will resist 
the wear, and so prevent the enclosed material from being con- 
taminated. 

The first-aid package must meet the following requirements : — 

1. The material used must not only be aseptic but antiseptic, as 
it is to be used upon fresh wounds which have not been made 
sterile. Unless this be done, the growth of the bacteria which are 
probably present will go on in the usual way, while, if a reliable 
antiseptic is used, bacterial growth will be hindered if not pre- 
vented. The antiseptic used must be non-volatile, and resist 
chemical changes for a long time. A mixture of powdered boric 
and salicylic acids seems to meet this requirement better than any 
other suggested. 

2. The package must contain some fixation material which will 
prevent displacement of the dressing after it has been applied ; 
two strips of adhesive plaster, one inch wide and eight inches long, 
meet this requirement. 

3. The dressing employed must not be covered with any imper- 
vious material that will prevent evaporation of the secretions, and 
so cause maceration of the skin and prevent the dry crust from 
forming over the wound, which is nature's way of hermetically 
sealing the opening. Every soldier must be taught the danger of 
hand contact, and also that the wound is probably cleaner in a 
surgical sense than any water he may find with which to wash it. 
The dressing can be applied by any one of ordinary intelligence, 
without touching the wound, if he has had a little instruction ; and 
each man should be taught how, as the value of first-aid dressings 
depends upon their prompt application as soon as possible after 
the wound occurs, and to meet this requirement on the battlefield 
the men must apply their own dressings in the large majority of 
cases. Time should not be taken to remove much clothing while 
the wounded man is on the firing line, but the wound should be 
exposed and covered with the protective dressing held in place by 
adhesive plaster strips attached to the skin, and then the bandage 
may be applied over the clothing and dressing. A gun-shot 
fracture of the extremities, in addition to the dressing, must also 
be immobilized by some extemporized splint, to prepare the patient 
for transportation. A first-aid package, containing 2 pieces of 
sublimated gauze ; 1 gauze bandage ; 2 pieces of adhesive plaster ; 
an envelope of antiseptic powder ; a triangular bandage, if it can 
be compressed into a small bulk ; and these enclosed in a durable 
impervious covering, which can be sewed on the belt, would seem 
to meet all the conditions which a first-aid package is meant to 
serve. 



314 ADJUTANT GEJSTEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



The Ideal Type of Medical Officer. 

By Capt. F. P. T. Logan, Assistant Surgeon, Eighth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

Man in all ages, classes of society and walks of life has cherished 
a type, each in his own sphere, which he has hoped to attain. 
Education and ambition seek to accomplish and are aids to that 
end, yet a natural fitness is deemed more than anything else, since 
ideals are born, not made. 

Many strive, yet in misdirected channels, and hence so few reach 
the ideal state. We may see every day many unsuccessful men of 
our own fraternity, as well as in other lines, who, had they spent 
the same amount of time and energy in another branch, would have 
achieved renown even. In fact, our successful men are greatly in 
the minority. Even among us are there not some who, even though 
successful practitioners, feel that, had a different choice been made, 
they might more nearly have reached that ideal state ? 

So, too, while many of us are clever indeed as physicians, yet 
we may not make efficient medical officers. Can anyone say what 
is lacking, — what the ideal type of medical officer is? I feel it 
quite beyond me to say, hence I will make but a brief venture. 

As we well know, most varied are the requirements of the medi- 
cal officer in the regular service. He may be detailed to some 
small post on the western plains, as scientist on some expedition, 
instructor in a university, or made governor of a province. One 
can readily see there is no limit to his possibilities. So, too, in 
the militia, our men should be able to meet such requirements, and 
I have no doubt there are many that are. He must have a basal 
knowledge, ambitious and intellectual qualifications, by which, 
when occasion requires, he may be able to do efficiently any branch 
of his work that he may be called upon or detailed to do. I will 
not say that an officer must be well grounded in the tactics of all 
the branches of the service, but yet a sufficient working knowledge 
of the administration and the movements of troops is advisable. 

Primarily, he is of good moral, physical and intellectual qualities, 
of fine character and most conscientious. He at all times considers 
the health of the troops as taking precedence over every other thing. 
He realizes that his mission is to treat the sick, and he knows how 
best to administer to their health and comfort. He knows the 
hygiene and sanitation of camps thoroughly, and how best to main- 
tain the standard under all conditions. He understands the ad- 
ministration as well as the paper work of his department. He 
thoroughly understands his duties while with troops, in camp on 
the march, or at the firing line. He can construct and equip a 
hospital at short notice, and arrange its management. He can 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 315 

regulate the rations of the men and their clothing, adapting them 
to varying conditions of weather and climate. By nature he is 
kind, charitable and sympathetic. He commands the respect of 
officers and men alike. Withal, a gentleman, a student and an 
all-round good fellow. 



Knowledge of First Aid required by Officers and Men. 

By Capt. James E. McGourty, Assistant Surgeon, Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

The object of this paper is not to make surgeons of the officers 
and men, but to teach presence of mind, how to give the right kind 
of aid in cases of accident and other emergency, until the surgeon 
arrives. The need of such instruction is shown by the mistakes 
which people make in caring for the injured in cases of dangerous 
bleeding, of fainting, burns and broken bones. 

Emergency knowledge, what to do in case of accident or sudden 
sickness, before the surgeon arrives, may be summarized thus : — 

First. -^ For wounds and bleeding, uses of bandages and im- 
provised tourniquet. 

Second. — For fractures, dislocations, etc., burns and scalds, 
uses of improvised splints. 

Third. — For unconsciousness, such as fits, drunkenness, apo- 
plexy, drowning and suffocation, sunstroke and fainting. 

Fourth. — Poisoning and antidotes; removing of foreign sub- 
stances from the eye, ear and nose ; frost bites ; for wounds and 
hemorrhage. 

Wounds should be handled as little as possible, so as to favor 
blood-clot. In case of severe bleeding, pressure on the artery that 
has been cut will successfully stop the hemorrhage. This pressure 
may be brought about in different ways, as by pressing with the 
finger on the artery that has been cut, or by using an improvised 
tourniquet. This tourniquet may be made with a common hand- 
kerchief, with a knot tied in the middle, a strip torn from the shirt 
sleeve, or a suspender, with a suitable knot in it. Either one of 
these may be loosely tied around the limb above the wound, and 
the slack taken up by twisting with a stick or with bayonet until 
the knot, which is kept over the blood vessel, exerts enough 
pressure to prevent the passage of blood through it. 

Fractures : In instances of suspected fracture or dislocation, the 
first thing to be done is to make the sufferer as comfortable as 
possible. The injured part should be placed in a comfortable 
position, and as well supported as possible, with aid of splints to 
prevent any spasmodic contraction of the muscles. Emergency 
splints can be made from any stiff material at hand ; for instance, 



316 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

a musket with the butt placed under the arm and the barrel strapped 
to the body and leg. This makes a very good splint in cases of 
fractures of the leg or thigh, keeping the body perfectly immovable. 
Padded splints may be made by means of cloths folded, or sleeves 
filled with leaves or straw. A scabbard may also be used for the 
arm or leg splint. The emergency bandage, or triangular bandage, 
now much in use, forms a very important part of an emergency 
outfit. 

Burns and scalds : Be careful in removing the clothing not to 
tear the cuticle from the body, but rather to cut around that part, 
even if some of the clothing is left. Exclude air from the burn as 
much as possible. Dust flour on the burn or rub lard if obtainable. 

Unconsciousness : The emergency treatment is to make the suf- 
ferer as comfortable as possible, by loosening the clothes, to keep 
him from hurting himself, and to treat the symptoms as they arise. 
The history of the case many times will enable one to distinguish 
the cause of the unconsciousness. Odor of breath and flushed 
features will enable one to distinguish drunkenness. The pulse 
will help to tell the man's condition. Give the sufferer plenty of 
air, favor respiration and circulation. In cases of fainting, place 
in a reclining position, with feet higher than the head. In case of 
sunstroke, place the sufferer in the shade, remove clothing and 
bathe with cold water, place ice on the head ; then the body should 
be rubbed rapidly. In case of a fit, protect the sufferer as much 
as possible from injuring himself. Loosen the clothing and place 
some object between the teeth, to prevent him from biting the 
tongue. 

Drowning : Favor artificial respiration as much as possible. Two 
methods are usually employed for the purpose, — first, Silvester 
method : This consists in placing the sufferer on his back, and, by 
pulling his tongue forward, to favor the passage of air into the 
trachea ; and then drawing the arms away from the sides of the 
body and upwards, so as to meet over the head. The arms are 
then brought down to the sides, and the elbows are made to almost 
meet at the pit of the stomach. These movements constitute an 
act of respiration, and should be continued at the rate of about 
sixteen to the minute. Second method : Place the sufferer flat on 
his face, then gentle pressure is made on the back ; the pressure 
removed, the body turned on its side ; the body is then turned 
back again on the face, gentle pressure again used to the back, 
then turned on the side again. This should be done about sixteen 
times in a minute. Give stimulants as soon as returning vitality 
permits. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Eo. 7. 317 

Poisoning : Cause evacuation of stomach as soon as possible, by 
placing finger in the throat ; give warm water, and repeat. 

Frost bites : Thaw out parts gradually by rubbing with snow or 
cold water. 



Suggestions relative to the Increased Value of the Medical 
Department, M. V. M. 

By First Lieut. Hugh Caeot, Assistant Surgeon, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

Our experience in the recent war with Spain, and likewise the 
English experiences in South Africa, have brought out two impor- 
tant points, which seem worthy of consideration : — 

First. — That the mortality from disease is about five times that 
from wounds received in action. 

Second. — That the mortality among regular troops is markedly 
less than that among the volunteers. 

The great mortality from disease calls our attention to the fact 
that military surgery of the present, and probably of the future, 
will be largely of a preventive type, and that much can be done in 
times of peace to mitigate the terrible mortality of war ; but it is 
with the fact that the mortality among the volunteer forces is 
greater than that among the regulars that we are chiefly concerned. 

It is not probable that we shall ever bring the mortality among 
the volunteers below that of the regulars, but I believe that a 
careful consideration of the causes of this discrepancy may lead to 
a great improvement in the conditions of the volunteer forces. 
The chief reason for the notably better conditions existing in the 
regular army is the greater experience of the men ; and, while we 
cannot give the volunteer the field experience of the regular, we 
can do something, by a careful and systematic instruction, to 
render his position a less unfortunate one. In order that the 
volunteer may better resist the causes of disease, it is essential 
that he should know from what sources they come, and how 
they may be avoided in practice; and it is not upon the field 
officers, nor yet upon the company commanders, that this work of 
instruction must fall, but upon the officers of the medical depart- 
ment. They alone can thoroughly understand the varying forces 
which determine the final issue, and, while their work may be 
greatly decreased by previous instruction of company and field 
officers, yet much of their work must necessarily be done among 
the men themselves. 

Such instruction might, to my mind, wisely be made to cover in 
general the following ground : — 



318 ADJUTANT GEKEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

1. Selection of food and water, and the part played by these 
constituents in the causation of disease. 

2. Selection of camps. 

3. Importance of insects in conveying disease. 

4. Influences of changes of temperature and moisture upon the 
liability to disease. 

5. Amount and nature of clothing and foot gear to be used in 
different climates and at different altitudes. 

Under the selection of food and water, instruction might be 
given in the form of lectures by medical officers to the men, either 
by companies, or possibly by larger units. It is probable that by 
far the most important cause of disease is polluted drinking water, 
and I would urge the importance of constant and thorough-going 
instruction of both officers and men in the theory and practice of 
the careful selection and constant guarding of water supplies. I 
feel sure that it will be found far easier to enforce regulations in 
regard to these matters among men who thoroughly understand 
why such regulations are necessary, than among men who hold the 
present popular though essentially mythical beliefs on the subject. 
In connection with advice as regards choice of food, personal 
instruction as to methods of preparing food in the field might also 
be given. I believe that this instruction might have a double 
influence for good, in so far as it would not only instruct the men 
themselves, but, as they are representative citizens, would insure 
the dissemination of much useful knowledge throughout the com- 
munity. 

In regard to the selection of camps, it is of less importance that 
the private should understand the theory and practice of this detail 
of the service ; but it is of the first importance that the field and 
line officers should be thoroughly conversant with the reasons 
which make one locality preferable to another ; and, if possible, 
actual examination of country, with a view to camping sites, should 
be given as a means of instruction. Perhaps, also, the theory of 
such selection might wisely be explained to members of the non- 
commissioned staff. 

The recent developments in regard to the conveyance of disease 
— notably, malaria and yellow fever — by mosquitoes, and possibly 
also by other insects, make it of the first importance that both 
officers and men should understand and appreciate the large part 
played by these insects in the causation of disease. We are not 
even now in a position to be dogmatic in regard to the exact im- 
portance of the part played by mosquitoes, but I venture to say 
that no officer here has any doubt that they are by far the most 
important etiological factor. The localities inhabited by these 
winged pests vary very much in different climates ; but I believe 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 319 

that an intelligent attempt to avoid low ground and grass and the 
universal distribution and judicious use of netting would markedly 
decrease the number of cases of disease. 

At the present time, many rather hazy and somewhat mythical 
beliefs exist in regard to the relation between damp ground and 
the actual occurrence of intestinal disorders. That such a causa- 
tive relation does exist is true, but it is probable that a more 
rational understanding of these relations would lead to a more 
intelligent and more effective avoidance of these dangers. 

A part, at least, of the sickness of the volunteer troops in the 
Santiago campaign was due to a very imperfect understanding on 
the part of the men — and to some extent also on the part of the 
officers — of the importance of carrying clothing not necessary for 
immediate use. In many cases, clothing absolutely essential to 
the well-being of the troops was abandoned during the day from a 
lack of realization of its importance during the night. It may be 
questioned, also, whether the equipment of forces was suitable for 
campaigning in that climate at that season of the year ; and it 
seems to me by no means improper that such subjects should be 
considered and discussed by the medical officers, and that certain 
more or less fundamental facts might wisely be formulated for the 
information of both officers and men. This work might wisely be 
extended so as to give a general working knowledge of the prin- 
ciples upon which clothing for use in different climates should be 
selected ; and, while at the present time our attention is naturally 
called to conditions existing in tropical countries, the fact that we 
may, and probably shall be, more likely to use our knowledge in 
temperate climates should not be lost sight of. I have been par- 
ticularly impressed with the very imperfect understanding on the 
part of the men of the importance of proper selection of foot gear 
and the routine care of their feet; and I venture to sa} 7 that, 
if they were subjected to the severe test of continued marching, 
the medical staff would feel that they had been mistaken for a col- 
lection of chiropodists. The lack of care results from the lack of 
knowledge, and this may, I think, be wisely supplied by the med- 
ical department. 

The outline thus given of a possible course of instruction is in- 
tended merely as a suggestion, and there are many officers here 
present who are far better qualified than I to show how such instruc- 
tion may be made efficient, and in how far it will be of positive 
value. At the same time, I hope that these suggestions may arouse 
a general interest and provoke general discussion, for in this way 
only shall we get the benefit of many ideas accumulated by the 
medical department while in the service ; and, if I have succeeded 
in arousing interest, my paper has served its mission. 



320 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



Sword and Bayonet Wounds. 

By First Lieut. Charles 8. Butler, Assistant Surgeon, Eighth Regiment Infantry, 

M. V. M. 

Ever since the invention of firearms, and the adoption of such 
weapons by armies of civilized nations, wounds produced in war, 
on the one hand, by bullets and projectiles of one kind or another, 
have been increasing in number ; but wounds produced, on the 
other hand, by side arms, swords and bayonets, have been decreas- 
ing in number, in proportion to all injuries. Side-arm wounds, in 
this century, have been rare occurrences, and the disproportion 
has been so great that a study of wounds in war to-day has become 
almost exclusively one of gun-shot injuries. There are, neverthe- 
less, occasions when sword and bayonet wounds are more frequent ; 
occasions when the sabre, the lance and the bayonet are important 
weapons of defence, as well as of offence ; and such times are in 
repulsing the "rush" of savage or uncivilized races, more partic- 
ularly of Egypt, of India or Turkey, as well as in riots nearer 
home. 

As illustrating this difference, this disproportion, it may be of 
interest to point out a few examples. Including the wars of the 
latter half of this century, the wounds inflicted by side arms are 
but 2 to 3 per cent, of all wounds.* Again, of all wounded men 
treated in the war of the rebellion, 1861-65, over 246,000 in all, 
only 0.37 per cent, (or 922) received sword or bayonet wounds. f 
And again, in the Franco-German war of 1870-71, of 54,268 
wounded, only 1.4 per cent, were from sword and bayonet.]: 
These are suggestive figures ; but it is well also to bear in mind 
that a large proportion of such injuries were received, not in actual 
battle, but by accidents in personal disputes and brawls in camp, 
and from sentinels in the discharge of their duty. 

A soldier's attitude in battle exposes his left side more to the 
enemy, so this portion of his body is the more frequently wounded. 
Of course such wounds are more particularly received in repelling 
the "rush" of savages, or in receiving the "shock" in cavalry 
charges ; and under these circumstances the head, side*of the neck 
and upper extremity are more usually injured. These wounds, 
however, at least in warfare between civilized nations, are seldom 
of great severity, except in cases of head injury ; yet even here 
the amount of force necessary to fracture the skull is far greater 
than at first seems probable, for such fractures are ordinarily the 

* Delorme : " Traite" de Cheringee de Guerre." 

f Otis: "Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion." 

+ Fischer: " Statistics of War of 1870-71." 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 321 

result of blows on the top of the calvaria, and consequently allow 
a glancing blow. The great damage, done rarely, the extensive 
slicing of the tissues, even to removing clean-cut portions of the 
skull or cutting off an arm, is the result either of very great force 
added to the momentum of a man charging on horse-back, or of 
the use of the keen-edged sword or " knife" of Asiatic savages. 

Sword wounds may be divided into incised and punctured 
wounds ; bayonet wounds are punctured wounds. The usual 
results, however, of sword cuts are contused incisions, along with 
more or less laceration of the soft tissues, due to the dull edge of 
the weapon ; they are, in fact, very similar to injuries met with in 
civil practice ; they consequently need little comment now, and 
their interest and importance lie in their rarity, except in campaigns 
against savage or half-civilized enemies. 

In regard to punctured wounds, those produced by the bayonet, 
the lance or the sword thrusts, since the use of firearms, the one 
fact to be noted is their infrequency, compared to all other injuries. 
The one great danger from this class of wounds is the liability to 
inflammation and suppuration ; so their importance lies particularly 
in the depth they go and the organs injured. Because engagements 
will open at greater ranges than ever before, because modern fire- 
arms are far more effective and accurate, there will be fewer oppor- 
tunities and less necessity for the use in battle of the bayonet. 
Although it is not obsolete, its use will be limited rather to 
sentinel duty, to storming buildings and in riots, to giving con- 
fidence to those armed with it, and, rarely, to assaulting redoubts 
and meeting the attack of cavalry or the " rush " of savages. 

Incised sword wounds of the scalp, face and neck have been 
usually of little importance ; Otis, in the " Surgical History of the 
War of the Rebellion," records only 324, with 7 deaths. A man 
is able to protect his face and neck, and severe injuries, therefore, 
are uncommon. Because such wounds are like the frequent scalp 
and face wounds of civil life, they have, for the military surgeon, 
but little interest. There is, however, this principle to guide us, 
that sabre wounds on top of the skull are not as fatal as those on 
the sides and frontal region. 

Incised fractures of the skull are rare, but their mortality is 
considerable ; of 49 instances given by Otis, 13 died. Such in- 
juries may present extensive fracturing of the vault of the skull, 
and are then commonly fatal ; while, if the sharp-edged weapon 
were used, there may be the clean-cut fracture, even in more than 
one place. 

Punctured wounds of the scalp, face and neck are very rare ; 
such are most frequently the result of quarrels, brawls, or are 



322 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

inflicted by sentinels. One case is reported by Otis, and the 
photograph shows the skull with a rounded perforation near the 
parietal eminence, due to the energetic sentinel, when a drunken 
soldier refused to obey. In all the war of the rebellion there were 
only 6 cases of punctured fracture of the cranium, and of these, 5 
died. 

An important point touching these head injuries is to be borne 
in mind : fracture of the inner table of the skull without fracture 
of the outer table does occur ; and, when both tables are fractured, 
the injury to the inner one is always more extensive than that to 
the outer. In case of the smallest dent in the outer, the inner 
table may be badly fractured and displaced. 

Sword and bayonet wounds of the chest are also uncommon in 
warfare ; 86 such cases occurred among the Germans in 1870-71 ; 
and in the war of the rebellion, 1861-65, there were recorded by 
Otis 38 cases out of over 20,000 wounds of the chest. As is to be 
expected, penetrating wounds of the chest are extremely grave 
injuries, the death rate being high (65 per cent.). 

Incised wounds of the abdominal wall, produced by sabres, and 
punctured wounds, produced by bayonets, were not uncommon 
in the war of the rebellion ; here, again, they were mostly received 
in quarrels, and were not generally of a serious nature. But, 
aside from these instances, such injuries are infrequent in battle. 
They are, moreover, particularly liable to inflammation and sup- 
puration, and so are of importance. Penetrating bayonet wounds 
of the abdomen, of the peritoneal cavity, are very rare, — 9 only 
in 1861-65 ; but such have an extremely high mortality, the rate 
actually being over 90 per cent, in wars previous to the Boer and 
Spanish wars. 

Incised and punctured wounds of the lower extremities are more 
usual than of other parts of the body ; yet such have little interest 
for the military surgeon, except in the rare cases of injury to the 
large vessels of the thigh. Bayonet wounds of the femoral vessels 
are lacerated and punctured, thus preventing the contraction and 
retraction of the walls. In these cases, death, from hemorrhage 
is usual. In the four years, 1861-65, Otis records in all 176 
bayonet wounds of the lower extremities, and of these, 62 were 
received in quarrels. 

In a consideration of the treatment of these wounds, the prin- 
ciples of antisepsis and asepsis are of the greatest importance. 
The clean-cut incised wounds from sharp swords are to be treated 
on the lines laid down for any surgical operation in civil life ; after 
being thoroughly cleaned antiseptically, the hemorrhage being con- 
trolled, the edges should be accurately approximated and closed 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — JSTo. 7. 323 

with sterile suture material, such as p. w. g. or horsehair. It is, 
moreover, necessary to approximate the cut portions of muscles, 
suture-served tendons and nerves, as well as put any broken bones 
in good position. "Wounds of different regions require slightly 
modified methods. Incised wounds of the scalp do better if the 
hair is shaved about the field of operation ; wounds of the extrem- 
ities should be bandaged with consideration for proper circulation 
to continue ; and particular care should be taken to insure rest for 
the injured part. If there is a severe sabre wound of the arm, a 
splint for immobilization and a sling for support are to be applied. 
In war, more than in civil life, rest does much to aid the kindly 
healing of wounds by first intention. 

One other point in the general treatment of sword wounds : 
frequently the result of blows by dull sabres, in civilized warfare, 
is contusion and laceration of the soft tissues. In such cases the 
bruising may be so great that sloughing of the skin or of the deeper 
structures follows, and healing is long delayed, from granulations. 
The proper treatment for such original injuries is to trim away this 
bruised, this dangerous portion, and allow, in the dressing and 
bandaging, for swelling and drainage. 

Punctured wounds from thrusts of side arms and bayonets are 
particularly liable to infection, and consequent suppuration. Great 
care should therefore be taken to insure thorough disinfection and 
irrigation along the whole tract of the wound, to the bottom. To 
do this, it may be necessary to enlarge the original opening and 
then to follow the usual method for cleaning and disinfecting ; on 
the field, with plenty of water fit for surgical uses, moist antiseptic 
dressings will probably be safeguards ; but under the most favor- 
able circumstances, when wounds can be watched and the surgeon 
is sure of asepsis, dry dressings will be best. 



Treatment of Modern Gun-shot Wounds. 

By First Lieut. J. A. Cronin, Assistant Surgeon, Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

General Remarks on the Gun-shot Wounds of 1898 and 1899. 
— Of the 4,919 men injured by gun shot during the years 1898 and 
1899, 586 were killed and 4,333 were wounded and received into 
the field and other hospitals. The killed constituted 11.9 per cent. 
of those struck; the wounded, 88.1 per cent.; in other words, 
1 man was killed for every 7.4 wounded. The Mauser bullet must 
therefore be regarded as less deadly than the larger missile used 
during the civil war. Tne medical and surgical history of the civil 
war shows the following casualties : — 



324 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

Killed. Wounded. 

United States troops, 59,860 280,040 

Confederate troops, 51,425 227,871 



Total, 111,285 507,911 

In percentage the casualties were : killed, 17.97 ; wounded, 
82.03, — or 1 man killed to every 4.56 wounded. The relative 
proportion of killed was therefore considerably larger during the 
civil war than during our recent experiences. It is to be noted 
also that many of the wounds of the past two years were made by 
missiles of larger calibre. Of those reported in 1899, 471 were 
specially stated as having been caused by the Remington bullet 
of calibre .45. It is safe to say that, had the whole number of 
wounds received been inflicted by the smaller Mauser or Krag- 
Jorgensen bullet, the percentage of immediately fatal wounds 
would have been materially lessened. 

The less deadly character of the injuries inflicted by the modern 
bullet is manifested also when we exclude the killed and regard 
only those wounds which came under the care of the surgeons. Of 
these, during the two years there were 4,333, and 259 of the 
patients, or 6 per cent, of the whole number, died. The corre- 
sponding percentage from the records of the civil war was 14.3. 
Table C in Part I. of the medical volume of the " Medical and 
Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion " shows that among 
the white troops of the army there were borne on the reports of 
sick and wounded 230,018 gun-shot wounds, of which 32,907, or 
14.3 per cent., proved fatal. The marked reduction of the ratio 
of killed to wounded may be placed to the credit of the small-calibre 
bullet ; but the lessened mortality among the cases which came 
into hospital may not be attributed wholly to the humane character 
of the wounds inflicted by this missile. Due credit must be given 
to the improved surgical methods of the present day. 

Wounds of any region of the body may be taken in comparison, 
and the result will always be found to show a decided lessening in 
the percentage of cases ending fatally among those of the past two 
years, as compared with those of the civil war. Take, for instance, 
gun-shot wounds of the femur. During the civil war surgeons in 
the field hospitals regarded a fractured femur as a serious menace 
to life, the danger from which was believed to be materially lessened 
by an immediate amputation. The field hospital surgical work 
after a battle consisted in great part of amputations, excisions and 
resections. Of 6,576 fractures of the femur, 2,923 cases were 
treated by primary amputation, 186 by resection and the remaining 
3,467 by conservative or expectant measures, — this conservative 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 325 

action being due in many cases to a want of favorable conditions 
for the performance of primary operations. The limb was promptly 
amputated in 44.4 per cent, of these gun-shot fractures. On the 
other hand, during the past two years 82 cases of gun-shot fracture 
of the femur were reported, 6 of which were treated by primary 
amputation and 2 by resection, the remaining 74 cases being treated 
by conservative methods, — not because the conditions were not 
favorable for the performance of primary operations, but because 
of a conviction that under present methods of treatment the limb 
could be preserved without adding materially to the danger to life. 
The limb was lost through surgical intervention in only 7.3 per 
cent, of the cases. 

Not only limbs, but lives, were saved by the surgical practice of 
the past two years. In the 82 gun-shot fractures of the femur, 
the upper third was involved in 32, of which 5 were fatal ; the 
middle third in 27, of which 3 were fatal ; and the lower third in 
23, of which 1 was fatal. The mortality varied from 4.3 per cent, 
of the cases in which the lower third was fractured to 15.6 per 
cent, of the cases in which the upper third was the site of the 
injury ; whereas the corresponding percentages of fatal cases during 
the civil war were respectively 42.8 and 49.7. The whole of the 
lessened mortality in these serious fractures may be credited to the 
protection given to the wound by the first-aid dressing and to 
the care exercised in the subsequent aseptic treatment of the 
fractured limb. 

In penetrating wounds of the thorax, the rate of mortality fell 
from 62.6 per cent, during the civil war to 27.8 per cent, during 
the years 1898 and 1899. The civil war reports show 8,403 cases 
in which the results were determined ; 5,260 deaths occurred among 
the number. The reports for the later years, as already stated, 
show 198 cases, of which 55 were fatal. 

There were during the civil war 3,475 penetrating wounds of the 
abdomen, in which the ultimate results were determined ; 3,031 of 
these, or 87.2 per cent, of the total, proved fatal. During the 
years 1898 and 1899, 116 cases, 81 fatal, were recorded, the fatal 
cases constituting 70 per cent, of the total. Of 10 cases in which 
laparotomy was performed, 9 were fatal. 

The alteration in the percentages of mortality in fractures of the 
cranium is less marked than in wounds of other parts of the body. 
Of 4,243 cases of cranial fracture during the civil war, 2,514, or 
59.2 per cent, were fatal. In 1898 and 1899, 68 cases were 
recorded, with 37 deaths, the latter forming 54.4 per cent, of the 
whole number. 

About three weeks ago I read an article in that once famous 



326 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

paper, the New York "Sun," where the editor dilated somewhat 
on the report of the surgeon general concerning the modern gun- 
shot wound. When news arrived that I was to ponder on that 
subject, I immediately wrote to the surgeon general, asking for the 
report, and also to the " Sun," requesting their editorial, unfortu- 
nately losing the one I previously had. The surgeon general was 
kind enough to send me an extract from his report, but the " Sun's " 
folk still retain my stamps. The extract which I now read does 
not pertain to the treatment, but rather gives the result of the 
treatment, of the modern gun-shot wounds. The full report of the 
surgeon general will be completed by the first of the year, and can 
be had for the asking. 

Now, as to the treatment of the modern gun-shot wounds. I 
did not have the distinguished pleasure of accompanying my regi- 
ment to the front in the late war, so I cannot give you any per- 
sonal observation on gun-shot wounds. In fact, if I remember 
aright, I never had experience with them, other than that variety 
found in out-patient department and private practice, usually about 
July 4. The treatment in general appears similar to that of years 
ago, excepting that our advance in surgery and in antiseptics aids 
us considerably. The cases that present themselves nowadays are 
not as serious as during the rebellion, for the reason that the small- 
calibre bullet, with its steel jacket, its density and velocity, 
causes far less destruction than the older Remington. We have 
less laceration of soft parts, less hemorrhage, less tearing of nerves 
and less comminution of bones. 

As regards the treatment in general, I shall begin at the head 
and continue down. In the wounds where the cerebrum is con- 
cerned, we must employ, as the surgeon general advises, conserv- 
atism. With the old bullets the comminution was great ; with the 
modern one, not marked. The tissues of the brain are so delicate 
that they permit but little tampering with. Little probing should 
be done ; small spiculse of bone should be carefully removed ; any 
foreign substance, such as dirt, hair and particles of caps, should 
be gently removed ; the scalp about the wound cleaned, and a con- 
servative action followed. After observation, should you find signs 
of abscess, trephine, and treat as an abscess elsewhere. 

Next come wounds of face. Usually they are not serious, as 
the vast blood supply and the absence of vital organs permit a 
good result from the routine treatment of gun-shot wounds. In 
the neck the great arteries and the larynx are of serious thought 
when injured, and oedema or closure of the glottis must be watched. 

In injuries of the chest we can expect some consolation if the 
heart, the large vessels, the thoracic duct are not penetrated. In 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Eo. 7. 327 

injuries of the abdomen I feel that, with the thirty feet of intestines 
and the field for a perforation, the best treatment is an explorative 
laparotomy, even though there be no perforation, as our modern 
treatment certainly permits such action. 

As to injuries to bone, that is, fractures, etc., they are treated as 
the ordinary wounds to bone, i.e., cleanliness and the application 
of the general principles of surgery. 

In closing, I feel that the treatment is the same as thirty years 
ago, adding antiseptic surgery. 



Glanders. 

By First Lieut. Austin Peters, Veterinary Surgeon, First Battalion Cavalry, M. V. M. 

I have chosen as a topic glanders and farcy, as it seems to me 
that it ought to be of special interest to military surgeons, because 
of its not only being a contagious disease of the horse and other 
solipeds, but on account of its communicability, under favorable 
conditions, to man. 

Glanders is a specific communicable disease peculiar to the 
equine family, due to a micro-organism known as the bacillus 
malleus ; it is a somewhat thicker and shorter rod than the tubercle 
bacillus, and is readily cultivated on potato, where it forms round, 
brownish colonies. It is capable of producing in the horse two 
forms of disease, known as glanders and farcy, and in advanced 
stages it is not uncommon to see an animal showing evidences of 
both. 

It can further be divided into two varieties of each, — an acute 
and a chronic ; that is, there is acute and chronic glanders, and 
acute and chronic farcy. The classification of this disease into 
glanders and farcy depends upon its clinical manifestations, the 
cause being the same in either case. A horse with glanders might 
give another farcy, and vice versa. 

The symptoms of glanders are often obscure, and it is frequently 
difficult to diagnose, but a typical case is easily detected. A 
typical case of glanders has three well-marked symptoms : a dis- 
charge from the nose, chancres on the septum nasi and enlarged 
sub-maxillary glands. This discharge is of a dirty, gluey char- 
acter, with a tendency to adhere around the nasal opening, often 
having bits of hay, oats or hay seed sticking to it ; and occasionally 
it may be streaked with blood, if the chancres are sufficiently de 
veloped to produce hemorrhage. 

The ulcers upon the septum nasi are of a chancrous character, 
appearing as small, distinct points, at first slightly raised, break- 



328 ADJUTANT GEISTEEAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 

ing down in the centre, leaving a pit with well-defined edges. In 
some cases they spread and run together, forming large ulcerating 
surfaces two or three inches in diameter, destroying the mucous 
membrane and invading the cartilage, sometimes eating a hole 
through the septum from one nasal passage to the other. In 
chronic cases there may be a tendency toward recovery, the ulcers 
endeavoring to heal, and forming cicatrices, sometimes of a stellate 
character. Upon post-mortem the turbinated bones may also be 
found to be covered with similar ulcers. The lymphatic glands in 
the inter-maxillary space are enlarged, usually not painful upon 
pressure, and said to be more or less adherent to the bone. This 
is not necessarily the case ; in recent developments they may be 
slightly painful, and may be somewhat movable. Rarely they 
may fluctuate, and break and discharge a purulent material, but are 
usually hard, and may be as large as a hen's egg. 

The acute and chronic forms vary in degree chiefly : an animal 
with acute glanders may develop the disease rapidly, and die in 
two or three weeks ; while one with the chronic form may appear 
to be in quite good condition, keeping sleek and in good flesh, 
doing his work as usual, and may live for several months or even 
years, perhaps giving the acute form to others, which may succumb 
some time before he does. Whether an animal develops an acute 
or chronic form depends upon the work required, hygienic surround- 
ings, its individual resisting power and the virulence of the germ. 

Farcy may also be either acute or chronic. The symptoms here 
are a corded and enlarged condition of the lymphatic vessels, 
usually of the limbs, and generally one hind limb, more especially 
the near one. Along the line of the lymphatic vessels little nodules 
may be felt, called " farcy buds," these in time fluctuate, break 
and discharge a serous or sero-purulent fluid, having a tendency to 
dry, forming yellowish crusts, under which are ulcers of an un- 
healthy character, which may or may not have a tendency to heal, 
depending somewhat upon whether the case is of an acute or chronic 
character. If these sores heal, new buds are apt to form near 
them and break and form ulcers. It is not unusual in cases of 
farcy to find small tubercular tumors on other parts of the animal, 
upon the sides of the neck or the sides of the body. 

A peculiarity of glanders, already referred to in connection with 
farcy, is the tendency of the lesions to appear upon the left side. 
In farcy it is either the near hind or near fore leg that most 
frequently presents evidence of disease, and in glanders eight times 
out of ten the discharge from the nostril, the chancres and the 
enlarged sub-maxillary gland are upon the near side. The reason 
for this I do not know, but that it is a fact I am sure from an 
extensive personal experience. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 329 

The symptoms of glanders and farcy detailed above are those to 
be met with in cases that can be readily diagnosed on a physical 
examination, but many obscure cases are met with which are by no 
means so clear. Upon post-mortem examination of horses killed 
because of glanders, nearly always tubercles are found in the lungs, 
and perhaps the tubercular formations due to the bacillus malleus 
in the mediastinal or bronchial lymphatic glands ; and these forma- 
tions not infrequently appear to be older than the lesions which 
caused the clinical signs of disease which led to the horse's de- 
struction. That is, I believe glanders may sometimes be primarily 
a lung disease, and that a horse may be a source of danger before 
the presence of disease is suspected. Many instances could be 
given, if time permitted, where case after case of glanders has 
appeared in stables, and the disease has only subsided after killing 
some old horse with a chronic cough, which upon post-mortem 
showed glanders tubercles in the lungs, and yet never any external 
manifestation of disease. There may be a slight discharge from 
one nostril, with a very slightly enlarged sub-maxillary gland, and 
no chancres in sight ; or a sore on the leg of an unhealthy char- 
acter ; and yet the evidences of disease may not be sufficient for a 
positive diagnosis. 

These cases are obscure, and there are various methods of diag- 
nosis. An old-fashioned means is to give the suspected animal a 
powerful cathartic ; its depleting influence causes the disease to 
rapidly assume an acute form, and the necessary diagnostic symp- 
toms speedily appear. 

Another method of great value, and much resorted to, is the 
guinea pig test. A swab on a wire in a sterilized-cotton-plugged 
test tube is used to collect the discharge from the nose or from a 
sore. This material is mixed with a little sterilized water, and 
injected with a hypodermic syringe intra-peritoneally in a male 
guinea pig. In two or three days the testicles commence to en- 
large, become immovable, hot and painful ; and when the scrotum 
is opened upon post-mortem a deposit of a whitish, slimy character 
is found upon them, from which pure cultures of the glanders 
bacillus may readily be obtained. This is a diagnostic method of 
great exactness and value ; it frequently decides doubtful cases 
which would require a long time to develop, and saves many mis- 
takes and delays. 

Mallein is another diagnostic means. It is a product of the 
glanders bacillus, prepared in much the same way that tuberculin 
is prepared from the tubercle bacillus, and is said to give a some- 
what similar reaction. When injected hypodermically in a horse's 
neck, in eight or ten hours it produces a marked rise in tempera- 
ture, rigors, and a large, hot, painful circumscribed swelling at the 



330 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

point of injection. It does not, however, seem to be as certain a 
diagnostic for glanders in horses as tuberculin is for tuberculosis 
in cattle. It does, however, I think, have a curative effect on some 
cases in the earlier stages. 

Glanders among horses is very prevalent in Massachusetts. 
During the past year between seven hundred and eight hundred 
cases have been killed in this State. It is a source of great loss 
to horse owners and a danger to the public health, three or four 
cases in human beings having been called to my attention through 
my connection with the Cattle Commission. Two cases occurred 
at Fitchburg, the men being father and son. The horse from 
which they were supposed to have contracted the disease was let 
by the father to one of the Sixth Regiment staff, and ridden by 
him during the tour of duty in June. A few days after the animal 
had returned home it appeared to be sick ; a veterinarian was 
called, who treated the mare, but did not diagnose glanders ; in 
about ten days she died. The veterinarian was not satisfied as to 
what ailed the mare ; he therefore made an autopsy, and found 
she had glanders ; but it was one of the obscure cases already 
spoken of, where the typical external lesions had not developed 
sufficiently for him to make a diagnosis during life. Soon after, 
the owner and his son were taken sick ; the elder man lived two 
weeks and the younger one between three and four weeks. The 
physicians were at first puzzled as to the nature of the disease, 
until the veterinarian saw one of them and told him of the result 
of his autopsy on the mare. This mare undoubtedly had glanders 
when taken to camp, but in the latent and unrecognizable form, 
which was probably developed into an acute character by the 
change of work and diet incident to the tour of duty at Framing- 
ham, as three other horses with glanders belonging to the same 
owner were killed by order of the Cattle Commission after learning 
of this case, none of which had been away from Fitchburg. 

Another case of glanders in man occurred recently. A hostler 
employed in a livery stable in Milford died at the Framingham 
hospital, having been sent there with an eruptive disease supposed 
to be small-pox. He was admitted to the hospital the last day of 
October, and lived about two weeks. Guinea pigs inoculated with 
material from this case by the pathologist of the Cattle Commission, 
and also at the laboratory of the Boston Board of Health, developed 
glanders. Investigation at the stable where the hostler worked 
revealed the fact that a horse had recently been killed there, that 
was found, upon a post-mortem examination, to have glanders. 

Last spring a man in Chelsea went to see a physician, who told 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 331 

him he had glanders ; he later went to the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, where it is said he was told he had glanders ; he then 
went home to Chelsea, where he afterward died, under the care of 
another physician ; and his death certificate is on file at the city 
hall, giving the cause of death as cancer of the throat. 

Glanders in man may be diagnosed, and has been diagnosed, 
as typhoid fever, pneumonia, pleurisy, pericarditis, inflammatory 
rheumatism, pyaemia, small-pox and cancer of the throat. It is 
not unlikely, therefore, that there may be deaths in humans due to 
this disease where a correct diagnosis is never made. All cases 
do not die ; it is said that two out of five may recover. 

In making a diagnosis on a doubtful case, the guinea pig test 
is invaluable. A history of the case, the man's occupation, for 
instance, is often of value in aiding a diagnosis. 

In time of war, glanders and farcy commit fearful ravages among 
army horses, owing to their being collected together in great num- 
bers and being placed under the most exhausting and depleting 
conditions ; hence the importance of the medical officer bearing in 
mind the possibility and danger of this dreadful malady. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Surgeon General's Office, Boston, April 16, 1901. 

Circular. 

The following papers were read before the School for Medical 
Officers, presided over by Brig. Gen. Robt. A. Blood, Surgeon 
General of Massachusetts, at the South Armory, Boston, April 16, 
1901: — 

4 ' Military Correspondence," — by Lieut. Col. Otis H. Marion, 
medical director, First Brigade, M. V. M. 

" Duties of Medical Officers," — by Lieut. Col. William H. 
Devine, medical director, Second Brigade, M. V. M. 

" Bathing for Soldiers, with Especial Reference to Facilities at 
the State Camp Ground," — by Maj. Charles C. Foster, Fifth Reg- 
iment Infantry, M. V. M. 

"Effects of Overwork, especially as applied to Troops," — by 
Maj. John F. Harvey, surgeon, First Battalion Artillery, M. V. M. 

u The Ordinary Ailments of Camp Life, and how to avoid 
Them," — by Maj. George W. Mills, surgeon, First Battalion 
Cavalry, M. V. M. 

" Precautions for the Sanitary Protection of Sources of Water 
Supply," — by Maj. Howard S. Dearing, surgeon, First Regiment 
Heavy Artillery, M. V. M. 



332 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S EEPOKT. [Jan. 

" Coffee as used by Troops, its Influences and Effects," — by 
Maj. Ernest A. Gates, surgeon, Second Regiment Infantry, 
M. V. M. 

' ' Military Etiquette for Medical Officers," — by Maj. Charles 
M. Green, surgeon, First Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 

" Typhoid Fever and its Prevention," — by Maj. George F. Dow, 
surgeon, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

"Care of Soldiers," — by Maj. J. William Voss, surgeon, 
Second Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 

" Outline of Prophylaxis and Hygiene required for Summer En- 
campment of Volunteer Militia," — by Maj. John P. Lombard, 
surgeon, Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

" The Proportion of Medical Attendants to the Fighting Force," 
— by Lieut. Com. Harry M. Cutts, surgeon, Naval Brigade, 
M. V. M. 

" Surgery of Future Wars," — by First Lieut. Arthur G. Sco- 
boria, assistant surgeon, Troop F, Cavalry, M. V. M. 

" Care and Health of Troops in Hot Weather," — by First Lieut. 
John W. Cummin, assistant surgeon, Battery A, Light Artillery, 

m. y. m. 

Robert A. Blood, 

Surgeon General. 

Military Correspondence. 

By Lieut. Col. Otis H. Marion, Medical Director, First Brigade, M. V. M. 

Military correspondence is governed by certain rules and regu- 
lations, and, like all other military duties, should be familiar to 
every officer in the service. 

A half sheet of letter paper will be used for a communication 
requiring but a single page. When more than three pages are 
required for the body of a manuscript communication, an addi- 
tional half sheet, or more if necessary, will be neatly pasted to it, 
so that the last or outer page may be left entirely blank (Army 
Regulations, 836). Letter paper will be folded in three and fools- 
cap in four equal folds, parallel with the writing. The inner or 
left edge of the sheet is the top when folded ; the left fold of the 
outer page is the first fold. The first fold will be used exclusively 
for a brief analysis of the contents of the communication, the offi- 
cer's marks, and note of enclosures (Army Regulations, 840). 

An official letter should refer to one subject only. Letters of 
transmittal will be used only when necessary, and when used must 
refer only to the matter transmitted ; none are required with rolls, 
returns or periodical reports. Telegrams will be followed by of- 
ficial copies sent by first mail. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 333 

The post-office address of an officer's station will be given in his 
official letters. Indefinite expressions of locality, which do not 
indicate where the letter was written, will not be used (Army Reg- 
ulations, 837). 

Official communications will be signed or authenticated with the 
pen, and not by stamps or fac-similes. Signatures will be plainly 
and legibly written, with the rank and regiment or corps of the 
writer annexed ; if " by order," stating by whose order (Army 
Regulations, 838). 

By virtue of commission and assignment to duty, the adjutant 
general or adjutant of any command transacts the business or cor- 
respondence of that command over his own signature ; but when 
orders or instructions of any kind are given, the authority by which 
he gives the order must be stated. 

An officer will not be designated in orders nor addressed in of- 
ficial communications by any other title than that of his actual rank 
(Army Regulations, 839). 

A letter will be properly briefed at the first office at which it is 
received and entered (Army Regulations, 841). 

Indorsements commence at the top of the second fold, and are 
numbered serially in order of dates on the successive folds, leav- 
ing room after each for office marks. Additional space for indorse- 
ments will be provided by pasting slips of paper on the under side 
of the last fold (right edge of the original paper), each slip to cor- 
respond in length and width, when attached, with the length and 
width of the original fold, and to turn back upon the last fold like 
the leaves of a book. The first fold, on which the brief is made, 
is always outside. Printed labels, by way of indorsement, will 
not be pasted on official papers. In no case will a loose wrapper 
be placed around an official paper, except as a mere covering 
(Army Regulations, 842) . 

All enclosures will be numbered, and will be given the proper 
office marks. Enclosures to the original communication are noted 
on the first fold, just below the brief. If others are added when 
an indorsement is made, their number will be noted at the foot of 
the indorsement to which they pertain, and also on the first fold 
of the original communication. To the latter notation will be 
added the number of the indorsement to which they belong, thus 
" one enclosure, — fifth indorsement." Enclosures to endorsements 
are numbered in the same series as those to the original paper, and 
the number of the indorsement to which they belong is added below. 
If few in number and not bulky, enclosures may be kept inside the 
original paper ; otherwise, they will be folded together in a wrap- 
per, marked "Enclosures." Officers through whose hands official 



334 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

papers pass will make the enclosures and slips secure when they 
are not so (Army Regulations, 843). 

Communications, whether from a subordinate to a superior or 
vice versa, will, as a rule, pass through intermediate commanders. 
In case of necessity, communication may be direct, the necessity 
therefor being stated. This rule will also govern in verbal appli- 
cations. All communications from superiors to subordinates will 
be answered through the same channel as received (Army Regu- 
lations, 845). 

Official correspondence between the heads of the different de- 
partments of the staff of any command and its commander will pass 
through the adjutant general or adjutant of the command. Com- 
munications to or from a commander and his subordinates will pass 
through the same channel. Communications, however, between a 
disbursing officer and the chief of the bureau in which he is serv- 
ing, which do not involve questions of administrative responsibility 
within the supervision of commanding officers, nor affect the official 
interests of individuals, but which relate exclusively to the routine 
of business in his department, will pass direct (Army Regulations, 
846). 

Officers who forward communications will indorse thereon their 
approval or disapproval, with remarks (Army Regulations, 848). 

Official correspondence between a commander and his junior 
will usually be conducted by the adjutant at regimental headquar- 
ters, the assistant adjutant general at brigade headquarters, the 
adjutant general at general headquarters, and written communica- 
tions are to be addressed accordingly in the ascending line of 
correspondence (Army Regulations, 675). The same rule governs 
verbal communications ; thus, a lieutenant will obtain the sanction 
of his captain before applying for indulgence to a higher commander 
(Army Regulations, 676). 

Written communications from a commander to those under his 
command may be made by his staff officer or the commander him- 
self (Army Regulations, 677). "When staff officers communicate 
the orders and instructions of their commanders, they will premise : 
" I am directed " — (Army Regulations, 678). 

Every staff officer must sign in person the communications and 
orders issued by him ; his assistants cannot sign them for him, or 
by his order. If the assistant signs them, it must be with his own 
name, by the order of the common commander of the two. An 
assistant in such cases must be a commissioned officer appointed 
or detailed for such duty (Army Regulations, 679). In signing 
an official communication, the rank and corps will follow the 
signature ; when writing another officer's name, the rank will 
precede the name (Army Regulations, 680). 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 335 

Official letters are to contain full information of all particulars 
upon the subject to which they relate, and will generally refer to 
one subject only. They will be written on letter paper, with a 
convenient margin, to be always on the left side of each page. 

Superior officers and other intermediate authorities are responsi- 
ble for the correctness of what is set forth in documents submitted 
by them. It is their duty to endeavor to adjust all matters that 
come within the scope of their authority ; and, in transmitting 
applications or correspondence to headquarters, they are invariably 
to state their concurrence, or otherwise, adding such additional 
observations, based on local knowledge, as may be necessary to 
enable the authorities to come to a final decision on the question, 
without further reference or correspondence. 

All communications on public service will be marked on the cover 
"official business;" and, except such as are sent by mail, the 
official position, and not the names of those for whom they are 
intended, is to be written on the envelope. 

Officers and soldiers are prohibited from sending communications, 
or preferring claims or requests for indulgences, redress of griev- 
ance, or any matter touching their military service, except through 
the proper military channels. Applications made in any other mode 
will not be entertained, but will be construed as a breach of mili- 
tary discipline. 

All official correspondence between the heads of the different 
departments of the staff of any command and its commander must 
pass through the adjutant general, or adjutant of the command, as 
the case may be (Army Regulations, 687). 

All the communications from the heads of staff departments to 
officers of any command must pass through the adjutant general 
and through intermediate commanders. 

All communications from a staff officer to the head of the de- 
partment must be made through his commanding officer, all inter- 
mediate commanders, and through the office of the adjutant 
general. 

A strict observance of the prescribed channel of communication 
is enjoined on the part of all officers, whether in the actual perform- 
ance of duty or not, except under special circumstances, where a 
direct reference is necessary. Any officer who on his own responsi- 
bility transmits documents otherwise than through the proper 
channel must fully explain the causes which induced him to do 
so, and at the same time forward copies for the information of 
the authority through whom they should have passed in regular 
course. 



336 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPORT. [Jan. 



Duties of Medical Officers. 

By Lieut. Col. William H. Dbvine, Medical Director, Second Brigade, M. V. M. 

There are so many subjects to be presented to-day, and the 
different branches of military medicine were so well covered in our 
last school, that I found it rather difficult on this occasion to pre- 
pare a paper that would not in some measure conflict with others. 

I have finally selected this subject, and, as near as I could judge, 
it is about the only one that will not in all probability be directly 
touched upon in other papers. 

Although papers in this school and that of last December have 
treated on almost every subject in military medicine and surgery, 
any repetition that may be found in the different papers is not a 
waste of material, by any means, as a repetition expressed by 
different persons in various ways serves to impress important facts 
upon our minds. Only the duties of medical officers, in a broad 
and general way, will be mentioned, as I find an enumeration of 
minor details would too greatly enlarge the scope of the paper. 

To commence with, we can presume that medical officers in our 
State have a thorough training in general medicine and surgery. 

One of the first duties of the military surgeon is to acquire a 
knowledge of department papers. This is essential, as a man well 
trained in surgery, a prominent specialist, for instance, would be 
a valuable aid in the field to perform major surgical operations, 
but without a knowledge of paper work he would perhaps not 
obtain the suitable supplies to perform the surgical operations, 
unless he had a knowledge of red tape. I fear that some of our 
volunteer surgeons have made light of a system which is as essential 
for the proper conduct of army work as in the routine of business. 
Red tape, properly used, aids the medical officer in his work, and 
makes it easy. An officer who does not promptly and properly 
forward papers, brings red tape into disrepute. Every experienced 
officer knows how necessary invoices, receipts, etc., are for medical 
supplies. You cannot expect the medical supply officer to furnish 
all kinds of valuable goods on the field, and take no receipt. In 
case of great urgency, common-sense should assert itself, and no 
officer worthy the name will allow red tape to cause suffering. 

So much for red tape, and I hope in the future every volunteer 
will receive thorough training in his paper work. 

After mastering his papers the military surgeon should start out 
on his career with the idea that prevention of sickness is of great 
moment. Although the study of prophylaxis is of great importance 
in other branches of medicine, it is of even greater consequence in 
military medicine. To keep men well in campaign without the 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 337 

environment for the practice of the very best modern medicine and 
surgery, is so essential for the success of an army that too much 
stress cannot be laid on the importance of preventing disease. 
With this thought in view, I would urge you to study everything 
pertaining to preventive medicine, and you will find it an invaluable 
aid to you in civil practice. 

But it behooves the medical officers, in order to prevent disease 
and make a first-class record for their organization, to do more 
than to acquire a knowledge of preventive medicine. They must 
study the means of applying their knowledge and imparting it to 
others. No rules and regulations to prevent disease can be carried 
out intelligently without the co-operation of officers and enlisted 
men. Too little attention is paid to sanitation by the line officers, 
and the policy in the future must be to instruct all officers and 
soldiers in elementary hygiene and kindred subjects. The follow- 
ing method of instruction in this line is recommended : — 

In addition to the ordinary emergency lectures, the following 
subjects should be treated by the militia surgeon : camp hygiene ; 
prevention of contagious disease, etc., embracing policing of camp ; 
personal cleanliness ; the importance of reporting venereal disease, 
to prevent its spread by drinking vessels and other means ; care of 
water supply, to prevent pollution ; bathing ; clothing ; use and 
abuse of alcohol and tobacco ; and other subjects that will readily 
suggest themselves in this connection. You will find officers and 
enlisted men eager to listen to instruction and advice on matters 
pertaining to health. 

Company bearers should receive special instruction in their 
duties, and in this connection I would refer you to General Orders, 
No. 6, paragraph 4, dated June 1, 1895. 

The responsibility of health of troops really rests with the 
medical officer. Medical officers have the entire sanitary care of 
commands to which they belong. The regimental commander is 
responsible as far as his orders affect his subordinates, who are 
accountable for the management of their respective departments. 
Under direction of the commander, the medical officer supervises 
the hygiene of his post, buildings, drainage, sewerage, amount and 
quality of water supply, etc. He should make oral or written 
suggestions to the commander for correction of any sanitary errors 
he may notice. It is safe to say that the commander will always 
co-operate with his medical officer in everything pertaining to the 
health of his command. Starting in with healthy troops, how shall 
we keep them so ? More is to be feared from disease than from 
wounds. 

Military prophylaxis embraces, in the broad sense : (1) exam- 



338 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

ination of recruits, in order to obtain individuals not susceptible 
and predisposed to disease ; (2) care and health of troops, the 
latter being subdivided into everything pertaining to health. 

The examination of recruits should not be too severe in time of 
peace. The surgeon should be careful not to reject a man free 
from organic diseases and deformity, but simply lacking in devel- 
opment, for this defect is quickly remedied by military drill and 
gymnastics. We must not forget that the militia should be a 
training school for our young men, and that many who have not a 
soldierly appearance, due to improper development, may finish the 
enlistment with all the physical qualifications. Starting with a 
sound body of men as near perfection in health as can be attained 
by careful examination, the surgeon should be ever alert to recom- 
mend for discharge men who show any weakness which unfits them 
for service. The surgeon, by making examination at sick call at 
camp, can detect cases of physical defect, and they can be weeded 
out. These men can be discharged for disability. 

From a hygienic point of view, you should consider the follow- 
ing in connection with health of troops : transportation of troops ; 
site of camp ground ; water supply ; care of quarters ; ventilation ; 
personal cleanliness ; diet ; clothing ; regulations of a soldier's 
duties ; policing ; drainage ; first aid to the injured. 

In transportation of troops, we should not forget to have a 
supply of water at each end of the car ; also to have cars properly 
heated and ventilated. The supplies for medical officers and means 
for transporting wounded men must receive careful provision. If 
regular ambulances cannot be procured, the surgeon will give the 
commanding officer prompt notice ; in such case the quartermaster 
should be ordered to provide light wagons, or wagons with springs 
and cover. 

In selecting site of camp ground, one must consider wood and 
water supply, healthful location, and roads by which supplies are 
to reach camp. There must be good natural drainage ; avoid 
marshy and malarious districts. Water should be tested. After 
a site is selected, sentinels should be placed on guard over water 
supply. 

There is no excuse for drilling men regardless of extremes in 
weather ; it is a good way to keep desirable men from entering or 
remaining in the service. In this connection, the following is 
quoted from the report of Surg. Gen. H. L. Burrell, 1894 : " While 
it is the duty of every medical officer to call the attention of his 
commanding officer to any danger that may take place from expo- 
sure of troops to the sun, yet the commanding officers should appre- 
ciate that the falling in line of a number of men calls in question 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 339 

their good judgment in handling troops. If it is necessary to hold 
reviews and ceremonies, they should be held at a suitable hour in 
the day, i.e., near sunrise or sunset, rather than in the middle of 
an afternoon of a hot summer's day. While, as a rule, the injuries 
received by men falling in line from heat or exhaustion are purely 
temporary, yet at times serious and permanent injuries result." 

Kitchens must be well ventilated and have good drainage. They 
must be inspected every day by the officer of the day and the med- 
ical officer. Ice chests, bread boards, and, in fact, everything 
coming in contact with food, must be carefully scrutinized. The 
employees in this department need most vigilant supervision. 

While learning his duties, the medical officer must not forget 
that he should acquire some knowledge of military matters. Be- 
sides etiquette, ceremonies, etc., he must understand enough about 
a soldier's duties to aid him in regulating his work. In the near 
future I hope there will be some method adopted to give a surgeon 
who has had no previous military training some instruction in mili- 
tary matters that are essential to the proper performance of his 
medical duties. He should master horsemanship at an early stage 
in his career, as it is one of the requirements which make his 
duties less arduous. 

Last, but not least, I will speak of the care of the sick. It is 
not necessary to say much on this subject, as this is the work for 
which the physician is trained ; and when he becomes a military 
surgeon he should endeavor to give the same skilful treatment to 
the soldier that he would to any patient in civil life, remembering 
that at all times he is judged as the physician, and not as the 
soldier. 



Bathing for Soldiers, with Especial Reference to Facilities 
at the State Camp Ground. 

By Maj. Charles C. Foster, Fifth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

A few weeks ago I was talking with an ex-member of my regi- 
ment, an intelligent man and a Harvard graduate, who presently 
said, " Major, if you don't mind my saying so, I thought you 
sometimes treated the men almost like children." I admitted it, 
and said that young soldiers, in mass, were much like children. 
They have a great deal to learn, do not realize its amount or its 
importance, and have to have it driven into them, in spite of them- 
selves, exactly like children in school. 

My friend was still sceptical, so I told him the following anecdote 
about bathing. One evening a captain came to me and said that 
he had in his company a man so dirty as to be offensive to his tent 



340 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 

mates. The man had been ordered to make himself decent, but 
had not done so. The captain did not wish to prefer charges, 
fearing that it would lead to more ridicule than good effect ; so I 
simply prescribed a bath, and a corporal and squad of men were 
ordered to administer it. For the next half -hour wild howls were 
heard from the direction of the bath house ; then the corporal 
came back to report. I asked him if he had got the fellow fairly 
clean, and he replied : "Yes, sir ; I think so. We washed him in 
three waters, sir." The next man who was ordered to take a bath 
promptly went and took it. 

The moral of all this is, that, no matter how good the regulations 
may be, these are of no value unless the men are followed up and 
compelled to conform to them. This implies constant watching, 
systematic inspection and insistence upon cleanliness of bath, per- 
sons and clothing. 

The United States regulations require that a man shall take a 
full bath at least once a week, besides the daily washing of face 
and hands. Underclothing should be washed at least once a week, 
and socks oftener. An old soldier who is doing steady marching 
will wash his feet and his socks every day, if he has a chance, for 
he knows that clean feet are not nearly so likely to get sore as are 
dirty ones. Between the thighs and between the buttocks are other 
places that are likely to chafe if neglected. 

You may tell the recruit all this, but he is often unwilling to 
take your word for it, and prefers to learn by experience. Yet, if 
you can teach him cleanliness just as he is taught the manual of 
arms, — as a part of his soldiering, — in time he will learn to value 
it ; and in some hard march it will make just the difference between 
his lasting through or breaking down, footsore. 

Some men dislike to wash their clothes, considering it work for 
women or Chinamen ; others are clumsy ; others simply lazy ; but 
all can learn to do it after a fashion, if they have to. The work 
may not be up to the Troy laundry standard, and flannel shirts 
may shrink pretty fast, but clothes may be made clean and sweet 
with little trouble. 

In permanent barracks the old system of tubs is everywhere 
giving way to the various forms of shower baths, the best of these 
being the diagonal shower or rain bath, first used in the German 
army. This is very effective and is economical, as to first cost, 
space, time and water. 

In this system it is comparatively easy to guard against the 
danger of transmitting disease from one bather to another ; although 
this is always less than people in general suppose, and seems to be 
most feared by the dirtiest men, who never willingly encounter it. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 341 

A towel is far more likely to transmit disease than a tub, especially 
if it is washed in cold water instead of hot, as is customary in many 
parts of the world. 

When my regiment went to Camp Meade a small swimming pond 
was made by damming a brook that ran close by. Long tables on 
which to stand wash basins were built near the shore, and this 
simple arrangement served very well through the pleasant autumn 
weather. When the regiment went to Camp Witherell for the 
winter very cold weather was encountered, and something more 
was needed. A rough masonry furnace, containing a stack of iron 
pipe, was built; this was connected with the hydrant system, and 
the water, after passing through the furnace, was led into tents 
close by where there were tubs. When there was a good fire the 
water ran scalding hot in the tents, and the steam kept them 
sufficiently warm. On a few cold nights, when the outfit was not 
carefully watched, — and some of the nights were very cold, — 
the pipes froze ; but, on the whole, the system was a success. 

I think the matter may be summed up by saying that almost 
any system will do, if the men are taught and required to use it 
systematically and to wash their clothes as well as their persons. 



Effects of Overwork, especially as applied to Troops. 

By Maj. John F. Harvey, Surgeon, First Battalion Artillery, M. V. M. 

It has been stated, by one of the successful generals in the late 
war with Spain, that " The proper time of rest and the safe amount 
of marching are as much a part of the soldier's duty and training 
as is personal courage, discipline and tactical skill on the field of 
battle." 

There are four duties which are of much importance in a soldier's 
life, from which the effects of overwork will plainly show itself : 
(1) marching to a desired destination; (2) on the firing line in 
battle; (3) on guard duty; (4) drilling on the field. 

1. Marching to a Desired Destination. — It often becomes nec- 
essary, sometimes absolutely so, for troops to make long and rapid 
marches to reach the field of battle in season to be of use ; but 
if such troops are brought on to the battle line exhausted and 
overtired, and, as a consequence, less courageous than under 
different circumstances, they would necessarily be more detrimen- 
tal than a benefit to the cause they were to fight for. Although 
the troops had marched a great distance and made remarkable 
time in order to reach the point desired, they would be compelled 
to take an obscure and unimportant position, such as the rear line, 



342 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

or perhaps even far away in the reserve, while well equipped in 
all other respects, on account of being overworked, and, in conse- 
quence of this, lacking strength and physical force necessary to 
battle courageously and successfully. It is a conceded point 
among all military men who have had experience on the battle- 
field, that men, to be courageous, persistent and successful in 
battle, must reach the field in as fresh and healthful a condition as 
possible, mentally and physically. 

It is a difficult problem to solve, and no set of rules can be 
formed for a guidance, — that the troops can march just such a 
distance, and just so fast each day, and not be overworked. 
Among military men, opinions differ very much. One of the suc- 
cessful brigade surgeons of the late war, and of much experience 
in the civil war, has said that any body of troops should be able 
to walk twenty miles or ride forty miles each day, and keep it up 
for some time. Another officer of much experience has said that 
his command had often marched twelve miles a day and quite a 
number of times marched thirty-two miles in a day. On making 
inquiry more particularly into the matter of the thirty-two miles 
per day, he said if a halt was made most of the men would drop to 
the ground at once, and be sound asleep in less than a minute, and 
when the time came for them to move, it would be almost impos- 
sible to arouse them ; and generally after such a long march it 
would be at least a week, if not longer, before the men would 
recover from such a strain. Another officer, quite as experienced, 
has said that troops should not march much if any over five miles 
per day previous to battle, as that is all that is possible to do and 
not be overworked. 

Therefore, one of the effects of marching to the point of over- 
work is that troops are less able to go into battle and fight as sol- 
diers are expected to fight ; and, unless having all the energy and 
vitality they possess at hand, battles may be lost which only for 
this detriment should be gained. 

2. On the Firing Line in Battle. — One of the effects of over- 
work of men in this duty is loss of nervous vitality and nervous 
energy to a point of either temporary insanity or collapse ; and one 
of the greatest causes of this deplorable state at this critical time 
is the lack of protection of some kind during the battle. If, how- 
ever, they are protected, even if but slightly, by a clump of trees, 
trenches or rifle pits, it is possible for the men to stay on the firing 
line along time and not become overworked or exhausted. More 
especially is this marked where refreshments of some kind, even of 
the simplest in quality, are furnished. 

3. On Guard Duty. — It may seem a strange thing to believe 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 343 

that men can be overworked and exhausted while on guard duty ; 
but it is nevertheless a fact, corroborated by officers and men in 
both the civil war of 1861 and the last war of Cuba and the Philip- 
pines. If a man is on outpost or picket duty in a strange country, 
where the enemy are active and treacherous, it is very necessary to 
relieve the guards often, or they become very much overworked 
and exhausted. It is not altogether the loss of sleep at night, but 
it is the overstraining of the nerves, in keeping up the constant 
watch and expectancy, that wears upon the vitality of the guard. 
After performing such duty, it is necessary that the guard be re- 
lieved from duty of any kind from eight to ten hours at least, in 
order to recuperate, or he is soon relegated to the hospital, unfit 
for any duty. Only as late as April, 1900, General Young in 
Northern Luzon made several requests that he be reinforced, as 
the men were becoming exhausted by the necessity of constant 
vigilance. 

4. Drilling on the Field. — This is a question on which many 
different opinions might be gathered as to the proper amount of 
drilling troops should have each day, and not become overworked. 
It is quite possible to drill men that have but recently enlisted into 
the army, and that are not habituated to the mode of living in the 
field or camp, to a point of exhaustion ; but if men are used to the 
work, and have performed it for some time, it is hardly probable 
that they can be overworked. The object in view is to get the men 
to work industriously and diligently as many hours in the day as 
possible without becoming overworked. In order that the troops 
may be able to do a sufficient amount of drilling, it is necessary 
that each man be thoroughly interested in the work. An officer 
who keeps the men interested all the time is successful, and is able 
to keep his men hard at work and for quite long periods without 
any detrimental consequences ; every order is obeyed promptly, 
sharply and exactly as given, and the entire command is proud 
and pleased to learn something ; and time passes so rapidly that 
before the men realize it they have done a long and hard day's 
work, and not become overworked in the least degree. On the 
other hand, an officer who is unable to make his men feel interested 
in their work is sure to come into camp from drill with his men 
tired, exhausted and discouraged ; and during the time of drill 
every command that is given seems to be obeyed with an exertion 
and reluctance, and the men seem to be hardly conscious of what 
they are doing ; time drags heavily, and they wish it would soon 
end, that they might be relieved. After such work as described, 
the command is not fit for anything but absolute rest. 

I might quote many officers whose assertions would coincide with 



344 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

mine in every particular, and who state that it is easy to account 
for the failure of troops sometimes where they should succeed ; viz., 
that by the lack of constant care and forethought the troops are 
many times overworked, and therefore fail to do the expected. 



The Ordinary Ailments of Camp Life, and how to avoid Them. 

By Maj George W. Mills, Surgeon, First Battalion Cavalry, M. V. M. 

The militiaman is often on the sick list with slight ailments which 
in civil life would neither deter him from attending to his daily 
occupation nor cause him to go to the added expense of medical 
advice. The diseases to which the circumstances and conditions 
of camp life render him conspicuously susceptible are mainly of 
the preventable class, and can be largely checked by attention to 
the principles of camp sanitation, by avoidance of polluted water, 
bad cooking, overcrowding and overwork, and in some degree by 
the inculcation of the principles of moral living. 

Experience has shown that within twenty-four hours after their 
arrival at the summer encampment two to three per cent, of the 
men are on the sick list. The medical record may read as follows : 
cuts, chafes, bruises, sprains, kicks, insomnia, syncope, acute 
indigestion as indicated by cramps, vomiting, diarrhoea, constipa- 
tion and headache. 

The causes predisposing to indigestion are such as the unusual 
fatigue of the march, drill and guard duty in men of sedentary 
occupations ; the loss of sleep, from the newness of their surround- 
ings, from unaccustomed noise and also from visits of self-invited 
comrades. The principal cause of acute indigestion is the change 
in the dietary, overeating, supplemented by fruits and free use of 
lemonade and other " soft drinks." 

Among the chief causes of diarrhceal diseases may be mentioned 
the use of badly-cooked, indigestible food, and the chilling of the 
body, particularly at night, while lying upon the ground. The 
avoidance of these and the habitual use of light flannel garments 
or abdominal bands may act as preventives. Diarrhoea should 
be checked at once, and its opposite, constipation, should be 
avoided by the acquirement of a regular habit, or by the aid of a 
laxative. 

The exposure to the extreme heat of the sun's rays, or overex- 
ertion in high temperature, together with imprudence in the use of 
water and continuous work without periods of rest and recupera- 
tion, are likely to induce sunstroke or allied conditions. The indi- 
vidual should have a good night's rest and arise with the sun, then 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 345 

take a quick, cool bath. The clothing should be such as both to 
protect from the heat of the sun and against chilling of the body. 
Light woollen underclothing is preferable to cotton or linen. A 
good material is a mixture of cotton and woollen, commonly known 
as merino. Work must not be excessive, nor performed in the sun 
during the hottest part of the day. Experience has shown that 
while at work a canteen of tea, not strong, containing a little lemon 
or lime juice, or even vinegar, is more desirable as a beverage than 
plain water. He should avoid cold bathing and cold drinks while 
perspiring, and avoid standing for a long time in the shade in gar- 
ments wet with perspiration. Finally, he should avoid exposing 
himself, to the cool external night air without proper protection. 

We should remember that pathological conditions of the eye are 
benefited by the use of smoked or colored glasses, also by the hous- 
ing of the individual in tents of a pale-blue or olive-green color. 
Promptly isolate those infected with purulent conjunctivitis. 

See to it that the individual men are properly instructed in the 
care of blisters, abrasions, and especially in the care of the feet, 
and that they are faithful in performance. 

Sometimes small-pox, measles or scarlet-fever break out in 
camp. Any such cases should be promptly isolated, and a guard 
placed over them. 

We should be watchful of typhoid contamination, using great 
care to isolate cases as soon as recognized, and to treat all excreta 
so that their final disposal shall not be a menace to others. Of 
chief importance is the prevention of access of flies to the dis- 
charges, for these insects have been responsible for the spread of 
this and other diseases by contaminating the food supply after 
visiting the sinks. They may spread infection through their own 
dejecta, and by material adherent to their feet and other parts. 

Avoid a polluted water supply ; boiling of water should always 
be done, as a matter of routine precaution, and the attention of 
the men should be drawn to the danger which they incur in the 
drinking of water which has not been so treated. After boiling 
the water, a guard should be put over it to protect its purity. 

Tuberculosis is one of the possible diseases that might be found 
in camp. It demands the most careful prophylaxis, to prevent its 
spread, and the discharge from the service of all persons capable 
of acting as foci. 

Frequent and thorough inspection will alone secure cleanliness. 
Inculcate personal hygiene. Urge moderation in all things, — diet, 
drink, work, exercise, dress. The diet must be chosen with care, 
and iced drinks taken in great moderation, if at all. 



346 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 



Precautions for the Sanitary Protection of Sources of 

Water Supply. 

By Maj. Howard S. D earing, Surgeon, First Regiment Heavy Artillery, M. V. M. 

In the selection of a camp it has become proverbial that the 
chief essential looked for is a " dry site, with wood, water and 
grass." Not the least among these is water, and it should be both 
plentiful and good. 

Military regulations as at present constituted leave the choice 
of a camp location entirely with the commanding officer, the medical 
officer being seldom or never consulted, unless by courtesy or by 
special detail. Thus it happens that the officer who is held respon- 
sible for the health of troops is handicapped at the very outset with 
both an unhealthf ul location and often a contaminated water supply, 
— circumstances over which he has no control. Primarily, then, 
it is claimed that the medical department should at least be con- 
sulted, and have the authority to confirm or condemn any location 
for the temporary home of troops. 

Granted that the choice of site has been made, — what can the 
surgeon do to protect the supply of drinking water ? All of us have 
seen how easy it is for the source of supply to become polluted by 
the careless or indifferent soldier. The latter, when overheated or 
suffering from thirst, will take little thought of the consequences, 
if only he can get at water of some kind. The rule of military life, 
where all is done by special regulation, is to let the responsibility 
rest on the shoulders of the officer to whom it belongs ; so the 
soldier early learns to shift all care of himself, except possibly 
such as may concern his immediate personal comfort and desire, 
to his superior officer. In other words, he allows or quietly sub- 
mits to have all his thinking done for him. 

The very first thing to be done then is to put a guard over the 
well or spring or brook, or whatever the source may be, to prevent 
contamination or pollution. 

Secondly, the location of the sinks must receive careful con- 
sideration. Here, again, in most instances the medical officer is 
seldom consulted. In general, he finds, when he reaches camp, 
the site already chosen by the officer in charge of the camping 
detail. The best spot may have been selected, and it may not. 
He will have the privilege of inspecting and reporting to the com- 
mandant his views and suggestions, and they may receive favorable 
action or be indorsed as impracticable, as seems to him best. If 
the location of sinks comes under the care of the surgeon, regard 
must be paid to the distance from the source of water supply, and, 
if possible, the direction of the strata of subsoil, so as to avoid 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 347 

percolation of the contents into the well or spring. Particular 
care must be taken that the sinks are used as intended, and that 
no deposit of fecal matter is made in the vicinity. All urinary 
discharge should be voided in the sinks, and not promiscuously or 
behind the nearest shelter. The lime barrel should be an indis- 
pensable accompaniment of every sink, and, in addition to the 
daily covering of fresh earth, there should be the layer of lime to 
facilitate the destruction of all organic matter. 

In his daily inspection of camp the medical officer should scrupu- 
lously see to it that all these details are properly carried out, and, 
if not, report the same to the officer of the day ; and, if this is not 
sufficient, should recommend that a guard be put over this part of 
the camp, to see that proper sanitary regulations are observed by 
every one. It should not matter whether the camp is one of in- 
struction or a more permanent one, or whether the site is to be 
occupied years in succession. In either case, strict and careful 
discipline should obtain. 

What has been said of the sinks as regards location also holds 
true with regard to cook houses and stables, and the general dump- 
ing ground. For all waste water proper drainage should be pro- 
vided, in such direction and at such distance that it will not menace 
the source of water supply. No refuse matter should be allowed 
to be trodden into the ground or thrown about to decay. It should 
be collected in barrels, removed to a safe distance and buried or 
burned. 

When we remember how much depends on the wholesomeness of 
the drinking water, too great emphasis cannot be laid upon this 
part of the surgeon's duty. So far in our study of precautions we 
have had to do with the more immediate dangers only. Let us now 
consider briefly some of the more remote causes of pollution, and 
the precautions to be observed. Suppose the troops to be depend- 
ing upon brook or river water for their supply ; in this instance it 
becomes necessary to take note of what pollution it is liable to all 
along its course. If it runs through a thickly settled district, vil- 
lage or town, it is bound to be the receptacle of more or less 
direct sewage. Farmhouses along its banks furnish direct source 
of pollution by drainage from barnyard, privy or cesspool. 

It has been frequently demonstrated, and proved beyond any 
reasonable doubt, that it is not safe to depend upon dilution for 
safety in use of river water, nor upon the idea of running water 
being able to purify itself, so to speak, by sedimentation, and 
exposure to light and air. It is granted that these conditions may 
and undoubtedly do help to a large extent, but yet are not suffi- 
cient, as witness many an outbreak of enteric fever which has 



348 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

been directly traceable to pollution of the river water by the drain- 
age from some house far up along the shore, where patients are 
known to have the disease. Some of us will recall the exposure 
of the city of Lowell, Mass., a few years ago, with an outbreak of 
typhoid epidemic. 

Probably no better guide can be found than the rules and regu- 
lations laid down by the Massachusetts State Board of Health for 
the sanitary protection of waters, used by the Metropolitan Water 
Board {yid. annual report for 1899), wherein it is provided that 
" no cess-pool, privy or other place for the reception, deposit or 
storage of human excrement, and no urinal, shall be located or 
maintained within fifty feet of high-water mark of any lake, pond, 
reservoir, stream, ditch, water course or other open waters used as 
a source of water supply for any city." The same proscription is 
made relative to the deposit of human excrement on the ground ; 
to house slops, sink waste, wash water or any polluted water ; to 
garbage, manure or any putrescible matter whatsoever. No pig 
sty, stable, hen house, hitching or standing place for horses is 
allowed within fifty feet of high-water mark of any tributary to 
the water supply. No interment is to be made within the same 
limitation. No manufacturing refuse or polluting liquids shall be 
allowed to find their way into the water system. No sewerage 
system is to be built or maintained in the water-shed when there 
is any possibility of contamination. No public or private hospital, 
tannery or slaughter house shall be allowed anywhere within the 
water-shed. Bathing is also forbidden, as well as fishing and ice 
cutting. 

While it may not be practicable for the militia surgeon of this 
State to observe all these rules, yet it is urged that he can at least 
become conversant with the general principles therein laid down, 
and so far as possible apply them to the protection of the water 
supply of the troops to which he may be attached. 



Coffee as used by Troops, its Influence and Effects. 

By Maj. Ernest A. Gates, Surgeon, Second Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

Coffee is the seed or berry of the coffea Arabica, an evergreen 
tree found in nearly all tropical climates. It grows to the height 
of twenty-five feet, but is kept down by pruning to the height of 
ten or twelve feet. An infusion of the green berry is used some 
in the treatment of poisoning and shock. 

Before it is roasted it contains caffeine, cafifeotannic acid and 
an alkaloid caffeariue. During the roasting process a volatile oil 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 349 

is developed, which, with other substances, termed caffeone, gives 
the coffee its agreeable aroma. The infusion affects its users in 
different ways, some tolerating large quantities, others feeling the 
influence of half a cupful. The percentage of the oil in an aver- 
age browned coffee is 11.6. An ordinary breakfast cup would 
contain 45 m. of the oil. The pure oil increases the pulse rate by 
direct cardiac stimulation in small doses. Large doses depress the 
heart's action. 

In man it excites the higher centres, and has an exhilarating 
action on the mental processes. It cannot do this without a cor- 
responding tissue destruction, therefore it cannot replace food. 
Its stimulating action is, however, beneficial when used in moder- 
ation. 

There is an essence of coffee that has been used to some extent. 
It is a highly concentrated infusion, mixed with extract of chicory 
and burned sugar, kept in air-tight bottles. This might suggest 
itself as being very convenient for the soldier. All that is required 
to make a good cup of coffee is to pour a cup of boiling water on 
a spoonful of the essence. The nomad tribes of Africa, in cross- 
ing the deserts on hostile expeditions, find that a ball of pulverized 
roasted coffee mixed with butter keeps them in strength and spirits 
during a day's march better than a meal of meat or other foods. 

According to good authorities, coffee possesses some antiseptic 
properties. This is due in part to the empyreumatic substances 
formed during the roasting process, and in part to caffeotannic 
acid. A cup of coffee left in a room remains free from bacteria 
for over a week. 

It was used in Arabia in the fifteenth century, and was intro- 
duced from Arabia in the sixteenth century. The first coffee house 
in London was opened in 1652. Some of the Eastern natives use 
the grounds to replace food. 

Coffee used in moderation assists digestion, promotes intestinal 
peristalsis, allays sense of fatigue and hunger, lessens tissue waste, 
consequently decreases the formation and excretion of urea. Used 
to excess, it disorders digestion and causes functional disturbances 
of the nervous system, shown by headache, vertigo, mental con- 
fusion and palpitation of the heart; increases secretion, blunts 
sensation, exalts reflex excitability, increases mental activity, and 
may produce insomnia and great nervous restlessness. The sleep- 
lessness that is produced sometimes by coffee is not always due to 
its stimulating effects on the brain. It may be irritation of the 
stomach, due to oily albuminoid matter, and especially the empy- 
reumatic oil, to which its flavor is due. In countries where the 
people rarely have indigestion it is not found that coffee prevents 



350 ADJUTANT GEKEKAL'S KEPOET. [Jan. 

sleep any more than tea. In America, where digestive disturbances 
are so common, sleeplessness may be due to the indigestion, and 
be exaggerated by drinking coffee, so that coffee alone is not 
responsible. It first briefly stimulates the heart and raises arterial 
tension, but soon depresses both. The wakefulness is usually 
preceded by a brief period of drowsiness. The brief stimulation 
of the intellect consequent on drinking a cup of good coffee cannot 
be obtained from an infusion of raw coffee, and is probably due to 
the volatile constituents developed in roasting. Caffeone opposes 
caffeine in its action on circulation, as it quickens the pulse and 
lowers arterial tension. 

Coffee is an important addition to diet. A man can do a greater 
amount of work with the same amount of food if he has a ration 
of coffee. It is indispensable in armies, in supplementing their 
imperfect rations and in relieving the sense of fatigue after great 
exposure and long marches. Some authorities claim that it causes 
biliousness. 

During the recent campaign coffee was issued to some extent in 
the form of the green berry. The poor appliances the soldiers had 
for roasting it made it impracticable to issue it in this form. It 
was roasted either in kettles, pails or tomato cans for about forty 
minutes. It would either be roasted too much or not enough. It 
was then pounded up by the breech of the gun or a hammer and 
put in water and boiled. Consequently the coffee would be of va- 
riable strength and its active principles would be inconstant. It 
is the custom of the native Cubans to roast it more brown than 
our average coffee. A Cuban officer visited our camp and made 
us some coffee. It was so well browned that rolling it with a 
bottle was sufficient to grind it. He then put it in a stocking and 
poured hot water on it slowly and allowed it to percolate through 
the grounds. It was the finest coffee we ever tasted, and I believe 
it should be used soon after roasting, as it loses its strength with 
age. 

Coffee in moderation, properly roasted and prepared, is an aid 
to digestion, enables the blood to take up more nourishment, is a 
mild laxative to the bowels, lessens the tissue waste, allays the 
sense of fatigue, is an antiseptic (especially against typhoid and 
malaria) . It is certainly the first thing a soldier craves after a 
long march. On the other hand, I believe it is a positive injury if 
improperly roasted and prepared. If roasted too much, it increases 
the amount of caffeotannic acid, which is a hindrance to digestion 
and is constipating. It also allows the escape of the volatile sub- 
stances on which largely depend the good effects of the coffee, 
enumerated above. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— STo. 7. 351 

According to good authority, there is no end of nervous and 
digestive troubles that may be produced by the abuse of coffee. 
Personally, I saw no ills in the soldiers in Cuba that could be 
traced to coffee. 

It might be well to remark here that the boys discovered that 
by throwing the grounds around the tent it kept away vermin, the 
land crab and tarantula. 

It is a very important part of a soldier's ration, and one which 
cannot be replaced. 



Military Etiquette for Medical Officers. 

By Maj. Chakles M. Green, Surgeon, First Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 

Some years ago, in a circle of officers, an adverse criticism was 
made in my hearing of some act of an officer not present, on a mat- 
ter pertaining to military etiquette. " Oh, well," said an officer 
of the line, " he was only a medical officer, — what would you ex- 
pect?" This remark rankled a little at the time, but I was forced 
to acknowledge to myself that the criticism was a just one ; and 
subsequent observation has shown me that not all medical officers, 
either in the United States Army or in the volunteer militia, are 
fully conversant with the etiquette, customs and discipline of the 
service. The reason is not far to seek. With few exceptions, 
medical officers enter the service from civil life, without previous 
training either in the ranks or in the line ; and, however well 
equipped professionally, they have much to learn if they would 
escape the criticism of superior officers and of their brother officers 
in the line. 

Several years ago, in company with General Forster, our late 
Surgeon General, it was my fortune to attend a meeting of the 
Association of Military Surgeons of the United States. It will be 
remembered that General Forster had the reputation of being a 
past master in matters of so-called red tape and military etiquette ; 
and I shall never forget his remarks on many things that we saw 
together. We returned home with the satisfactory consciousness 
that our brother officers of Massachusetts compared very favorably 
with others whom we had seen. 

It is not my wish to play the Chesterfield towards my comrades 
in the medical department of this Commonwealth ; but I am moved 
to allude to a few points of courtesy and etiquette, in the hope 
that it may be serviceable to us all to consider together their re- 
quirements. 

One of the first duties of a soldier is to learn how to wear his 
uniform. Medical officers are not exempt from this duty, and they 



352 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPOKT. [Jan. 

should be as punctilious in all requirements as to dress and equip- 
ment as a gentleman is in observing the conventional customs of 
dress in civil life. It may seem unnecessary to remark that parts 
of full dress uniform and equipment should not be worn with parts 
of the undress uniform, except such parts as are identical in both 
uniforms, or that no part of citizen's dress should be worn with 
either uniform ; and yet I have seen a major of the medical depart- 
ment of the United States Army walking the street in undress uni- 
form, but with a derby hat. It should be superfluous to say that 
there should be no buttons missing from the uniform, or that, ex- 
cept in the privacy of quarters, all hooks and buttons intended to 
fasten should be hooked or buttoned. Yet I have seen a brigade 
medical director of another State rise from a seat on a platform 
and address an audience, wearing his full dress uniform with coat 
half unbuttoned and without his belt. There is a wide discrepancy 
among officers in regard to the style of collars ; they should be of 
the so-called choker or standing variety, lapping slightly in front, 
and showing not more than a quarter of an inch above the coat 
collar ; the corners must not be turned over. Neckties of either 
white or black, preferably the latter, should be worn when neces- 
sary to conceal the collar button ; but no part of the tie should 
appear outside the coat. The cuffs should likewise be white, and, 
like the collar, should not show more than a quarter of an inch. 
Watch-chains should never be in sight. Low shoes should not be 
worn unless leggings conceal the fact ; and, except when mounted, 
high shoes of plain black leather should be used for dress or un- 
dress uniform. Tan-colored shoes may be worn, when so ordered, 
with the khaki uniform. Enamelled or patent leather shoes should 
be worn only on social occasions, in full dress. Except when 
mounted, gloves should be white, and may be of thread or of kid, 
dressed or undressed ; but it looks better to wear a fresh, clean 
pair of thread gloves on each occasion of ceremony than to wear a 
kid glove that is white only in name. The hair must not be worn 
too long, and, most of all, should never show beneath the vizor ; 
the beard, if worn, must be kept neatly trimmed. The hat or cap 
must be worn evenly, and never tilted upon the back of the head. 
In quarters and off duty an officer may indulge in a reasonably neg- 
ligee dress ; but it is bad form to be out of quarters bareheaded or 
in shirt sleeves. Except when permitted by special orders, author- 
ized badges and decorations should never be worn on the undress 
coat, on which only the authorized ribbons may be worn. 

Medical officers should be punctilious in returning the salutes 
of subordinates and of enlisted men and in promptly saluting 
superior officers. It is best not to attempt to bow, salute and say 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 353 

" Good morning " all at the same time. We should be particularly 
careful, too, to pay due honor to the colors. The uncased colors, 
whether in our own camp or elsewhere, are saluted by uncovering, 
except at ceremonies ; and the passing color, whether in camp or 
in the street, whether we are in uniform or not, should find us at 
attention and with uncovered heads. On official occasions, officers, 
when indoors and under arms, do not uncover, but salute with the 
sword, if drawn ; otherwise, with the hand. If not under arms, 
they uncover and stand at attention, but do not salute except when 
making or receiving reports. In greeting officers socially, it is 
customary to uncover without saluting. 

In conducting his official correspondence, a medical officer should 
use paper of letter size, never note paper; the sheet is folded in 
three equal folds, and long envelopes should be used. In military 
communications, the rank of the officer addressed should precede 
his name, and his title should follow. He may be addressed as 
" Sir," or by his rank, as " Colonel," " General," etc. In the 
naval service I believe it is customary to address an officer as 
" Sir," or by rank, and then to write his rank, name and title in 
the lower left-hand corner of the sheet. It is customary to begin 
a military communication with " I have the honor to state," or " I 
have the honor to report," etc. ; and to conclude with the words 
4 'Very respectfully, your obedient servant," writing the rank and 
title after the signature. Medical men in civil life are proverbially 
unbusinesslike and unmethodical in attending to their correspond- 
ence. It is needless to say that medical officers should be the 
personification of promptness and method. 

In walking or riding, junior officers should place themselves on 
the left of, or behind, their superiors, according to circumstances. 
If a junior officer is escorting a senior by carriage, he should open 
the carriage door, in the absence of a footman ; the senior officer 
enters first, and sits on the right hand of the rear seat. The 
junior should have had the foresight to have the carriage so stationed 
that he may enter the carriage after his senior, without having to 
pass before him ; if he has forgotten this matter, he must enter 
from the other side of the carriage. The junior will sit on the left 
of the senior, or in front of him, according to circumstances. On 
arriving at the destination, the junior will see that the carriage 
stops in such a position that the senior may alight first, without 
having to pass before the junior. Although not professedly famil- 
iar with the customs in the naval service, I believe they differ from 
the customs in the army. When several officers are disembarking, 
I believe the juniors enter the launch first and the senior officer 
last, in order that he may not be kept waiting in the boat while the 



354 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 

juniors enter. In boarding, I understand the senior is first to go 
up the gangway. An exception to this rule is made when the com- 
mander of a ship is escorting a senior on board ; the junior then 
goes on board first, in order that he may receive his senior. 

In conclusion, I may say that, after all, the customs of courtesy 
and military etiquette are synonymous with the rules for courtesy 
and good breeding in civil life. Although more formal than the 
unwritten customs of daily life, the military code of etiquette is 
none the less analogous to the instinctive customs of well-bred 
men ; and we all know that the good officer and good soldier are,, 
and always must be, true gentlemen. 



Typhoid Fever and its Prevention. 

By Maj. George F. Dow, Surgeon, Sixth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

It requires but a glance at the history of past wars to convince 
us that the worst foe with which the soldier has to contend is 
disease. For example, in our own civil war, on the Union side, 
93,969 were killed, while 186,216 died of disease ; and in the 
Spanish-American war 454 were killed, while 5,277 died of disease. 
This is true of other wars as well, for in the Crimean war there 
were but 4,602 killed, while 17,580 died of disease. 

We also find, in looking still further into this matter, that a 
large percentage of these deaths in army life is due to typhoid 
fever. Thus the death rate from typhoid during the Nile campaign 
in 1898 was 28 per cent. ; Soudan campaign, 1884-85, 39 per 
cent. ; Dongola campaign, 1896, 50 per cent. ; while in our war 
with Spain the deaths from typhoid were 86.24 per cent, of the 
total deaths. 

Typhoid fever is so widely distributed in all countries that one 
or more cases are likely to appear in any regiment within a few 
weeks after assembly. This is shown by the fact that, out of 106 
regiments in the Spanish-American war, 38 per cent, reached the 
national encampments with cases of typhoid fever already devel- 
oped ; while, twenty-eight days after arrival, 85.84 per cent, of 
the regiments had developed this disease. 

In considering the question of the dissemination of typhoid 
fever, the first thing which naturally occurs to us is infected water 
supplies. On this, however, I shall dwell but briefly, since this 
means of dissemination is so well known, and the importance of 
protection from this source has been so thoroughly investigated. 
There is no doubt but that infection from water plays an important 
part in all large camps ; but that these water supplies are often 
free from infection until polluted by the soldiers themselves is 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 355 

also true, if we may depend upon information gathered from many 
sources. 

Typhoid fever is more likely to become epidemic in camps than 
in civil life, for many reasons, the greater difficulty of disposing 
of the excretions from the human body being the great cause. In 
fact, we may say the whole question of the prevention of typhoid 
in armies is largely one of the disposition of the excretions. One 
man infected with typhoid fever may scatter the infection in every 
latrine in a regiment before the disease is recognized in him, as 
the elimination of typhoid bacilli from the bowels probably begins 
soon after infection. It is also more than probable that many 
individuals may for a while carry and eliminate the specific bacillus 
of typhoid fever without developing the disease themselves. It 
will be seen at once how necessary is the proper disposal of stools 
of both the sick and well. 

I will first present some of the means by which these infected 
excretions find their way into the alimentary canal of the soldier. 
That dust is one of the most common of these seems to be very 
clearly demonstrated. It is stated that at Jacksonville the shell 
roads through the encampment were ground into the finest dust by 
the heavy army wagons, and that the scavenger carts carrying tubs 
filled with fecal matter passed along these roads, their course often 
being traced by bits of feces which fell from the tubs. Other vehicles 
ground up the dust and fecal matter together, and the winds 
scattered the particles here and there. Men inhaled this dust, it 
was deposited on food in the mess tents by the roadside, and eaten. 

Another illustration of dissemination by this means is given by 
Dr. G. Sterling Ryerson, lieutenant colonel, Canadian army medical 
staff. Dr. Ryerson says that the epidemic of typhoid fever which 
raged at South Africa can be traced to the three months the army 
lay at the Modder River. The soil of that place is of the lightest 
character, and, having been trampled and pulverized by thousands 
of feet, it formed an impalpable powder. This, mixed with the 
excreta, was wafted in dense clouds into the men's tents, their 
mouths, food and drink. This he considers was one of the prin- 
cipal causes of infection. He also spoke of the circular dust 
storms, during which it was impossible to keep the dust out of 
the tents. 

Camp pollution, which is one of the greatest sins committed by 
soldiers in the field, furnishes another means of dissemination by 
dust. Men will not take the trouble to go one hundred or even 
fifty yards to the latrine, but urinate and defecate in the region of 
the tents. This is wafted into dust and becomes mixed with food 
and drink. 

Flies undoubtedly play a large part in the transportation of the 



356 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

typhoid bacillus, and sufficient evidence was gathered to show- 
beyond reasonable doubt that the most active agents in the spread 
of typhoid fever in many of the encampments of 1898 were flies. 
In the first place, the latrines contained fecal matter specifically 
infected with the typhoid bacillus. Flies alternately visited and 
fed upon this infected fecal matter and the food in the mess tents. 
It happened more than once that when lime had been scattered in 
the pits, flies, with their.feet covered with lime, were seen walking 
upon the food. Typhoid fever was much less frequent among 
members of messes who had their mess tents screened, than among 
those who took no such precautions. This is further proven by 
the fact that typhoid fever gradually died out in the fall of 1898, 
in the encampments at Meade and Knoxville, with the disappear- 
ance of the fly ; and this occurred at a time of the year when 
typhoid fever is generally on the increase. Dr. Ryerson also 
speaks of the part which flies took in the epidemic at South Africa. 

We next have the infection of blankets, tentage and clothing. 
Camp pollution is again responsible to a great extent for this. In 
some of the camps of the Spanish war it was quite impossible to 
walk through the woods near the camp without soiling one's feet 
with fecal matter. Much of this was probably specifically infected, 
and it was by no means improbable that the infection was carried 
by the men into their tents, where blankets and tentage became 
infected. 

It is desirable that soldiers' beds be raised from the ground ; as, 
in some of the regiments at Camp Alger which were badly infected, 
the tents were never floored, and dust several inches deep was 
found in the tents. During the day, men with feet possibly soiled 
with infected material walked around in this dust, and at night 
threw down their blankets and slept in it. When possible, the 
outer clothing should be removed at night ; for, with several men 
sleeping together in a tent, in clothing worn during the day, and 
with some of them soiled with infected fecal material, the effect 
upon the general health certainly cannot be beneficial, and the pos- 
sibility of the dissemination of infection must be admitted. 

If privates in the ranks would give more attention to personal 
cleanliness, and if they were furnished with quarters in which they 
could keep themselves clean, typhoid fever and other infectious 
diseases among troops in the field would be greatly decreased. 
The overcrowding of regiments is another evil to be avoided in 
army life, as it can readily be seen that it is much more difficult to 
enforce the laws of cleanliness where insufficient space is allowed. 

Except in cases of the most urgent military necessity, one com- 
mand should not be located upon the site recently vacated by 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 357 

another. This principle holds good even when the vacating regi- 
ment is not known to have suffered from any infectious disease. 
The danger of this was proven many times during the Spanish war. 

When a command becomes badly infected, a change of location 
is certainly necessary ; but this alone is of little value, without the 
thorough disinfection of clothing, bedding and tentage, and even 
then the command cannot altogether lose its infection, because 
some of the men will carry the germs of the disease in their bodies. 

That even an ocean voyage will not stamp out the infection was 
well illustrated by the Sixth Massachusetts Infantry in the Spanish- 
American war. This regiment was quartered on the United States 
steamship " Yale " from July 8 to July 25. It had become infected 
with typhoid fever prior to its departure from Camp Alger, owing 
to provost-marshal duty, and not less than 49 recognized cases 
occurred during the month, the majority having originated on the 
voyage from Charleston, S. C, to Guanica, P. R. These cases 
were entirely isolated, and a guard placed about the sick bay, and on 
arrival at Guanica were sent north on the transport " Lampassas." 
This, however, did not stamp out the disease, but new cases con- 
tinued to develop rapidly, until the whole regiment was infected. 

To the hospitals must be attributed another serious source of 
dissemination. First, to their lack of proper means for sterilizing 
the clothing of patients when discharged ; secondly, to the fact 
that patients are often returned to duty after mild attacks of 
typhoid which have not been recognized ; and, lastly, to the custom 
of taking men from the ranks to work in the hospitals, and allow- 
ing them to return again to their regiments. 

Again, the lack of proper food and the fatigue of hard campaign- 
ing increase the susceptibility to typhoid fever. 

In closing, I should like to emphasize the importance of early 
diagnosis, for by detecting and isolating the first cases a regiment 
may be saved from an epidemic of typhoid fever. 



Care of Soldiers. 

By Maj. J. William Voss, Surgeon, Second Corps Cadets, M. V. M. 

With the beginning of the twentieth century we find that the 
relations which exist among the various nations have not mate- 
rially changed, and it is as necessary, as in earlier ages, that an 
army and navy be maintained for self-protection. 

In this country we are not cursed with compulsory military service 
and a heavy armament, which gives some of the European countries 
the appearance of an armed camp. We have a small standing 



358 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

army of professional soldiers, which is entirely inadequate in case 
of any serious trouble, so we have to depend on the volunteer 
soldiers of the National Guard and the patriotism of the people. 
Such being the condition of affairs, it must be admitted that the 
enlisted men of our State troops should be composed of the very 
best material obtainable, so that it can be used in warfare effec- 
tively when necessity demands that it shall be called into active 
service. 

The experience of all wars has shown the general ignorance of 
the elements of sanitation not only among the men but those higher 
in authority. The high mortality of warfare is not due to the 
weapons of the enemy, but largely to influences brought into opera- 
tion by the men themselves, and therefore more or less under their 
control. 

In our late Spanish war the great mortality was not among the 
men who were at the front, but among the men who were mustered 
in summer camps, where hygienic rules could be carried out ; and 
was caused by preventable diseases brought about by camp pollu- 
tion, by excreta, and other filth by soldiers who were not acquainted 
with the elements of sanitary decency. In some places the food 
was badly cooked, and exposed to flies during the process of prep- 
aration. The water was impure, and the men were exposed to 
the stress of weather or a paludal atmosphere. It would seem 
that the American people learn very little from the experience of 
warfare. This same condition of affairs existed to a greater or 
less degree in all our previous wars. 

Now, what are we going to do about it? If we have to maintain 
an army to keep the peace, it is the duty of all intelligent com- 
munities to develop and make warfare as humane as possible. 
The importance of sanitary work cannot be overestimated, and, as 
it is clearly owing to the lack of knowledge that it is defective 
among our troops and elsewhere, it is clearly the duty of the 
medical officers to call attention to it, in order that it may not be 
any longer a reproach to our soldiers. At the present time, little 
or no instruction is given by the State to our officers and men in 
regard to the care of their health ; and, if we were suddenly called 
upon for active service in the field, and the officers and men were 
more or less thrown upon their own resources, we should undoubt- 
edly 6nd to a greater or less degree the unsanitary condition of 
affairs which existed during the^late Spanish war. This, then, is 
a lesson in preparation we have [learned from actual experience, 
and we should not forget the method of keeping our men efficient, 
and this knowledge propagated among those who have it not. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 7. 359 

The army medical officer is eminently a sanitarian ; in this re- 
spect he is superior to the civilian physician. It is his duty to 
prevent disease as much as possible by looking after hygienic 
conditions of the men and their surroundings, and his recommenda- 
tions are usually acted upon by those who are responsible for the 
sanitary condition of the camp. Frequent and thorough inspections 
will alone secure proper cleanliness of the body, clothing, within 
tents and surroundings, and is of the greatest importance, because 
voluntary action on the part of the men cannot be depended upon. 

Ruskin has spoken of soldiering as " The trade of being slain ; " 
but it can be shown that nearly two-thirds of the men that die 
succumb to diseases which are preventable ; therefore I think a 
better definition of the soldier's profession would be, the art of 
perfect sanitation, and this would require large knowledge in regard 
to the laws of health. 

Now, all this has a moral ; it only goes to show that, if we wish 
to keep our soldiers free from disease by preventing its invasion 
or by limiting its abilities, the human organism must be kept up 
to a certain standard unit of health by careful regimen and obe- 
dience to the laws of health. In this battle for health, the army 
of the citadel must not be weakened by exposure to infection, or 
by vicious habits, carelessness or debauchery. Nature, therefore, 
places in our hands abilities to overcome and encompass the dan- 
gers which surround us, and only commands that we shall cherish, 
foster and develop all of these as part of the armament with which 
we are to meet and conquer the common enemy. 

With the exception of the feet, the clothing of our soldiers is 
tolerably well adapted to its uses. They should all have their feet 
encased in comfortable well-fitting shoes, and, if necessary, made 
to individual measure, so that peculiarities of shape of feet can be 
accommodated. They should be made with broad soles, and not 
so thick as to prevent proper bending of the feet, and none of their 
movements should be interfered with. At the present time, very 
little attention is paid to the foot-dress, the men wearing whatever 
suits their fancy ; and we see all kinds of fashionable shoes, which 
aggravate and cause many painful imperfections of the feet. Boots 
ordinarily should not be worn, as they sweat the legs. As rubber 
clothing keeps the underclothing damp, by preventing proper 
evaporation from the skin, it should be worn only in wet weather. 
Many object to woollen stockings, as they are apt to keep the feet 
in a tender and offensive condition, on account of the leather in 
the shoes being a bad conductor. At the end of a long march, the 
feet should be bathed and dried before putting on dry stockings. 



360 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

The natural forces of the muscular system require to be main- 
tained by constant and regular exercise, in order to maintain their 
vigor and all the characteristics of their healthy organization. 
There can be no doubt that physical exercise has a favorable influ- 
ence upon health and longevity. Lack of exercise cannot be tol- 
erated with impunity, any more than lack of due provision of 
clothing and food. The men, then, should be instructed in the 
laws of health and exercise, and a little instruction in anatomy 
and physiology would be beneficial. 

Especial attention should be paid to the proper carriage of the 
body and methods of respiration. In walking, the head should be 
erect, the shoulders thrown back, and the whole body from the hips 
upward inclining forward. A free, swinging stride should be ac- 
quired. The lungs and heart should have ample room ; therefore 
the clothing should be loose around the upper part of the body, in 
order not to interfere with the freest expansion of the chest. 

Out-door games of all kinds should be encouraged, for if properly 
carried out, they will not only keep the men in good spirits, but 
will make them strong, healthy and vigorous. Cleanliness should 
be insisted upon, to keep the body in a healthy condition. It is 
well that a bath be taken every morning. Many of the methods 
are luxurious, but a cold sponge bath followed by friction will 
ordinarily have the desired effect. 

The health of the men will depend a great deal on the site of the 
camp. Dry ground where there is good subsoil drainage should be 
selected ; it should be somewhat protected by trees. A good water 
supply that can be used for cooking and bathing purposes should 
be in close proximity. 

The sinks should be placed at a considerable distance from the 
quarters and cook house of the men, and not in line of prevailing 
winds. They should be covered, so as to keep flies from the 
excreta, and care should be taken to have them deodorized. 

It is important that the company bearers and men of the hospital 
corps receive proper training in antiseptic surgical methods, in 
order that they may be efficient. Considerable care should be 
exercised in the selection of these men. Only those who show an 
adaptability for this work should be chosen, and our instruction 
should not be confined alone to the members of the corps, but to 
all the men, as nobody can tell at what time he may be called upon 
to act at the moment during the unavoidable absence of the surgeon. 
Besides this, it is important that some of the men receive special 
instructions in the preparation of food, the care of the sick and the 
handling of dressings and instruments. Perhaps a better way 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 361 

would be to have trained female nurses attached to our hospitals. 
They have a natural adaptability for this work, and they certainly 
exercise a moral influence over the sick which is greatly desired 
and well appreciated. Therefore, I would recommend that female 
nurses be attached to our militia, so that they may become familiar 
with the duties peculiar to this line of work. 

Our men should be fed on a simple, wholesome diet, well cooked 
and of sufficient quantity and variety to keep the functions of the 
body in activity. The cooking of food in temporary camps is often 
defective, and causes digestive troubles and malnutrition. It is 
very important that a good cook be attached to every company. 

The diseases of the respiratory system are the plague of the 
army, and especially in barracks phthisis is a prevalent and fatal 
disease. Great care should be exercised by our surgeons in select- 
ing recruits. All should be rejected who show any predisposition 
to this malady. When in doubt, reject, even though sometimes 
you may be mistaken and reject men who afterwards turn out to 
be healthy. Pneumonia, pleurisy and bronchitis are prevalent in 
camp, and are generally due to exposure. 

The diseases of the sexual organs are a constant companion of 
the soldier, in peace and in war, in all latitudes and among all 
nations. They are the scourge of his life, and cause perhaps a 
great deal more unhappiness in the human family than all other 
classes of diseases put together. Gonorrhoea is almost never cured 
in the female, and the major part of operative work in gynecology 
is caused by gonococci infection, in many cases by men who believe 
themselves cured, and who cause unmerited suffering in their 
wives by bringing the hideous fruits of their licentiousness into the 
marriage relationship ; or in other cases by men who cause their 
innocent wives to suffer with unmerited disease by their treachery 
and falseness. Gonorrhoea, then, is a notoriously serious disease, 
and very liable to be followed by lasting results which at the 
present times may never be cured, and is the most frequent cause 
of blindness in children. Our methods of treatment of gonorrhoea 
in the male are not satisfactory, and no physician should treat 
these diseases who is not skilful in microscopy and bacteriology ; 
as oftentimes the microscope is most essential in giving information 
in regard to the length of time to continue treatment, and they 
should not pronounce their cases cured too early, to the lasting 
harm of their patients. From work that is being done in the labora- 
tories, it would seem that in time we might have a serum that 
would cure, especially the chronic cases. 

Syphilis is prevalent, easily acquired, and uncertain in its course, 



362 ADJUTANT GENEKAL'S KEPORT. [Jan. 

and it is impossible to assure the patient that the disease may not 
again manifest itself at some future period of his life, or that he 
may not inoculate his wife or children. 

Now, what is to be done to prevent the spread of these diseases ? 
In some countries, in certain localities subject to military rule, an 
inspection at regular intervals not only of public prostitutes but 
also of the soldiers themselves by well-qualified surgeons, and the 
diseased of both sexes sent to the hospitals until the infective 
period is past, has lessened the spread of venereal diseases more 
than all other methods combined. While this is true of military 
establishments, I do not think that anybody who has lived any 
length of time in large European cities where all prostitutes are 
inspected will agree that it has much influence to materially lessen 
the disease which goes hand in hand with prostitution, where unin- 
spected men are free to roam at will and communicate disease. I 
remember on one occasion when attending a lecture on syphilis at 
the charity hospital at Berlin, Professor Gerhart, in speaking of 
the treatment of syphilis, divided the military officers of that city 
into three classes, — those who had taken the smear cure, those 
who were now taking it and those who would take it. 

In conclusion, then I would say that in these days of sanitary 
enlightenment there is much for us to expect, to hope and to strive, 
to obtain a greater efficiency among our men than in the days of 
our predecessors. 



Outline of Prophylaxis and Hygiene required for Summer 
Encampment of Volunteer Militia. 

By Maj. John P. Lombard, Surgeon, Ninth Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. 

From recent experiences in war we have learned that the mor- 
tality from disease is much greater than wounds received in action ; 
consequently our attention is called to the fact that military sur- 
gery of the present and the future will be principally of a preventive 
type. 

Much depends upon the surgeons of the militia, especially during 
the summer encampment, by thoroughly carrying out a sanitary 
condition of the camp, and in such a way that the men will be 
impressed individually with the importance of observing the old 
maxim, viz., that " cleanliness is next to godliness." 

In the first place, the ground for camp should be one of an ele- 
vated nature, situated near a rapidly running stream or a lake of 
pure water, one fed by springs, if possible, or else having a free 
outlet and inlet. A swiftly flowing river with high banks would 
be preferable, in order to secure good natural drainage, and where 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 363 

the ground or subsoil water is very low, at least eight feet below 
the surface, which should slope away from the river, stream or lake 
to a level plateau of considerable extent, and covered with a thick 
sod of grass, cut short. Where the above conditions cannot be 
obtained " in toto," and a position has shallow ground or subsoil 
water, deep drainage should be made, and thoroughly intersect 
every portion of the ground, to secure perfect drainage. 

Next in importance to the proper site for camp is the water sup- 
ply. This, if the camp is situated on the bank of a rapidly run- 
ning river, uncontaminated by sewage or other impurities, can be 
taken from the river at a point a sufficient distance up the stream, 
and conducted by means of pipes through the camp ; but the water 
from a lake, unless it is noted for its purity, had better be avoided. 
Another method of securing a water supply of almost undoubted 
purity, and which would not be greatly more expensive, would be 
to drive several wells in close proximity to each other, and on the 
opposite side of camp from the kitchens and sinks, or outside the 
guard limits. From these wells, of sufficient number, can be ob- 
tained in most instances a perfectly pure water supply, which can 
be forced through the camp by means of conducting pipes and 
steam power. 

The health of any command or camp is largely influenced by the 
nature of its water supply. The medical officer should satisfy 
himself that the water is sufficiently pure for drinking purposes, 
and, if not perfectly pure, the water should always be boiled before 
being used. I believe the only safe way is to boil all drinking 
water, no matter how pure the supply, in order that the men may 
become better acquainted with the latest and most practical methods 
of boiling water in camp. By so doing, he will learn to understand 
the importance of pure water as conducive to health, as compared 
with the evils resulting from drinking impure water. 

The disposal of slops and garbage from the kitchens, so as 
to render them innoxious, is also a matter of great importance. 
Square or rectangular holes should be dug in the ground, four to 
six feet deep and four feet wide by six long, placed at a convenient 
distance in the rear of the kitchens. If the subsoil is porous it is 
best, as it allows the more fluid portions of the refuse and slops to 
soak into the ground ; the remaining more solid parts are to be 
frequently covered by light layers of dry earth, the earth having 
been left from the excavation by its side for the purpose. In this 
way each latrine or excavation will last for encampment week in a 
perfectly sanitary condition. Where the soil is not porous, or 
where there is a hard subsoil, it is advisable to dig a ditch leading 
off from the bottom of the latrine, to allow the fluid to drain away 



364 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

into the soil, which will prevent the filling up of the latrine so 
rapidly. Dry garbage of considerable quantity from the kitchens 
often collect ; these can be gathered and burned. 

Sinks should be dug in a similar manner to the latrines, only 
longer and deeper. If possible, a shed should be erected over 
each sink, to protect the men during inclement weather. Clean 
earth should be frequently thrown into the sinks, and the contents 
kept thoroughly covered. The only way that this can be properly 
done is to have each man cover his own discharge. In obedience 
to orders from Lieutenant Colonel Devine at the annual encamp- 
ment of the Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, 1900, at South 
Framingham, I procured one dozen small shovels, such as are used 
for throwing coal into the stove. They were properly divided 
between the officers' and men's sinks. The men were ordered 
each to cover his discharge. I noticed that the men willingly 
complied with the order and the sinks were kept in a much better 
condition than if covered but two or three times daily. In addi- 
tion, a solution of copperas, chloride of lime or other disinfectants 
can be frequently thrown in. By each man promptly performing 
his duty in this respect, the fly will be deprived of one of the sources 
of disease germs which it is credited with collecting on its feet and 
conveying to individuals and contaminating food supplies. 

The tents should be pitched upon the driest and best-drained 
portion of the camp ground. If the weather should be wet or the 
ground damp, every tent or line of tents should be thoroughly 
ditched about, to secure greater dryness of the space of ground 
covered by the tent. Each morning, immediately after guard 
mounting, every tent should be reefed up from the bottom, all 
around, and tied there, to allow a free circulation of air, and should 
be left up until 4 p.m., unless in case of inclement weather. The 
bedding should be so arranged as to be aired, and freed from 
dampness that may have been absorbed during the night. 

Company quarters should always be kept thoroughly policed. 
Scraps of paper and refuse of any kind should not be allowed in or 
about quarters ; although they may not be positively unsanitary in 
their presence, they look badly. 

The soldier himself, as a component part of the camp and one 
of the most important factors in the sanitation of the summer 
encampment, should be clean in mind and body. The day before 
the departure for camp, each soldier, and officer as well, should 
take a bath, thereby placing himself in the best possible condition. 
He will be better protected from the liabilities to attacks of intes- 
tinal diseases, and from the effects of overheat. While at camp 
men should be supplied with the proper facilities for bathing, and 
encouraged to bathe as often as possible. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 365 

If, united with cleanliness, due attention is given to the diet, 
many of the diseases of camp life may be almost wholly avoided. 
Surgeons should frequently inspect the cook houses, and see that 
all meats and perishable goods are properly cared for in refriger- 
ators, and everything kept in a clean and orderly manner. 

On the occurrence of a contagious disease in any command, the 
medical officer attending should at once report through proper 
channels to the medical director. The surgeon in charge should 
immediately submit instructions for the guidance of the company 
officers, to facilitate prompt detection of the cases, for first aid, 
for removal and disinfection in their respective quarters. 

A dry camp ground, a pure water supply, good and simple food 
properly cooked, thorough policing, personal cleanliness and tem- 
perance in eating and drinking, are the principal points of good 
sanitation of a military camp. 



The Proportion of Medical Attendants to the Fighting Force. 

By Lieut. Com. Harry M. Cutts, Surgeon Naval Brigade, M. V. M. 

. To a medico-military observer, though the observations were 
taken from a distance, to be sure, of the Spanish-American war, 
one of the lessons which that war taught him was our unprepared- 
ness for the care of the sick and wounded military. 

At the beginning of the war, with the medical department of 
both the regular services quite below even the frugal limit of the 
law, the army was suddenly expanded to ten times its normal 
strength, and the navy to about twice its usual numbers of men 
and craft. 

Rifles by the thousand were found, equipments, clothing and 
ammunition were turned out in bulk by concerns working night 
and day, everything stanch afloat was purchased, so that with ex- 
traordinary speed a great army and navy were assembled for duty* 
and to learn, at least in one of the services, that the proportion of 
trained medical attendants to the fighting force, if it had ever been 
determined definitely, had not been maintained, or was at best an 
inadequate ratio. 

It is with the intent that this lesson shall not be forgotten, and 
to learn much from those who know more, that I bring my subject 
before you. 

In making out the requirements for the medical branch, the au- 
thorities of both the regular services ask only for the right to put 
upon their rosters the number of medical attendants of all grades 
which the lawful strength of the forces at that time require. This 
number, I presume, is sufficient to meet the emergencies of war of 



366 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

such a force, but absolutely no provision is made ahead by the 
government to provide a trained medical staff when war's alarums 
compel a sudden increase of its armies and navies. 

In the earlier wars such oversight might have been expected ; in 
the war of the rebellion it might be forgiven ; in the war with 
Spain it ought scarcely to have been expected or forgiven ; but in 
future wars such dereliction should not be forgiven. 

How, now, may the lesson learned in the Spanish war be applied 
for the prevention of the same mistake in case of the sudden ex- 
pansion of our fighting forces? It seems to me, by definitely 
fixing the proportion of medical attendants of all grades to the 
fighting force which shall be allowed the fighting force, and mak- 
ing it somebody's business to see that this ratio is properly and 
speedily supplied and kept supplied when and where needed. 

" Get your men to the front," has been the watchword in war, 
and always will be ; but the problem of keeping them there in 
fighting trim must also be solved, and the sanitary corps has as 
much to do with the solution as has the commissary and ordnance 
corps. 

At the height of the war of secession it has been estimated (Hoff , 
Proceedings Association Military Surgeons, 1899) that a ratio to 
the combatant forces of about 6 per cent, of medical and other 
officers and enlisted men were engaged in the care of the sick and 
wounded at the front. Besides this percentage, about 1 per cent, 
more were at the various base and general hospitals, caring for ten 
times their own number of patients. 

The medical attendants, then, in the war of secession were about 
7 per cent, of the fighting force. 

Let us take some gleanings from our war with Spain. 

For instance, Lieutenant Colonel Devine, in an excellent paper 
upon the management of a field hospital, recommends 3 commis- 
sioned officers for the administration, 1 surgeon for each 30 patients 
and 3 nurses for every 8, patients. If we add to these an officer's 
orderly, cooks, and of various civilian employees and details, 2 
persons more for every 30, we get 13 persons exclusively engaged 
in the care of every 30 sick and wounded soldiers by this system. 

Lieutenant Colonel Griffith, in charge of another division hospital, 
complains that on u July 7 [1898] I reported 98 patients in hospi- 
tal, and only 7 surgeons, including the surgeon in charge and a 
medical officer who was acting as quartermaster. This number was 
of course utterly inadequate." This hospital finally developed to 
one of 712 beds, and, with the carte blanche which was subsequently 
given by the authorities, 3 matrons, 158 trained nurses and 43 
contract surgeons were added to the former staff of 7 surgeons. 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 367 

This total of 211 strictly professional people, plus the other per- 
sonnel, must have raised this division hospital staff up to 300 
persons. 

Let us analyze the figures of these two officers. It must be 
remembered that their patients were mostly typhoid and dysenteric, 
— the kind of cases which require more nursing than do wounded 
men, but the kind also which every camp may be looked to to 
produce. Owing to lack of base hospitals there was very little 
forwarding of patients. In neither case were the troops subjected 
to the casualties of battle. If we call an army division 12,000 men, 
we find that Lieutenant Colonel Griffith's 300 attaches is 2.5 per 
cent, of its fighting strength. Lieutenant Colonel Devine, with his 
ratio of 13 to 30 maintained, would have managed the same 712 
beds with a personnel of 312 of all grades, or 2.6 per cent, of the 
paper strength of a division. In the first case the per cent, of 
attendants to patients is 42 (about) and in the second 40 (about), 
as compared with the 6 per cent, of the civil war, or 10 per cent, 
in base and general hospitals. These estimates are for division 
hospitals alone, with two, possibly three, medical stations between 
them and the firing line, and the base and general hospital in 
their rear, to say nothing of the transport, depot and rendezvous 
detachments. 

On the other hand, the first expedition to the Philippines landed 
about 11,500 officers and men. As near as I can make out, there 
were 30 medical officers and a squad of 225 hastily assembled and 
untrained men to act as a hospital corps, — a total of 255, or 
a percentage of 2.2 of the fighting strength, — and this for all 
purposes. 

There landed with Shafter's army in Cuba 71 commissioned 
medical officers. I cannot find how many others there were in the 
sanitary corps, but I can very well remember that after the battles 
of El Caney and San Juan, when only some 2,000 wounded needed 
care, there were loud calls for more medical help of all kinds. 

Colonel Hoff (regular) gives us the sanitary organization of the 
3 army corps in May, 1898. He had a total of 1,018 exclusively 
engaged in caring for the sick and wounded of a fighting strength 
of above 25,000, or 4. and a fraction per cent. 

In the navy things are greatly different. There is no room on 
shipboard except for men who give wounds or work the machinery 
for the fighters. As a consequence, the firing line, so to speak, is 
very badly provided with medical attendants. On a first-class 
ship, with say 575 officers and men, there are billets for 3 medical 
officers, .1 pharmacist, 1 hospital steward and from 2 to 4 hospital 
apprentices, — a total of 9 at the best, or about 1.6 per cent, of 



368 ADJUTANT GENEEAL'S EEPOET. [Jan. 

the combatant strength, as compared with Colonel Hoff's 4 per 
cent, in the army. Upon the landing of a battalion, a surgeon, a 
pharmacist, a bayman and four stretcher bearers are detailed to go 
along. In each armed boat or on abandoning the ship a medicine 
chest is a part of the regular equipment, and in the latter case the 
sick and wounded and the medical corps are distributed among the 
boats. Many of the crew get first-aid instruction, and torniquets 
and first-aid packages are by regulation distributed about the ship ; 
but the injured stand but little show of much assistance during the 
fury of a naval battle. 

If the hospital contingent comes uninjured through a battle, they 
act also as transport corps, as the ship is the transport of its own 
wounded, crew men being detailed to help, if they can be spared. 
The ships give up their sick and wounded to the various naval 
hospitals, or, as will be the case in war on a foreign station, to 
hospital ships with the fleet. • 

On Jan. 1, 1901, there were 181 surgeons, 32 pharmacists and 
mates and an undiscoverable number of hospital stewards and 
hospital apprentices, not, however, above 200, or a total of 413 
persons in the medical branch of the navy. If we take 15,000 men 
as the mean strength of the navy and marine corps, we get 2.8 per 
cent, as the proportion of medical attendants to the active strength 
of this service. This, of course, is too low a percentage to take 
as a standard. I find, however, that on June 3, 1900, the United 
States army employed a total of 5,043 persons of all grades, from 
surgeon general to orderly (without civilian employees), in the 
various units of its medical branch. If we call the average strength 
of the army as 95,000 men, we get a proportion of 5.2 per cent, 
of trained medical attendants to the fighting force ; and, as the 
army has been serving under conditions very nearly those of war, 
this percentage is more nearly a standard. It will be better, 
though, with American generosity to add something to this, and 
call 6 per cent, as our necessary proportion ; and for an army of 
500,000 men it takes much previous care and system to quickly 
train 30,000 men in the modern ideas of field surgery. 



Surgery of Future Wars. 

By First Lieut. Arthur G. Scoboria, Assistant Surgeon, Troop F, Cavalry, M. V. M. 

In the consideration of this subject I shall be able to point to 
only a few of the more prominent features — military and other- 
wise — that of necessity must have direct bearing upon the " Sur- 
gery of Future Wars." The rapid advance in civic conditions of 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No 7. 369 

a surgical nature, together with the almost equally rapid advance 
in military proficiency as regards inventions and changes in arms, 
and the consequent rendering of certain weapons of offence and 
defence, such as side-arms, practically of little value in battle, as 
shown by the decrease of wounds rendered by these weapons, must 
have great bearing upon the nature of military surgery. 

Two great headings may be made that are changing, and will 
probably continue to change, the courses pursued by medical offi- 
cers, namely, the weapons used, with their resulting wounds, and 
antiseptics and their application. 

Punctured wounds, as those received from the sabre or bayonet, 
have rapidly disappeared from the annals of military surgery, and 
now hold only a minor place. These will be received probably 
in wars with semi-civilized or barbarous tribes, as in the East, but 
to no great extent among civilized peoples. 

Gunshot wounds must be considered as very important, in the 
future. According to Lieutenant Colonel Forwood, the small- 
calibre bullet must be adopted by all nations, — " practically inde- 
formable against animal structures and almost identical in ballistic 
qualities, — alike in form, weight, calibre and velocity, and alike 
for the rifle, the carbine and the machine gun." "The factors 
which enter into the causation of gunshot wounds from these mis- 
siles will then be so constant and uniform as to produce far more 
constant and uniform results than have been observed with the old, 
deforming lead bullet." The small-calibre bullet has greater ve- 
locity, greater penetrating force and greater stability. As to the 
results of the wounds of the old lead missile and the new and more 
stable bullet, there will be less doubt. Fewer doubtful cases will 
exist. In the old, the question was one of complications. A part 
of the lead or portions of the clothing were more liable to be left 
in the track, or some extraneous material. These conditions rarely 
occur with the small bullet, and, as its force of penetration is 
greater and its stability greater, its impact against bone rarely 
deforms it. These conditions are to be looked for, and, if the 
wound is not immediately fatal, greater hope exists both for the 
surgeon and for the patient. 

As a result of the physical conditions of the small-calibre bullet 
and its greater velocity and consequently flatter trajectory, its 
effective range is greater, consequently engagements will occur at 
greater distances. More of these bullets can be carried, and battles 
will probably be shorter and more decisive. " The long, clean-cut, 
non-contused tracks of the small-calibre bullet favor internal hem- 
orrhage, — one chief cause of the mortality in the field. But, on 
the other hand, for those who survive the immediate effects of these 



370 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

injuries, these wounds, with their small valve-like openings, that 
readily close, are also favorable to healing ; and thus the ratio of 
recoveries to the number wounded will likewise be increased, while 
the per cent, of secondary mortality and the number of permanently 
crippled will be reduced, both through the more favorable character 
of their injuries by the new projectile and the new antiseptic methods 
of surgery." 

Antiseptic Treatment. — The discoveries made in bacteriology in 
the last two decades have changed very materially all surgery. 
While military surgery is coming in for its share, we feel this 
principle will have as great bearing upon surgery in the field as any 
one thing possibly can have, accompanied, as it is, by great changes 
in surgical technique. Wounds, such as compound fractures, 
received in action, which were almost universally followed by am- 
putation and almost as universally by death in the civil war, were 
treated with better success in regard to both results in the late 
war, and, by the unceasing application of this line of treatment, 
must show better results in the future. Many lives and limbs will 
be saved in the time to come that in the past must certainly have 
been lost. Not alone do these principles apply to compound frac- 
tures, but wounds of other portions of the body also. Laparot- 
omies may be attempted under more favorable conditions, and 
with more hope of a successful issue. Wounds of the thorax, if 
they have not penetrated some vessel, as the great arteries or veins 
or thoracic duct, may call for a brighter prognosis, because of the 
lack of contusion by the small bullet, and its cleaner path with less 
liability to infection. 

Hospital corps are receiving better instruction from year to year, 
and great stress should be laid upon the training of the members 
of this arm of the service in the fundamental principles of anti- 
septic surgical methods, so the surgeon may have in time of great 
need reliable assistants. Certain members in every corps will 
grasp readily the condition, and will be of great service in the 
future if opportunity arises. In emergencies, sufficient medical 
officers are not always available for operations, and such instruc- 
tion furnishes the assistant that will be able to supplant — that is, 
take the place of — the trained nurse in civil life. 

Another point of great importance that arises is, How and when 
shall medical assistance be rendered? This is important in this 
paper, as, the sooner after a wound is inflicted we can apply our 
new methods, so much more important and valuable will the sur- 
gery of the future become. It is stated by high authority that 
" the first and most difficult task will be to remove, without delay, 
the enormous number of wounded out of the lire-line," — due to 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 371 

the long range of modern- arms and relatively smokeless powder, 
and the conditions before stated in regard to the projectiles. Also, 
that, " under the new conditions, plans for the removal of the 
wounded from the field should be practically given up, and efforts 
made to provide temporary hospital accommodations for them in 
such places as may be practicable near at hand." Lieutenant 
Colonel Forwood, reviewing the surgical history of the war of the 
rebellion, calls attention to the late arrival of medical assistance at 
Gettysburg. All trains, except ammunition and ambulance wagons, 
were parked several miles away on July 1, while on July 2, during 
battle, the trains, hospital wagons and medical supplies were parked 
about twenty-five miles from the field. Medical Director Letter- 
man, recalling his experiences in the army of the Potomac, says : 
" Without proper means the medical department can no more take 
care of the wounded than the army can fight without ammunition." 
As soon as the battle terminated, the trains and medical supplies 
were sent for, and were of great service when they arrived. " It 
is rarely possible to hurry up the heavy wagons, but the medical 
staff detailed for hospital duty should come on the field with the 
troops, and, as soon as the engagement becomes settled, or even 
earlier, they can usually select a site for the field hospital," where 
the wounded can be sent and receive treatment, thus obviating to 
a great extent the necessity of long journeys, trying exposures, 
and the tendency to suppuration that time and lack of assistance 
invite. "An advance or flying detachment of the field hospital, 
consisting of a medical wagon and one or two light ambulances, 
a transport wagon," with tents, instruments and operating tables, 
dressings, etc., to take up the work in anticipation of the arrival 
of the heavier wagons of the train, will be a consideration of the 
future. ' 

First-dressing packages may be of great service in the future. 
One authority says he would rather receive and care for wounds 
that have been exposed to the air, dust and unclean figures, than 
to have them exposed to the sweat-stained dressings of these 
packages. It is suggested that these packages be protected by 
oiled paper, or some moderately impervious substance. Esmarch 
recalls instances where these packages furnished the only dressing 
during battle. If water could be obtained, and a few tablets of 
bichloride of mercury, a solution might be made in which the 
dressings may be immersed, and a first dressing of considerable 
antiseptic value could be had. One or two tablets of this antiseptic 
might be enclosed in the dressing, and the whole sewed in some 
convenient portion of the clothing of each soldier before an engage- 
ment. 



372 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

The great and increasing attention paid to the conditions of 
health in camp and garrison, first, the physical examination of 
troops and the mental examination of officers, supplying as it does, 
better material for duty and better medical officers for the care of 
that material ; the work and time expended of a hygienic nature ; 
the vast amount of labor in the rationing of troops ; the care 
exercised in regard to the water supply for great bodies of men, 
especially as regards the prevention of that greatest scourge of 
all, typhoid fever, in the way of boiled water, etc., — all have a 
marked bearing upon military surgery of the future. 



Care and Health of Troops in Hot Weather. 

By First Lieut. John W. Cummin, Assistant Surgeon, Battery A, Light Artillery, M. V. M. 

In discussing the question of the care of troops in hot weather, 
I mean to confine myself to hot weather such as we experience in 
this climate, leaving out of consideration all questions relating to 
the tropics. 

Every summer encampment of volunteer militia is an entire 
change in the mode of life for at least nine-tenths of the men, in that 
it is a life of constant exposure to the weather ; it is a change in 
the food and water, and a change in the kind and amount of work. 
Moreover, in every such body of troops there are a certain number 
of men who are in poor condition from in-door over-work, on whom 
these changes tell so much the more. We can thus see that there 
rests with the individual medical officer the necessity of constant 
supervision, together with the necessity of carrying out many small 
details of hygiene, which seem trivial, but which are of vital im- 
portance to the health of the men. 

To discuss fully the whole question of the hygiene of volunteer 
troops would be to consider the whole of military hygiene ; but, 
taking for granted a good location of camp and good water and 
food, I will consider briefly some of the important points relating 
to the soldier himself in hot weather. 

First, as to his clothing. This should be made to fit loosely, so 
as to allow free movements of every part of the body ; otherwise, 
mechanical work will be increased, and in hot weather this means 
loss of water and increased body temperature. The trousers espe- 
cially should be made loose about the hips, and the higher up the 
abdomen they go, the better, as they thus serve as a support and 
keep the abdomen warm. Suspenders are, as a rule, preferable to 
a belt, as, if the trousers be made loose, the belt must be made so 
tight as to make a constricting band around the abdomen. The 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 373 

coat also should fit the figure loosely, and have a large shoulder 
and arm for unconstrained exertion, and a loose collar. To be 
sure, the loose-fitting clothes do not give a smart appearance to 
the men ; but in hot weather the question of health should over- 
ride all others. Woodhull says : " No man held in position by his 
clothes is either very vigorous or soldierly ; setting up, not tight 
clothing, makes the martial figure." The khaki uniform has much 
less heat-retaining and damp-resisting powers than the blue uni- 
form ; therefore, in this climate, where we may have sudden changes 
of temperature, every man should wear light underclothing, — not 
simply a shirt, but drawers also. Formerly, when the blue uniform 
was worn entirely, the men were accustomed to wear a shirt only, 
omitting the drawers, and the blue cloth protected them from 
changes in the weather fairly well ; but now that khaki has been 
adopted, a more careful protection of the whole body by means of 
light underclothing is necessary. 

There are certain rules of personal hygiene necessary at all 
times, but especially so in hot weather. First of all, bodily clean- 
liness. So far as possible, each man should have some sort of a 
daily bath, to remove the accumulated sweat and dust. The feet 
need especial attention, as sweating tends to macerate the skin, 
and make it more susceptible to excoriations and blisters. After 
a march, the feet should always be washed, or at least wiped with 
a dry towel, and dry socks put on. The genitals and between the 
thighs and under the arms should be kept clean and free from 
chafing by frequent washing, and powdering if necessary. 

The men should be made to understand the absolute importance 
of a daily evacuation of the bowels, as any such interference with 
digestion in hot weather may bring about a diarrhoea, while the 
giving of any purgative medicines is to be avoided, for the same 
reason. 

Food need only be considered in respect to improper cooking. 
It should always be inspected by the medical officer before it is 
served to the men. Undercooking, so as to make any food 
indigestible, or improper frying, is to be especially avoided. 
This matter is of great importance, as such food may be the start- 
ing point of some digestive disturbance. The men should be, so 
far as possible, made to understand that thorough mastication is 
necessary to proper digestion, and that by taking time in eating 
they may be avoiding diarrhoea. After any exhausting work they 
should have a short rest before eating, as otherwise they are likely 
to eat too much food, while at the same time improperly masticat- 
ing it. 

In hot weather abundance of water is an absolute necessity, as 



374 ADJUTANT GENERAL'S REPORT. [Jan. 

increased loss of perspiration must be made up for by increased 
drinking of water or other fluids, such as tea, coffee or cocoa. 
These latter drinks are of value, but care should be taken to have 
t^iem fairly weak, as, if too strong, they may retard digestion. 
Alcohol should never be issued except after some exceptionally 
exhausting work, or when the men have been exposed to some 
extreme changes of temperature. If given, it should always be in 
small quantities, and in hot water, as the heat is in itself markedly 
stimulating. In hot weather it is to be absolutely avoided, as it 
directly increases the danger from sunstroke. On the march in 
hot weather many soldiers are accustomed to drink as often as they 
can find water. This habit should be checked, as such men are 
always thirsty and uncomfortable, and stand hard work less well 
than those who drink less. The men should be taught to take 
a good drink before starting, and then, so far as possible, to 
abstain from further drinking until the end of the march is in sight. 
This plan, carried out a few times, will make them less uncomfort- 
able than before ; and, if the sensation of thirst still remains, a 
pebble or other hard substance carried in the mouth will lessen it 
by exciting a flow of saliva. Other questions relating to the care 
of troops on the march in hot weather were brought up in Major 
Jenkins' paper, read at the previous meeting, so I now pass them 
over. 

The exposure to changes of temperature and to wet and cold 
tells severely on the soldier, and especially so on the man who has 
come from an office desk to the open-air life of camp. If he can 
have plenty of dry clothing and comfortable lodgings, he can bear 
exposure without much risk ; but if he goes to bed in damp clothes, 
or is covered by damp blankets, he is almost sure to be on the sick 
list. Woodhull says : " Wet feet may be uncomfortable, but are 
rarely harmful to a man in good health who is taking active exer- 
cise. It is when he allows himself to rest and to be chilled that 
he takes cold." Hence it is during the prevalence of a rainstorm 
or an east wind that a careful supervision of the men is necessar}'. 
They should be taught to keep their blankets dry, to have a dry 
suit of clothes in which to sleep, and always to have a rubber blan- 
ket or other sufficient protection between them and the ground. A 
certain amount of exposure and subsequent illness is always to be 
expected ; but the sick list may be kept down by keeping a close 
watch over the men at such times. 

Exposure to the sun and to heat is another matter in which the 
men must be watched. The direct heat of the sun is especially felt 
by those unaccustomed to it, and it should be the rule that all men 



1902.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 7. 375 

wear hats when exposed in the middle of the day. If the weather be 
extremely hot, men should be warned to protect their arms and the 
back of their necks, as sunburn may annoy them considerably, even 
to the extent of causing loss of sleep. Actual sunstroke is seen 
especially in men unused to exposure, in wrongly dressed men and 
in alcoholics ; and, in doing any hard work in the sun, the men 
should be advised to have their collars loose, and to have leaves and 
wet paper in their hats. Heat-stroke, which is a form of exhaus- 
tion caused by heat associated with humidity, is seen in much the 
same classes of men as sunstroke. Hence, where men are known 
to be in poor condition, they should be carefully watched when 
exposed to any such conditions of temperature, and taken in charge 
at the very first signs of any such attack. 

Another condition, somewhat similar to heat-stroke in its effects, 
and seen in the same sort of weather, is what is known as " crowd- 
poisoning." It is a condition of exhaustion caused by breathing 
air deficient in oxygen and saturated with moisture, carbonic acid 
gas and the emanations of human bodies. Though most commonly 
seen in badly ventilated tents and barracks, it may occur in the 
open air, where troops are marching in close order, when the air is 
stagnant. In such a case the men are exposed to a combination 
of heat, dust and bad air, and become exhausted quickly, as the 
saturation of